Jun 23 17

Chronic Lyme Summit 2 Takeaways so far…

by Greg

Hey it’s Greg here…

Today is the fifth day of the Chronic Lyme Summit 2!

Over the past 5 days, several experts have shared new and innovative recommendations for diagnosing and treating Lyme disease, co-infections, parasites, etc.

Dr. Klinghardt talked about using ultrasound to enhance Lyme and co-infection testing.

Dr. Dahlgren shared about anti-parasite remedies like mimosa pudica and garlic.

Dr. Anderson talked about 40% of Lyme patients that are not improving have mast cell activation syndrome.

Here are more takeaways: Chronic Lyme Summit 2 Online – Free broadcast link

Awesome talks, more to come!

Greg

Not signed up to hear the free Chronic Lyme Summit?

>>> Sign me up to hear about the latest Lyme remedies
and treatments on the Chronic Lyme Summit 2 happening now <<<<

Jun 19 17

What are your biggest insights, takeaways from today’s Chronic Lyme Summit 2 speakers?

by Greg

Hey it’s Greg here…

Today is the first day of the Chronic Lyme Summit 2!

Today’s speakers are Dr. Wayne Anderson, Dr. James
Maskell, Scott Fosgren, Dr. Phillip Blair, and Dr. Jay Davidson.

Please feel free to share what was the most important thing
that you heard on the summit today. And check out what other
people are learning…

>>> Please click here to share your biggest insights
and takeaways from today’s speakers <<<

Peace,

Greg

Not signed up to hear the free Chronic Lyme Summit?

>>> Sign me up to hear about the latest Lyme remedies
and treatments on the Chronic Lyme Summit 2 happening now <<<<

Jun 19 17

Chronic Lyme Summit 2017 Interview with Greg Lee

by Greg

Welcome Chronic Lyme Summit 2 Listeners!

Here’s How to Get Your Free Copy of a powerpoint presentation which goes into greater detail about biofilm remedies, essential oils, herbs, and anti-Lyme remedies which was outlined in the Greg Lee Interview 
Click on the button below so we can send you the free download link to the detailed presentation which goes into greater depth on the interview topics. Please answer a few questions while we get your handout ready.

Thanks again for listening to the interview with Greg Lee on the “GoodbyeLyme™ Top Treatments and Remedies for Chronic Lyme Symptoms.”
________________________________________________

When you click the button above you’ll be taken to a page where you can enter your contact information for where you want your presentation delivered.

You’ll then receive a confirmation email.

In short:

1. We will never send you spam
2. We will not sell or give away your e-mail address
3. We will work diligently to defend your privacy
I want you to know that your email is safe with me

I will never share your email with anyone, for any reason.

You will also receive a free subscription to our GoodbyeLyme Newsletter.
You will receive articles, resources, and hear about events to help you to heal from Lyme disease and chronic co-infections. We do not share your information with anyone for any reason.

The newsletter comes out a few times a month, and I also send out reminders of offers, workshops, and programs.

Best regards,

Greg Lee

DISCLAIMER:

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-practitioner relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

May 28 17

#8 Challenge to Healing Lyme Disease: Secondary Infections

by Greg

One issue came up over and over again as I looked through
the over thousand responses to my question,
“What are the biggest challenges to healing Lyme disease?”
The #8 challenge from their responses is secondary infections
like C. Diff, Candida, drug resistant Staph / MARCONs. Many
of these people reported an increase in these infections after
receiving antibiotic treatment.
I’ll be sharing TREATMENTS and REMEDIES for overcoming
this and many other challenges to healing Lyme on my Chronic
Lyme Summit 2 interview.
The Summit will be broadcast online next month for Free from

June 19th – June 26th.

Peace and healing,

Greg
May 17 17

Sign up to hear the Chronic Lyme Summit 2 on June 19-26 for Free!

by Greg

A few weeks ago, over a thousand people shared their biggest
challenges to healing Lyme disease to help me prepare for my

interview on the Chronic Lyme Summit 2!

It has taken me a few weeks to analyze the survey results since

many went into great detail… (awesome!)

Anyway…

I promised to share the Top Five Challenges that were submitted

and the TREATMENTS and REMEDIES for these specific

challenges on my Chronic Lyme Summit 2 interview.

The Summit will be broadcast online next month for FREE from

June 19th – June 26th.

So If you’d like to get notified of the schedule for when you
can hear the 35 Lyme disease speakers, sign up here:

Apr 30 17

How These Five Essential Oils Cool the Burning Pains of Bartonella and Lyme Disease

by Greg

For people with Bartonella and Lyme disease that struggle with burning pains in their hands and feet
by Greg Lee

Do you know what music teachers say about learning to play an instrument? “Practice, practice, practice.” My daughter is learning to play the clarinet. She is doing well follow along with the notes on the music sheet. Sometimes she enjoys making hilarious squeaks and some really loud honking sounds just for fun.

How is a squeaky, loud clarinet similar to the burning pains of a Bartonella / Lyme infection?

Similar to squeaky clarinet sounds, people with Bartonella and Lyme can have “loud” burning pains in their extremities
Patients diagnosed with Bartonella and Lyme disease often report a wide variety of painful symptoms including: joint pain[1], muscle pain[2], lymph node pain, abdominal discomfort[3], and uncomfortable symptoms of polyneuropathy/nerve damage: weakness, tingling, prickling, awkward gait, and numbness[4]. One of the most urgent and often debilitating symptoms that people report is burning pain in the hands, feet and extremities[5]. Burning symptoms are often worse in the morning and may improve over time or with movement. One theory is that nerve damage is an underlying cause of these burning symptoms[6]. Looking at other illnesses with similar burning pain sensations may provide new insights into relieving these hot, painful symptoms.

In addition to Bartonella, people with a condition called erythromelalgia report similar symptoms of burning pain in their hands and feet
“Erythromelalgia is a rare condition that primarily affects the feet and, less commonly, the hands (extremities). It is characterized by intense, burning pain of affected extremities, severe redness (erythema), and increased skin temperature that may be episodic or almost continuous in nature.[7]” People with erythromelalgia reported their pain attacks being triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by cooling methods[8]. A large proportion of these pain attacks often do not involve a specific trigger. An important discovery connects a specific genetic mutation with enhanced pain sensitivity in people with erythromelalgia.

The intensity of burning symptoms in erythromelalgia patients is correlated with a mutation in a gene called SCN9A
The SCN9A gene affects the functioning of sodium channel called NaV1.7[9]. This channel is a pathway for transmission of pain signals. Genetic mutations affecting NaV1.7 may blunt the ability to sense pain[10] or dramatically increase pain sensitivity[11]. Researchers are looking at tarantulas for a possible remedy for relieving the the burning pain sensations.

Green velvet tarantula venom contains a peptide that may help to reduce burning pains by affecting the NaV1.7 channel[12]
In mouse experiments, this peptide was effective a reducing the pain sensations by blocking the NaV1.7 channel. Finding and testing at tarantula-based NaV1.7 medication will likely take years to develop.

What else may help with reducing burning hand and feet pain in people with Lyme disease and Bartonella?

A compound found in essential oils also blocks the pain signals in the NaV1.7 channel
There is a compound called methyl eugenol that was effective in inhibiting nerve signals in NaV1.7 channels in a lab experiment[13]. In animal studies, this compound has demonstrated anesthetic and the ability to block pain signals[14]. This compound is approved by the FDA for use as a flavoring agent that can be directly and safely added to food[15]. Caution: rodent studies on methyl eugenol have produce cancer tumors in their livers[16]. Processing these oils into a microparticle called a liposome may increase their ability to penetrate into nerve cells to enhance pain relief[17]. All of these essential oils are classified as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration).

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #1: Sweet Basil
In lab studies, methyl eugenol content in basil essential oil varied from 1.5% – 78% depending upon the country of origin[18]. Turkish sweet basil had the highest content of methyl eugenol. This essential oil is classified by the FDA as GRAS[19]. In animal studies, this essential oil demonstrated analgesic effects on chronic non-inflammatory pain such as fibromyalgia[20] and the ability to block pain signals[21]. This herb has been used traditionally to treat nerve pain, convulsions and a variety of neurodegenerative disorders[22]. In addition to basil, bay laurel essential oil has pain relieving properties.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #2: Bay Laurel
This essential oil has been found to contain up to 9% methyl eugenol[23]. In animal studies, this oil has demonstrated pain relieving effects[24]. In other studies, bay laurel essential oil inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and it’s biofilms[25] and Candida species and it’s biofilms[26]. Bay Laurel essential oil has FDA GRAS status[27]. In addition to bay laurel, rose essential oil also has pain relieving properties.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #3: Rose
Rose essential oil may contain up to 3.5% methyl eugenol[28]. In human studies, rose essential oil provided pain relief in patients with dysmenorrhea[29] and renal colic[30]. In a lab study, rose oil demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and, Staphylococcus aureus[31]. Rose essential oil has FDA GRAS status[32]. Clary sage essential oil also contains methyl eugenol.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #4: Clary Sage
Clary sage essential oil may contain up to 2% methyl eugenol. This oil was effective at reduce labor pains in a human study[33]. A combination of clary sage with other essential oils helped to reduce menstrual cramps[34]. In lab studies, clary sage essential oil was effective against Staphylococcus clinical strains resistant to antibiotics[35] and in combination with juniper essential oil demonstrated anti-yeast properties[36]. Clary sage is classified as FDA GRAS[37]. Lemon balm essential oil also contains methyl eugenol.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #5: Lemon Balm
Lemon balm essential oil may contain up to 1% methyl eugenol[38]. In animal studies, this essential oil was effective at reducing neuropathy pain[39] and inflammation[40]. Lemon balm oil is also effective against Candida albicans[41], herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2[42], cutaneous leishmaniosis[43], Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes[44] in lab studies. Lemon balm essential oil is classified at FDA GRAS[45]. Multiple essential oils may help with reducing how patients feel burning pain by disrupting signals transmitted along the NaV1.7 pathway.

These five essential oils may help to reduce burning pain caused by Bartonella and Lyme disease
People with Lyme disease and Bartonella and Lyme disease that report burning pains in their hands, feet, and extremities may be helped by research into a similar painful illness called erythromelalgia. Just like getting a child to play their instrument at a harmonious level, these essential oils contain a compound called methyl eugenol that may help to reduce the intensity of burning pains by blocking the pain signals along the NaV1.7 pathway. Some of these remedies may also help with reducing inflammation and other types of pain. Processing these essential oils into microparticle liposome remedies may enhance their ability to penetrate inside of nerve cells and improve pain relief. Since formulating essential oils into liposomal remedies requires special knowledge and equipment, work with a Lyme / liposomal literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a customized, safe, and effective treatment plan for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday May 1st at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Bartonella and Lyme disease burning pain, co-infections, and inflammation symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to reduce burning pains from Bartonella and Lyme disease? Tell us about it.


[1] Arvikar, Sheila L., and Allen C. Steere. “Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Arthritis.” Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 29, no. 2 (June 2015): 269–80. doi:10.1016/j.idc.2015.02.004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4443866/

[2] Garakani, Amir, and Andrew G. Mitton. “New-Onset Panic, Depression with Suicidal Thoughts, and Somatic Symptoms in a Patient with a History of Lyme Disease.” Case Reports in Psychiatry 2015 (2015): 457947. doi:10.1155/2015/457947.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25922779

[3] Mazur-Melewska, Katarzyna, Anna Mania, Paweł Kemnitz, Magdalena Figlerowicz, and Wojciech Służewski. “Cat-Scratch Disease: A Wide Spectrum of Clinical Pictures.” Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postȩpy Dermatologii I Alergologii 32, no. 3 (June 2015): 216–20. doi:10.5114/pdia.2014.44014.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495109/

[4] “Polyneuropathy.” Wikipedia, April 10, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Polyneuropathy&oldid=774727139.

[5] Horowitz, Richard. Why Can’t I Get Better? Solving the Mystery of Lyme and Chronic Disease. Macmillan, 2013.  P. 75.

[6] “Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases Research Center.” Accessed April 29, 2017. http://asp.cumc.columbia.edu/lymedisease/askthedr/for_pt/displayanswer1-lyme.asp?Departments=LymeDisease&Controlnumber=4824.

[7] “Erythromelalgia – NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders).” NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders). Accessed April 29, 2017. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/erythromelalgia/.

[8] McDonnell, Aoibhinn, Betsy Schulman, Zahid Ali, Sulayman D. Dib-Hajj, Fiona Brock, Sonia Cobain, Tina Mainka, Jan Vollert, Sanela Tarabar, and Stephen G. Waxman. “Inherited Erythromelalgia due to Mutations in SCN9A: Natural History, Clinical Phenotype and Somatosensory Profile.” Brain: A Journal of Neurology 139, no. Pt 4 (April 2016): 1052–65. doi:10.1093/brain/aww007.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920677

[9] Kim, David Ta, Elsa Rossignol, Kinda Najem, and Luis H. Ospina. “Bilateral Congenital Corneal Anesthesia in a Patient with SCN9A Mutation, Confirmed Primary Erythromelalgia, and Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder.” Journal of AAPOS: The Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus 19, no. 5 (October 2015): 478–79. doi:10.1016/j.jaapos.2015.05.015.

[10] Remacle, Albert G., Sonu Kumar, Khatereh Motamedchaboki, Piotr Cieplak, Swathi Hullugundi, Jennifer Dolkas, Veronica I. Shubayev, and Alex Y. Strongin. “Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) Proteolysis of the Extracellular Loop of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Potential Alterations in Pain Signaling.” The Journal of Biological Chemistry 290, no. 38 (September 18, 2015): 22939–44. doi:10.1074/jbc.C115.671107.

[11] Levinson, Simon R., Songjiang Luo, and Michael A. Henry. “THE ROLE OF SODIUM CHANNELS IN CHRONIC PAIN.” Muscle & Nerve 46, no. 2 (August 2012): 155–65. doi:10.1002/mus.23314.

[12] Flinspach, M., Q. Xu, A. D. Piekarz, R. Fellows, R. Hagan, A. Gibbs, Y. Liu, et al. “Insensitivity to Pain Induced by a Potent Selective Closed-State Nav1.7 Inhibitor.” Scientific Reports 7 (January 3, 2017): 39662. doi:10.1038/srep39662.

[13] Wang, Ze-Jun, Boris Tabakoff, Simon R Levinson, and Thomas Heinbockel. “Inhibition of Nav1.7 Channels by Methyl Eugenol as a Mechanism Underlying Its Antinociceptive and Anesthetic Actions.” Acta Pharmacologica Sinica 36, no. 7 (July 2015): 791–99. doi:10.1038/aps.2015.26.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26051112

[14] Dallmeier, K., and E. A. Carlini. “Anesthetic, Hypothermic, Myorelaxant and Anticonvulsant Effects of Synthetic Eugenol Derivatives and Natural Analogues.” Pharmacology 22, no. 2 (1981): 113–27.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7208593

[15] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 29, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?FR=172.515.

[16] Humans, IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risk to. METHYLEUGENOL. International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2013. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK373178/.

[17] Tadicherla, Sujatha, and Brian Berman. “Percutaneous Dermal Drug Delivery for Local Pain Control.” Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2, no. 1 (March 2006): 99–113.

[18] Pandey, Abhay Kumar, Pooja Singh, and Nijendra Nath Tripathi. “Chemistry and Bioactivities of Essential Oils of Some Ocimum Species: An Overview.” Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine 4, no. 9 (September 2014): 682–94. doi:10.12980/APJTB.4.2014C77.

[19] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[20] Nascimento, Simone S., Adriano A. S. Araújo, Renan G. Brito, Mairim R. Serafini, Paula P. Menezes, Josimari M. DeSantana, Waldecy Lucca, et al. “Cyclodextrin-Complexed Ocimum Basilicum Leaves Essential Oil Increases Fos Protein Expression in the Central Nervous System and Produce an Antihyperalgesic Effect in Animal Models for Fibromyalgia.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences 16, no. 1 (December 29, 2014): 547–63. doi:10.3390/ijms16010547.

[21] Venâncio, Antônio Medeiros, Alexandre Sherlley Onofre, Amintas Figueiredo Lira, Péricles Barreto Alves, Arie Fitzgerald Blank, Angelo Roberto Antoniolli, Murilo Marchioro, Charles dos Santos Estevam, and Brancilene Santos de Araujo. “Chemical Composition, Acute Toxicity, and Antinociceptive Activity of the Essential Oil of a Plant Breeding Cultivar of Basil (Ocimum Basilicum L.).” Planta Medica 77, no. 8 (May 2011): 825–29. doi:10.1055/s-0030-1250607.

[22] Singh, Varinder, Aditi Kahol, Inder Pal Singh, Isha Saraf, and Richa Shri. “Evaluation of Anti-Amnesic Effect of Extracts of Selected Ocimum Species Using in-Vitro and in-Vivo Models.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 193 (December 4, 2016): 490–99. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2016.10.026.

[23] “Essential Oils | Oxford Biosciences.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://oxfordbiosciences.com/essential-oils/.

[24] Sayyah, M., G. Saroukhani, A. Peirovi, and M. Kamalinejad. “Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Leaf Essential Oil of Laurus Nobilis Linn.” Phytotherapy Research: PTR 17, no. 7 (August 2003): 733–36. doi:10.1002/ptr.1197.

[25] Merghni, A., H. Marzouki, H. Hentati, M. Aouni, and M. Mastouri. “Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Laurus Nobilis L. Essential Oil against Staphylococcus Aureus Strains Associated with Oral Infections.” Pathologie-Biologie, December 4, 2015. doi:10.1016/j.patbio.2015.10.003.

[26] Peixoto, Larissa Rangel, Pedro Luiz Rosalen, Gabriela Lacet Silva Ferreira, Irlan Almeida Freires, Fabíola Galbiatti de Carvalho, Lúcio Roberto Castellano, and Ricardo Dias de Castro. “Antifungal Activity, Mode of Action and Anti-Biofilm Effects of Laurus Nobilis Linnaeus Essential Oil against Candida Spp.” Archives of Oral Biology 73 (January 2017): 179–85. doi:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2016.10.013.

[27] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[28] “Essential Oils | Oxford Biosciences.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://oxfordbiosciences.com/essential-oils/.

[29] Uysal, Murat, Hatice Yılmaz Doğru, Emrah Sapmaz, Ufuk Tas, Bülent Çakmak, Asker Zeki Ozsoy, Fatih Sahin, Safiye Ayan, and Mehmet Esen. “Investigating the Effect of Rose Essential Oil in Patients with Primary Dysmenorrhea.” Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice 24 (August 2016): 45–49. doi:10.1016/j.ctcp.2016.05.002.

[30] Ayan, Murat, Ufuk Tas, Erkan Sogut, Mustafa Suren, Levent Gurbuzler, and Feridun Koyuncu. “Investigating the Effect of Aromatherapy in Patients with Renal Colic.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) 19, no. 4 (April 2013): 329–33. doi:10.1089/acm.2011.0941.

[31] Ulusoy, Seyhan, Gülgün Boşgelmez-Tinaz, and Hale Seçilmiş-Canbay. “Tocopherol, Carotene, Phenolic Contents and Antibacterial Properties of Rose Essential Oil, Hydrosol and Absolute.” Current Microbiology 59, no. 5 (November 2009): 554–58. doi:10.1007/s00284-009-9475-y.

[32] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[33] Burns, E., C. Blamey, S. J. Ersser, A. J. Lloyd, and L. Barnetson. “The Use of Aromatherapy in Intrapartum Midwifery Practice an Observational Study.” Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery 6, no. 1 (February 2000): 33–34. doi:10.1054/ctnm.1999.0901.

[34] Ou, Ming-Chiu, Tsung-Fu Hsu, Andrew C. Lai, Yu-Ting Lin, and Chia-Ching Lin. “Pain Relief Assessment by Aromatic Essential Oil Massage on Outpatients with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.” The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research 38, no. 5 (May 2012): 817–22. doi:10.1111/j.1447-0756.2011.01802.x.

[35] Sienkiewicz, Monika, Anna Głowacka, Katarzyna Poznańska-Kurowska, Andrzej Kaszuba, Anna Urbaniak, and Edward Kowalczyk. “The Effect of Clary Sage Oil on Staphylococci Responsible for Wound Infections.” Postepy Dermatologii I Alergologii 32, no. 1 (February 2015): 21–26. doi:10.5114/pdia.2014.40957.

[36] Sienkiewicz, Monika, Anna Głowacka, Katarzyna Poznańska-Kurowska, Andrzej Kaszuba, Anna Urbaniak, and Edward Kowalczyk. “The Effect of Clary Sage Oil on Staphylococci Responsible for Wound Infections.” Postepy Dermatologii I Alergologii 32, no. 1 (February 2015): 21–26. doi:10.5114/pdia.2014.40957.

[37] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[38] “Essential Oils | Oxford Biosciences.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://oxfordbiosciences.com/essential-oils/.

[39] Hasanein, Parisa, and Hassan Riahi. “Antinociceptive and Antihyperglycemic Effects of Melissa Officinalis Essential Oil in an Experimental Model of Diabetes.” Medical Principles and Practice: International Journal of the Kuwait University, Health Science Centre 24, no. 1 (2015): 47–52. doi:10.1159/000368755.

[40] Bounihi, Amina, Ghizlane Hajjaj, Rachad Alnamer, Yahia Cherrah, and Amina Zellou. “In Vivo Potential Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Melissa Officinalis L. Essential Oil.” Advances in Pharmacological Sciences 2013 (2013). doi:10.1155/2013/101759.

[41] Hăncianu, Monica, Ana Clara Aprotosoaie, Elvira Gille, Antonia Poiată, Cristina Tuchiluş, A. Spac, and Ursula Stănescu. “Chemical Composition and in Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Melissa Officinalis L. from Romania.” Revista Medico-Chirurgicala a Societatii De Medici Si Naturalisti Din Iasi 112, no. 3 (September 2008): 843–47.

[42] Schnitzler, P., A. Schuhmacher, A. Astani, and Jürgen Reichling. “Melissa Officinalis Oil Affects Infectivity of Enveloped Herpesviruses.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 15, no. 9 (September 2008): 734–40. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2008.04.018.

[43] Andrade, Milene Aparecida, Clênia Dos Santos Azevedo, Flávia Nader Motta, Maria Lucília Dos Santos, Camila Lasse Silva, Jaime Martins de Santana, and Izabela M. D. Bastos. “Essential Oils: In Vitro Activity against Leishmania Amazonensis, Cytotoxicity and Chemical Composition.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 16, no. 1 (November 8, 2016): 444. doi:10.1186/s12906-016-1401-9.

[44] Abdellatif, Fahima, Hadjira Boudjella, Abdelghani Zitouni, and Aicha Hassani. “Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil from Leaves of Algerian Melissa Officinalis L.” EXCLI Journal 13 (July 17, 2014): 772–81.

[45] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

DISCLAIMER:-

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-practitioner relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

Apr 2 17

Can These Five Remedies Take the Daily Pain Out of Lyme Disease and Co-Infections?

by Greg

For people with Lyme disease and co-infections that have severe pain due to elevated levels of Substance P in the nervous system

by Greg Lee

When I was a boy, my friends and I would bike to the local novelty store. I would buy the baseball cards and gum. One of my friends would always buy the pranks: plastic bugs, fake vomit, and the garlic flavored candy. One day, he tricked me with a chewing gum pack that had a hidden wire spring. As I took the stick of gum, it snapped on my finger. Yow!

How is chronic pain due to elevated Substance P in people with Lyme and co-infections just like getting your finger caught in a chewing gum prank?

Similar to getting your finger snapped in a chewing gum prank, people with pain syndromes have elevated levels of Substance P
Substance P is a neuropeptide which acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator[1]. It can be found throughout the body. This peptide can activate mast cells to release inflammatory compounds. It is highly correlated with levels of pain in people diagnosed with Fibromyalgia[2], chronic migraines[3], osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis[4], Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)[5], Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS)[6], chronic neck pain[7], inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)[8], chronic degenerative disc disease[9], and carpal tunnel syndrome[10]. Substance P has also been indicated in patients with depression, anxiety[11], brain parasites[12], neuroinflammation[13], inflammation, hepatitis, hepatotoxicity, cholestasis, pruritus, myocarditis, bronchiolitis, abortus, bacteria and viral infections[14]. Unfortunately, Substance P may aggravate neurological problems in people with Lyme disease.

Substance P may aggravate neurological problems in people with Lyme disease
In one animal study, Substance P contributed increases in blood-brain barrier permeability, neurological damage, increased CNS infection, and elevated numbers of microglia/macrophages in mice with a Lyme disease central nervous system (CNS) infection[15]. In another lab study, Substance P aggravated the release of inflammatory compounds COX-2 and PGE(2) in mouse brain cells[16]. Another study suggests that Substance P contributes to CNS inflammation in neurological Lyme disease patients[17]. Substance P is often elevated in electrical frequency scans of Lyme patients that report chronic pain. Medications can help with reducing some Substance P symptoms.

A new type of medication called Neurokinin 1 (NK1) antagonists can help with Substance P symptoms
NK1 antagonists have helped relieve depression, anxiety, and vomiting in patients with elevated levels of Substance P[18]. By modulating serotonin and norepinephrine, they help relieve emotional symptoms. Unfortunately, most studies indicate that NK1 antagonists are not effective at relieving pain caused by elevated levels of Substance P[19]. Many patients use opioid pain relief medications which can have side effects including: constipation, nausea, and addiction.

What else can help relieve chronic pain caused by elevated levels of Substance P in people with Lyme disease?

Here are five remedies for reducing pain caused by elevated Substance P
In human, animal, and lab studies, there are five natural remedies which have pain relieving and anti-inflammatory effects in Substance P pain experiments. By processing remedies into microparticles called liposomes, has enabled remedies to be delivered more effectively into the brain[20] to counteract Substance P’s effects of increased neurological inflammation. Liposomal analgesic medications are more effective at relieving pain than their non-liposomal equivalent[21]. Liposomal remedies have also been effective at reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines in a mouse study[22]. Fortunately, liposomal encapsulation and delivery of essential oils and herbs may enhance their penetration and effectiveness against Substance P pain and neurological inflammation in Lyme patients.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #1: Peppermint Essential Oil
Peppermint essential oil was effective at inhibiting Substance P smooth muscle contraction in one animal study[23]. In a human study, peppermint oil combined with ethanol was effective at relieving headache pain[24]. Do not apply peppermint oil undiluted to the feet of children under 12 years old, avoid large doses, it may cause heartburn, perianal burning, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting when taken internally. Peppermint essential oil use is contraindicated in children under 30 months old, and people should avoid the intake of peppermint oil with gallbladder disease, severe liver damage, gallstones, chronic heartburn[25], and cases of cardiac fibrillation and in patients with a G6PD (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) deficiency[26]. Nutmeg essential oil may also help to reduce Substance P pain.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #2: Nutmeg Essential Oil
Nutmeg essential oil was effective at reducing chronic inflammatory pain through inhibition of COX-2 expression and substance P release in one rat study[27]. Maximum daily internal dose for nutmeg oil is 73 mg and 4% topically. In large doses may produce psychotropic effects[28]. Tea tree is another essential oil that may also help to relieve Substance P pain.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #3: Tea Tree Essential Oil
In a human skin and rat skin study, tea tree oil and it’s active compounds reduced Substance P induced microvascular changes, histamine, and inflammatory response[29]. In other studies, tea tree oil assists in wound healing and reduces inflammatory compounds[30]. This oil has a low risk of dermal irritation. Maximum safe dermal use is 15%. Caution: high doses, approximately a teaspoon to a half a teacup, of tea tree oil have resulted in ataxia, drowsiness, diarrhea, unconsciousness, and allergic reactions[31]. Angelica sinensis is an herb that may also help to treat pain from elevated Substance P.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #4: Angelica Sinensis Herb
In one mouse study, Angelica sinensis reduced levels of Substance P, the number of mast cells, inflammatory cytokines: Interleukin-4 (IL-4), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), as well as the expressions of nuclear factor kappa-beta (NF-κB)[32]. This herb has been used for hundreds of years in Chinese medicine for relieving pain, lubricating the intestines, and treating female irregular menstruation and amenorrhea. It has also been used extensively for treating anemia and other blood disorders by tonifying, replenishing, and invigorating blood. A literature review of this herb illustrates the wide range of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory activity, antifibrotic action, antispasmodic activity, antioxidant activities, and neuroprotective action, as well as cardio- and cerebrovascular effects[33].

Angelica is also used to treat coldness, numbness, painful joints, soreness and weakness of the low back and knees. Topically, it is used with other herbs to treat sores and abscesses, reduce swelling, expel pus, relieve pain, and heal slow-healing sores. It unblocks the bowels and is used to treat constipation and dry stools. It has also been used to treat arrhythmia, stroke, migraine, nephritis, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, liver disease, bed wetting, uterine prolapse, insomnia, blocked blood vessels in the hands and feet, herpes zoster, alopecia, psoriasis, dermatological disorders, deafness, anal fissure, chronic hypertropic rhinitis, and chronic pharyngitis[34].

Herb – drug interaction: It is suggested that concurrent use of Angelica with wafarin may potentiate the effects of wafarin, anti-platelet, and anticoagulant drugs. This herb reduces scopolamine and cycloheximide induced amnesia in rats. Angelica also treats acetaminophen-induced liver damage[35]. Another herb called Dragon’s blood may also help to relieve pain from elevated Substance P.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #5: Dragon’s Blood Herb
This herb has been used for thousands of years for treating various pains for due to its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. In one study on rat neurons, this herb demonstrated anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects by blocking the synthesis and release of substance P through inhibition of COX-2 protein induction and intracellular calcium ion concentration[36]. In another animal study, Dragon’s Blood active compounds had a synergistic effect on relieving pain in spinal nerve cells[37]. A combination of herb and essential remedies may help with reducing chronic pain caused by elevated levels of Substance P in people with Lyme disease.

These five remedies may help to reduce chronic pain caused by too much Substance P
People with neurological Lyme disease that also have chronic pain may have elevated levels of Substance P. Similar to not getting your finger snapped in a chewing gum prank, a combination of herbal and essential oil remedies may help to reduce the levels of Substance P, inflammatory cytokines, and chronic pain. These remedies may also help with protecting the brain and nervous system against the damaging and inflammatory effects of Substance P. Processing these herbs and essential oils into microparticle remedies, called liposomes, may enhance their ability to penetrate the blood brain barrier, lower levels of Substance P in the central nervous system, and relieve chronic brain and body pain. Since liposomal remedies requires special knowledge and equipment, work with a Lyme / liposomal literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a customized, safe, and effective treatment plan for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday April 3rd at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Lyme disease chronic pain, co-infections, and inflammation symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to reduce Lyme disease and co-infection chronic pain from elevated levels of Substance P? Tell us about it.


1 “Substance P.” Wikipedia, February 28, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php
2 Lyon, Pamela, Milton Cohen, and John Quintner. “An Evolutionary Stress-Response Hypothesis for Chronic Widespread Pain (Fibromyalgia Syndrome).” Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.) 12, no. 8 (August 2011): 1167–78. doi:10.1111/j.1526-4637.2011.01168.x. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21692974
3 Jang, M.-U., J.-W. Park, H.-S. Kho, S.-C. Chung, and J.-W. Chung. “Plasma and Saliva Levels of Nerve Growth Factor and Neuropeptides in Chronic Migraine Patients.” Oral Diseases 17, no. 2 (March 2011): 187–93. doi:10.1111/j.1601-0825.2010.01717.x.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20659258
4 Lisowska, Barbara, Aleksander Lisowski, and Katarzyna Siewruk. “Substance P and Chronic Pain in Patients with Chronic Inflammation of Connective Tissue.” PloS One 10, no. 10 (2015): e0139206. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0139206.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4622041/
5 Wei, Tzuping, Tian-Zhi Guo, Wen-Wu Li, Saiyun Hou, Wade S. Kingery, and John David Clark. “Keratinocyte Expression of Inflammatory Mediators Plays a Crucial Role in Substance P-Induced Acute and Chronic Pain.” Journal of Neuroinflammation 9 (July 23,
2012): 181. doi:10.1186/1742-2094-9-181.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3458986/
6 Ma, Yong, Zu-Long Wang, Zi-Xue Sun, Bo Men, and Bao-Qing Shen. “[Common TCM syndrome pattern of chronic pelvic pain syndrome relates to plasma substance p and beta endorphin].” Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue = National Journal of Andrology 20, no. 4 (April 2014): 363–66. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24873166
7 Karlsson, L., B. Gerdle, B. Ghafouri, E. Bäckryd, P. Olausson, N. Ghafouri, and B. Larsson. “Intramuscular Pain Modulatory Substances before and after Exercise in Women with Chronic Neck Pain.” European Journal of Pain (London, England) 19, no. 8 (September 2015): 1075–85. doi:10.1002/ejp.630.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430591
8 Jarcho, Johanna M., Natasha A. Feier, Alberto Bert, Jennifer A. Labus, Maunoo Lee, Jean Stains, Bahar Ebrat, et al. “Diminished Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Patients with Two Forms of Chronic Visceral Pain.” Pain 154, no. 7 (July 2013): 987–96.
doi:10.1016/j.pain.2013.02.026. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23582152
9 Schroeder, Malte, Lennart Viezens, Christian Schaefer, Barbara Friedrichs, Petra Algenstaedt, Wolfgang Rüther, Lothar Wiesner, and Nils Hansen-Algenstaedt. “Chemokine Profile of Disc Degeneration with Acute or Chronic Pain.” Journal of Neurosurgery. Spine 18, no. 5 (May 2013): 496–503. doi:10.3171/2013.1.SPINE12483.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23473344
10 Öztürk, Niyazi, Nuray Erin, and Serdar Tüzüner. “Changes in Tissue Substance P Levels in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.” Neurosurgery 67, no. 6 (December 2010): 1655-1660; discussion 1660-1661. doi:10.1227/NEU.0b013e3181fa7032.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21107196
11 Schwarz, Markus J., and Manfred Ackenheil. “The Role of Substance P in Depression: Therapeutic Implications.” Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience 4, no. 1 (March 2002): 21–29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181667/
12 Robinson, Prema, Armandina Garza, Joel Weinstock, Jose A. Serpa, Jerry Clay Goodman, Kristian T. Eckols, Bahrom Firozgary, and David J. Tweardy. “Substance P Causes Seizures in Neurocysticercosis.” PLoS Pathogens 8, no. 2 (February 2012):
e1002489. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002489.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22346746
13 Johnson, M. Brittany, Ada D. Young, and Ian Marriott. “The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders.” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 10 (2016): 296. doi:10.3389/fncel.2016.00296.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28101005
14 Muñoz, Miguel, and Rafael Coveñas. “Involvement of Substance P and the NK-1 Receptor in Human Pathology.” Amino Acids 46, no. 7 (July 2014): 1727–50. doi:10.1007/s00726-014-1736-9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24705689
15 Johnson, M. Brittany, Ada D. Young, and Ian Marriott. “The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders.” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 10 (2016): 296. doi:10.3389/fncel.2016.00296.
http://journal.frontiersin.org/…/fncel.2016.00296/full
16 Rasley, Amy, Ian Marriott, Craig R. Halberstadt, Kenneth L. Bost, and Juan Anguita. “Substance P Augments Borrelia Burgdorferi-Induced Prostaglandin E2 Production by Murine Microglia.” Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950) 172, no. 9 (May 1,
2004): 5707–13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15100316
17 Martinez, Alejandra N., Geeta Ramesh, Mary B. Jacobs, and Mario T. Philipp. “Antagonist of the Neurokinin-1 Receptor Curbs Neuroinflammation in Ex Vivo and in Vitro Models of Lyme Neuroborreliosis.” Journal of Neuroinflammation 12 (December 30,
2015): 243. doi:10.1186/s12974-015-0453-y.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26714480
18 Schwarz, Markus J., and Manfred Ackenheil. “The Role of Substance P in Depression: Therapeutic Implications.” Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience 4, no. 1 (March 2002): 21–29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181667/
19 Diemunsch, P., G. P. Joshi, and J.-F. Brichant. “Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists in the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.” BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia 103, no. 1 (July 1, 2009): 7–13. doi:10.1093/bja/aep125.
https://academic.oup.com/bja/article/103/1/7/459585/Neurokinin-1-receptor-antagonistsin-the
20 De Luca, Maria Antonietta, Francesco Lai, Francesco Corrias, Pierluigi Caboni, Zisis Bimpisidis, Elias Maccioni, Anna Maria Fadda, and Gaetano Di Chiara. “Lactoferrin- and Antitransferrin-Modified Liposomes for Brain Targeting of the NK3 Receptor Agonist
Senktide: Preparation and in Vivo Evaluation.” International Journal of Pharmaceutics 479, no. 1 (February 1, 2015): 129–37. doi:10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.12.057.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25560308
21 Franz-Montan, Michelle, André L. R. Silva, Karina Cogo, Cristiane de C. Bergamaschi, Maria C. Volpato, José Ranali, Eneida de Paula, and Francisco C. Groppo. “Liposome-Encapsulated Ropivacaine for Topical Anesthesia of Human Oral Mucosa.” Anesthesia and Analgesia 104, no. 6 (June 2007): 1528–1531, table of contents. doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000262040.19721.26.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17513653
22 Thamphiwatana, Soracha, Weiwei Gao, Marygorret Obonyo, and Liangfang Zhang. “In Vivo Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection with Liposomal Linolenic Acid Reduces Colonization and Ameliorates Inflammation.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111, no. 49 (December 9, 2014):
17600–605. doi:10.1073/pnas.1418230111.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25422427
23 Hills, J. M., and P. I. Aaronson. “The Mechanism of Action of Peppermint Oil on Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle. An Analysis Using Patch Clamp Electrophysiology and Isolated Tissue Pharmacology in Rabbit and Guinea Pig.” Gastroenterology 101, no. 1 (July 1991): 55–65. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1646142
24 Göbel, H., G. Schmidt, M. Dworschak, H. Stolze, and D. Heuss. “Essential Plant Oils and Headache Mechanisms.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 2, no. 2 (October 1995): 93–102. doi:10.1016/S0944-7113(11)80053-X.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/…/pii/S094471131180053X
25 “Peppermint Safety Info | National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy.” Accessed April 1, 2017. http://naha.org/naha-blog/peppermint-safety-info/.
26 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013. https://www.amazon.com/Essential-Oil-Safety…/dp/0443062412
27 Zhang, Wei Kevin, Shan-Shan Tao, Ting-Ting Li, Yu-Sang Li, Xiao-Jun Li, He-Bin Tang, Ren-Huai Cong, Fang-Li Ma, and Chu-Jun Wan. “Nutmeg Oil Alleviates Chronic Inflammatory Pain through Inhibition of COX-2 Expression and Substance P Release in Vivo.” Food & Nutrition Research 60 (April 26, 2016). doi:10.3402/fnr.v60.30849.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4848392/
28 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013.
29 Khalil, Zeinab, Annette L. Pearce, Narmatha Satkunanathan, Emma Storer, John J. Finlay-Jones, and Prue H. Hart. “Regulation of Wheal and Flare by Tea Tree Oil: Complementary Human and Rodent Studies.” The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 123, no. 4 (October 2004): 683–90. doi:10.1111/j.0022-202X.2004.23407.x.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15373773
30 Khalil, Zeinab, Annette L. Pearce, Narmatha Satkunanathan, Emma Storer, John J. Finlay-Jones, and Prue H. Hart. “Regulation of Wheal and Flare by Tea Tree Oil: Complementary Human and Rodent Studies.” The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 123, no. 4 (October 2004): 683–90. doi:10.1111/j.0022-202X.2004.23407.x.
http://www.jidonline.org/…/S0022-202X(15)30988-X/abstract
31 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013.
32 Lee, Jaehong, You Yeon Choi, Mi Hye Kim, Jae Min Han, Ji Eun Lee, Eun Hye Kim, Jongki Hong, Jinju Kim, and Woong Mo Yang. “Topical Application of Angelica Sinensis Improves Pruritus and Skin Inflammation in Mice with Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms.” Journal of Medicinal Food 19, no. 1 (January 2016): 98–105. doi:10.1089/jmf.2015.3489.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26305727
33 Wei, Wen-Long, Rui Zeng, Cai-Mei Gu, Yan Qu, and Lin-Fang Huang. “Angelica Sinensis in China-A Review of Botanical Profile, Ethnopharmacology, Phytochemistry and Chemical Analysis.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 190 (August 22, 2016): 116–41. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2016.05.023. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27211015
34 Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and
Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., pp. 918 – 924.
35 Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and
Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., pp. 918 – 924.
36 Li, Yu-Sang, Jun-Xian Wang, Mei-Mei Jia, Min Liu, Xiao-Jun Li, and He-Bin Tang. “Dragon’s Blood Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Responses by Blocking the Synthesis and Release of Substance P in Rats.” Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 118, no. 1 (2012): 43–54.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22198006
37 Guo, Min, Su Chen, and Xiangming Liu. “Material Basis for Inhibition of Dragon’s Blood on Evoked Discharges of Wide Dynamic Range Neurons in Spinal Dorsal Horn of Rats.” Science in China. Series C, Life Sciences 51, no. 11 (November 2008): 1025–38. doi:10.1007/s11427-008-0133-6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18989646


DISCLAIMER:-

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-practitioner relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

Mar 4 17

Five Treatments for Stopping Runaway Mast Cell Inflammation Caused by Lyme, Parasites, and Mold

by Greg


For people with severe allergies and swollen tissues who have been diagnosed with Lyme, mold, or parasitic infections
by Greg Lee

Have you ever washed a car with a giggly little girl? One warm day, my daughter and I got out the big sponges and soaped up the car. She did the lower half and I did the upper. Her giggly side came out when she got to rinse off the car. Small girl + hose + giggles = spray daddy! She chased me around the car laughing and spraying me from top to bottom. I’m sure I got rinsed more than the car

How is being drenched by a little kid with a hose similar to excess mast cell inflammation caused by an underlying Lyme disease, parasitic, or mold infection?

Similar to being totally soaked by a giggly little girl and a garden hose, many infections can trigger a flood of excess mast cell inflammation
Multiple infections can trigger mast cells to release a large amount of inflammatory compounds. In animal studies, Lyme disease1, parasitic helminths, nematodes, protozoa including Malaria, mold including Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae, bacterial infections including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, group A streptococcal (GAS) skin infection, and E. coli peritoneal and urinary infections, Haemophilus influenzae otitis media; and polymicrobial intra-abdominal sepsis can trigger mast cells to quickly release inflammatory compounds2. In human and animal studies, viral infections including Dengue3, H1N54, Herpes5, and respiratory syncytial virus6 are also capable of triggering the release of mast cell inflammation. Mast cells are an initial line of defense against invading pathogens.

Mast cells inflammation is a normal immune system response to invading pathogens
Mast cells are white blood cells that have the ability to trigger the release of infection fighting inflammatory compounds upon invading germs. These cells are are found in most tissues of the body. Immature mast cells circulate through the blood and implant in tissues with a vascular blood supply. They are particularly concentrated in the tissues exposed to the outside environment: skin, airways and intestines, which are perfect for detecting an incoming invader. These cells are also effective at keeping many infections in check.

Mast cells may also help to suppress certain infections
In mouse experiments, mast cells mediate the expulsion of parasite worms: Trichinella spiralis and Strongyloides. Moreover, mast cell–deficient mice develop larger number of parasites and larger lesions in a Leishmania major infection7. Mast cells decrease the uptake and growth of pulmonary tularemia in macrophages in another mouse study8. Unfortunately in chronic infection patients, mast cells can be hyper-activated which results in the over-production of inflammatory compounds.

Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is defined as the excess over production of mast cell inflammation
Mast cell activation syndrome has been known to produce a wide range of chronic symptoms in patients with mold exposure9, Lyme disease10, recurrent infections and low antibody levels, specifically in immunoglobulin (Ig) types IgG, IgM and IgA. Symptoms often include new infections, chronic lung disease, and inflammation and infection of the gastrointestinal tract11, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS)12. Different systems in the body may present with these MCAS symptoms13 including:

  • Dermatological: flushing, easy bruising, either a reddish or a pale complexion, itchiness
  • Cardiovascular: lightheadedness, dizziness, presyncope, syncope
  • Gastrointestinal: diarrhea, cramping, intestinal discomfort, nausea, vomiting, small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
  • Swallowing, throat tightness
  • Psychological & Neurological: brain fog, short term memory dysfunction, difficulty with recalling words, headaches, migraines
  • Respiratory: congestion, coughing, wheezing
  • Vision/Eyes: ocular discomfort, conjunctivitis
  • Constitutional: general fatigue and malaise, food, drug, and chemical intolerances especially fragrances, sense of being cold all the time
  • Musculoskeletal: osteoporosis and osteopenia including young patients
  • Rapid weight gain, obesity, diabetes
  • Anaphylaxis especially if too many inflammatory compounds are dumped suddenly into a patient’s system, difficulty breathing, itchy hives, flushing or pale skin, feeling of warmth, weak and rapid pulse, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness and fainting

Symptoms can be caused by or worsened by triggers, which vary widely and are patient-specific. Common triggers include: alcohol, and high-histamine content foods, temperature extremes, airborne smells including perfumes or smoke, exercise or exertion, emotional stress, hormonal changes – particularly during adolescence, pregnancy and women’s menstrual cycles. These symptoms are thought to be caused be genetic issues and are therefore incurable. Since mast cells are widespread throughout the body, symptoms can also occur in virtually all organs and tissues. Moreover, symptoms can flare up from time to time, waxing and waning over years to decades14. Specific inflammatory markers have been found in MCAS patients.

Specific inflammatory compounds have been identified in mast cell activation patients
Many different inflammatory compounds can be produced and released by mast cells. These compounds have been identified as markers in patients with MCAS: Beta-Tryptase15, histamine, heparin, proteases and cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), arachidonic acid metabolites PGD2 and LTC416, and a number of other cytokines/growth factors and chemokines including Interleukin-5 (IL-5), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Interleukin-16 (IL-16), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), nerve growth factor (NGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as several C-C chemokines17. Medications can help with managing MCAS symptoms.

Medications can help with reducing inflammatory compounds from mast cell activation
There have not been any therapeutic trials of medications for MCAS. Medications that have been effective have been used in animal studies, individuals, or small group human case studies. Due to the wide variance in patient symptoms, triggers, genetic and epigenetic factors, highly individualized treatment is necessary18. Anti-allergy drugs reduced mast cell inflammation in mice19, antihistamine drugs, immunosuppresive medications, kinase inhibitors, chemotherapy drugs, and in rare cases stem cell therapy have had varying success in reducing symptoms in MCAS patients20.

What else can help you to reduce runaway inflammation caused by mast cell activation?

Here are five treatments for reducing excess mast cell inflammation
Inhibiting mast cell inflammation production may help to stop chronic MCAS. Formulating remedies into microparticles called liposomes has been effective at mediating mast cell activation21. Liposomal remedies have also been effective at reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α22 in a mouse study. Liposomal remedies also have been shown to penetrate deeper into host cells23 and into pathogens24 than their non-liposomal counterparts. Fortunately, liposomal encapsulation and delivery of essential oils, herbs, and supplements may increase their penetration and effectiveness against mast cell activation syndrome inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #1: Essential Oils
Lavender oil inhibits mast cell inflammation in mice and rats and TNF-α production25. A 2:1 combination of essential oils of Lavender and Thyme reduced mast cell degranulation and inflammation when applied for twenty-one days in a mouse study26. German chamomile oil was highly effective at inhibiting mast cell degranulation in a lab study27 and a rat study28. Geranium essential oil inhibited cultured mast cell degranulation in another rat study29. Not only essential oils, but also herbs have been effective at inhibiting mast cell inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #2: Herbs
Compounds in salvia miltiorrhiza root, Chinese name Dan Shen, blunt mast cell degranulation in a lab study30. Sanguisorbia root, Chinese name: Di Yu, inhibited mast cell degranulation, Interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and TNF-α production in a lab study31. Houttuynia, Chinese name: Yu Xing Cao, blocked the mast cell inflammatory production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) in a lab experiment32. Magnolia flower, Chinese name: Xin Yi Hua, has been effective in inhibiting mast cell histamine release33. Agaricus mushroom, Chinese name: Ji Song Rong, inhibits the mast cell anaphylactic shock reaction in a rat study34. Supplements can also help with mast cell inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #3: Natural supplements
Curcumin, the main compound in turmeric, inhibits the release of inflammation from mast cells35. Alpha lipoic acid decreased mast cell histamine release and the anaphylactic shock reaction in a lab study36. Quercetin has also been effective in blocking the release of mast cell histamine and inflammatory cytokines Il-8, TNF, and NF-kB37. Theanine inhibited the mast cell production of histamines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion by suppressing NF-κB activation in a lab study38. In addition to supplements, electro-acupuncture has shown to be effective at reducing mast cell inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #4: Electro-acupuncture
In one rat study, electro-acupuncture on acupoint Stomach-25 inhibited the activation of Substance-P and VIP in mast cells39. Frequency Specific Microcurrent can also help with reducing histamine and inflammatory compounds.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #5: Frequency Specific Microcurrent
Frequency Specific Microcurrent uses very low level electrical currents to reduce histamines, inflammatory compounds, and bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections and toxins40. These currents are combined with a second set of frequencies to target inflamed or toxic areas. As a result, allergic symptoms and inflamed areas can be dramatically reduced. A combination of remedies and treatments can help with reducing mast cell activation symptoms.

These five treatments may help to reduce excess histamines and inflammation from mast cell activation syndrome
People with Lyme disease, mold or parasites that have allergic sensitivity due to excess histamines, way too much inflammation, and symptoms that are not improving with Lyme medications may have a condition called mast cell activation syndrome. Just like redirecting a girl to rinse the car instead of soaking her dad, remedies and treatments may help to reduce the overproduction of histamine, inflammatory cytokines and persistent symptoms of mast cell activation. Processing herbs, essential oils, and supplements into microparticle remedies, called liposomes, may help them to be more effective at reducing mast cell inflammation symptoms. Since liposomal remedies requires special knowledge and equipment, work with a Lyme / liposomal literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a customized, safe, and effective treatment plan for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday March 6th at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Lyme disease, co-infection, and mast cell inflammation symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to reduce allergic reactions and inflammation due to Lyme induced mast cell activation? Tell us about it.


1 Talkington, Jeffrey, and Steven P. Nickell. “Borrelia Burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release.” Infection and Immunity 67, no. 3 (March 1999): 1107–15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC96436/
2 Urb, Mirjam, and Donald C. Sheppard. “The Role of Mast Cells in the Defence against Pathogens.” PLOS Pathogens 8, no. 4 (April 26, 2012): e1002619. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002619.
http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article? id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1002619
3 Chu, Ya-Ting, Shu-Wen Wan, Robert Anderson, and Yee-Shin Lin. “Mast Cell-Macrophage Dynamics in Modulation of Dengue Virus Infection in Skin.” Immunology 146, no. 1 (September 2015): 163–72. doi:10.1111/imm.12492. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26059780
4 Hu, Yanxin, Yi Jin, Deping Han, Guozhong Zhang, Shanping Cao, Jingjing Xie, Jia Xue, et al. “Mast Cell-Induced Lung Injury in Mice Infected with H5N1 Influenza Virus.” Journal of Virology 86, no. 6 (March 2012): 3347–56. doi:10.1128/JVI.06053-11.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22238293
5 Larocca, R. D. “Eosinophilic Conjunctivitis, Herpes Virus and Mast Cell Tumor of the Third Eyelid in a Cat.” Veterinary Ophthalmology 3, no. 4 (2000): 221–25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11397307
6 Shirato, Kazuya, and Fumihiro Taguchi. “Mast Cell Degranulation Is Induced by A549 Airway Epithelial Cell Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus.” Virology 386, no. 1 (March 30, 2009): 88–93. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2009.01.011.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19195674
7 Urb, Mirjam, and Donald C. Sheppard. “The Role of Mast Cells in the Defence against Pathogens.” PLOS Pathogens 8, no. 4 (April 26, 2012): e1002619. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002619.
http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article…
8 Ketavarapu, Jyothi M., Annette R. Rodriguez, Jieh-Juen Yu, Yu Cong, Ashlesh K. Murthy, Thomas G. Forsthuber, M. Neal Guentzel, Karl E. Klose, Michael T. Berton, and Bernard P. Arulanandam. “Mast Cells Inhibit Intramacrophage Francisella Tularensis
Replication via Contact and Secreted Products Including IL-4.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105, no. 27 (July 8, 2008): 9313–18. doi:10.1073/pnas.0707636105.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18591675
9 Theoharides, Theoharis C., Julia M. Stewart, Erifili Hatziagelaki, and Gerasimos Kolaitis. “Brain ‘fog,’ Inflammation and Obesity: Key Aspects of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Improved by Luteolin.” Frontiers in Neuroscience 9 (July 3, 2015). doi:10.3389/fnins.2015.00225. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4490655/
10 Talkington, Jeffrey, and Steven P. Nickell. “Borrelia Burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release.” Infection and Immunity 67, no. 3 (March 1999): 1107–15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC96436/
11 “Common Variable Immunodeficiency.” Wikipedia, September 25, 2016. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php title=Common_variable_immunodeficiency&oldid=741130072. https://en.wikipedia.org/…/Common_variable…
12 “Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.” Wikipedia, November 25, 2016.
https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php? title=Mast_cell_activation_syndrome&oldid=751436907.
13 “Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.” Wikipedia, November 25, 2016.
https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php…. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mast_cell_activation_syndrome
14 Molderings, Gerhard J, Stefan Brettner, Jürgen Homann, and Lawrence B Afrin. “Mast Cell Activation Disease: A Concise Practical Guide for Diagnostic Workup and Therapeutic Options.” Journal of Hematology & Oncology 4 (March 22, 2011): 10. doi:10.1186/1756-8722-4-10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3069946/
15 Payne, V., and P. C. A. Kam. “Mast Cell Tryptase: A Review of Its Physiology and Clinical Significance.” Anaesthesia 59, no. 7 (July 2004): 695–703. doi:10.1111/j.1365- 2044.2004.03757.x. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15200544
16 Akin, Cem, Peter Valent, and Dean D. Metcalfe. “Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: Proposed Diagnostic Criteria.” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 126, no. 6 (December 2010): 1099–104.e4. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2010.08.035.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3753019/
17 Metcalfe, Dean D. “Mast Cells and Mastocytosis.” Blood 112, no. 4 (August 15, 2008): 946–56. doi:10.1182/blood-2007-11-078097.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2515131/
18 Molderings, Gerhard J., Britta Haenisch, Stefan Brettner, Jürgen Homann, Markus Menzen, Franz Ludwig Dumoulin, Jens Panse, Joseph Butterfield, and Lawrence B. Afrin. “Pharmacological Treatment Options for Mast Cell Activation Disease.” Naunyn-
Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology 389 (2016): 671–94. doi:10.1007/s00210-016-1247-1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903110/
19 Wang, Jing, and Guo-Ping Shi. “Mast Cell Stabilization: Novel Medication for Obesity and Diabetes.” Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews 27, no. 8 (November 2011): 919–24. doi:10.1002/dmrr.1272.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3318912/
20 Molderings, Gerhard J., Britta Haenisch, Stefan Brettner, Jürgen Homann, Markus Menzen, Franz Ludwig Dumoulin, Jens Panse, Joseph Butterfield, and Lawrence B. Afrin. “Pharmacological Treatment Options for Mast Cell Activation Disease.” Naunyn-
Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology 389 (2016): 671–94. doi:10.1007/s00210-016-1247-1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903110/
21 Inoh, Yoshikazu, Satoshi Tadokoro, Hiroki Tanabe, Makoto Inoue, Naohide Hirashima, Mamoru Nakanishi, and Tadahide Furuno. “Inhibitory Effects of a Cationic Liposome on Allergic Reaction Mediated by Mast Cell Activation.” Biochemical
Pharmacology, 2013. http://agris.fao.org/agrissearch/
search.do?recordID=US201500023163. http://agris.fao.org/agrissearch/search.do…
22 Thamphiwatana, Soracha, Weiwei Gao, Marygorret Obonyo, and Liangfang Zhang. “In Vivo Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection with Liposomal Linolenic Acid Reduces Colonization and Ameliorates Inflammation.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111, no. 49 (December 9, 2014):
17600–605. doi:10.1073/pnas.1418230111.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25422427
23 Deno, Sho, Naohiro Takemoto, and Hiroo Iwata. “Introduction of Antioxidant-Loaded Liposomes into Endothelial Cell Surfaces through DNA Hybridization.” Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 22, no. 1 (January 1, 2014): 350–57. doi:10.1016/j.bmc.2013.11.023. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345482
24 Mugabe, Clement, Majed Halwani, Ali O. Azghani, Robert M. Lafrenie, and Abdelwahab Omri. “Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.” Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 50, no. 6 (June 1, 2006): 2016–22. doi:10.1128/AAC.01547-
05. http://aac.asm.org/content/50/6/2016.full
25 Kim, H. M., and S. H. Cho. “Lavender Oil Inhibits Immediate-Type Allergic Reaction in Mice and Rats.” The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 51, no. 2 (February 1999): 221–26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10217323
26 Seo, Young Mi, and Seok Hee Jeong. “[Effects of Blending Oil of Lavender and Thyme on Oxidative Stress, Immunity, and Skin Condition in Atopic Dermatitis Induced Mice].” Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing 45, no. 3 (June 2015): 367–77. doi:10.4040/jkan.2015.45.3.367.
https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php…
27 Mitoshi, Mai, Isoko Kuriyama, Hiroto Nakayama, Hironari Miyazato, Keiichiro Sugimoto, Yuko Kobayashi, Tomoko Jippo, Kazuki Kanazawa, Hiromi Yoshida, and Yoshiyuki Mizushina. “Effects of Essential Oils from Herbal Plants and Citrus Fruits on DNA Polymerase Inhibitory, Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory, Antiallergic, and Antioxidant Activities.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 60, no. 45 (November 14, 2012): 11343–50. doi:10.1021/jf303377f. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23088772
28 Miller, T., U. Wittstock, U. Lindequist, and E. Teuscher. “Effects of Some Components of the Essential Oil of Chamomile, Chamomilla Recutita, on Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells.” Planta Medica 62, no. 1 (February 1996): 60–61. doi:10.1055/s-2006-
957799. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8720389
29 Kobayashi, Yuko, Harumi Sato, Mika Yorita, Hiroto Nakayama, Hironari Miyazato, Keiichiro Sugimoto, and Tomoko Jippo. “Inhibitory Effects of Geranium Essential Oil and Its Major Component, Citronellol, on Degranulation and Cytokine Production by Mast
Cells.” Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry 80, no. 6 (June 2016): 1172–78. doi:10.1080/09168451.2016.1148573. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26927807
30 Han, Jing-Yan, Jing-Yu Fan, Yoshinori Horie, Soichiro Miura, De-Hua Cui, Hiromasa Ishii, Toshifumi Hibi, Hiroshi Tsuneki, and Ikuko Kimura. “Ameliorating Effects of Compounds Derived from Salvia Miltiorrhiza Root Extract on Microcirculatory Disturbance and Target Organ Injury by Ischemia and Reperfusion.” Pharmacology &
Therapeutics 117, no. 2 (February 2008): 280–95.
doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.09.008. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18048101
31 Yang, Ju-Hye, Jae-Myung Yoo, Won-Kyung Cho, and Jin Yeul Ma. “Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Sanguisorbae Radix Water Extract on the Suppression of Mast Cell Degranulation and STAT-1/Jak-2 Activation in BMMCs and HaCaT Keratinocytes.” BMC
Complementary and Alternative Medicine 16 (September 6, 2016): 347. doi:10.1186/s12906-016-1317-4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27599590
32 Lee, Hee Joe, Hye-Sook Seo, Gyung-Jun Kim, Chan Yong Jeon, Jong Hyeong Park, Bo-Hyoung Jang, Sun-Ju Park, Yong-Cheol Shin, and Seong-Gyu Ko. “Houttuynia Cordata Thunb Inhibits the Production of pro-Inflammatory Cytokines through Inhibition
of the NFκB Signaling Pathway in HMC-1 Human Mast Cells.” Molecular Medicine Reports 8, no. 3 (September 2013): 731–36. doi:10.3892/mmr.2013.1585.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23846481
33 Shen, Y., E. C. K. Pang, C. C. L. Xue, Z. Z. Zhao, J. G. Lin, and C. G. Li. “Inhibitions of Mast Cell-Derived Histamine Release by Different Flos Magnoliae Species in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 15, no. 10 (October 2008): 808–14. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2008.04.012. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18585022
34 Choi, Yun Ho, Guang Hai Yan, Ok Hee Chai, Yung Hyun Choi, Xin Zhang, Jung Min Lim, Ji-Hyun Kim, et al. “Inhibitory Effects of Agaricus Blazei on Mast Cell-Mediated Anaphylaxis-like Reactions.” Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 29, no. 7 (July 2006):
1366–71.
35 Kurup, Viswanath P., and Christy S. Barrios. “Immunomodulatory Effects of Curcumin in Allergy.” Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 52, no. 9 (September 2008): 1031–39. doi:10.1002/mnfr.200700293. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398870
36 Choi, Yun Ho, Ok Hee Chai, Eui-Hyeog Han, Su-Young Choi, Hyoung Tae Kim, and Chang Ho Song. “Lipoic Acid Suppresses Compound 48/80-Induced Anaphylaxis-like Reaction.” Anatomy & Cell Biology 43, no. 4 (December 2010): 317–24. doi:10.5115/acb.2010.43.4.317.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3026184/
37 Weng, Zuyi, Bodi Zhang, Shahrzad Asadi, Nikolaos Sismanopoulos, Alan Butcher, Xueyan Fu, Alexandra Katsarou-Katsari, Christina Antoniou, and Theoharis C. Theoharides. “Quercetin Is More Effective than Cromolyn in Blocking Human Mast Cell Cytokine Release and Inhibits Contact Dermatitis and Photosensitivity in Humans.” PLOS ONE 7, no. 3 (March 28, 2012): e33805. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033805.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22470478
38 Kim, N. H., H. J. Jeong, and H. M. Kim. “Theanine Is a Candidate Amino Acid for Pharmacological Stabilization of Mast Cells.” Amino Acids 42, no. 5 (May 2012): 1609– 18. doi:10.1007/s00726-011-0847-9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21344174
39 Wu, Huan-Gan, Bin Jiang, En-Hua Zhou, Zheng Shi, Da-Ren Shi, Yun-Hua Cui, Suo-Tang Kou, and Hui-Rong Liu. “Regulatory Mechanism of Electroacupuncture in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Preventing MC Activation and Decreasing SP VIP Secretion.”
Digestive Diseases and Sciences 53, no. 6 (June 2008): 1644–51. doi:10.1007/s10620-007-0062-4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17999187
40 DC, Carolyn McMakin MA. Frequency Specific Microcurrent in Pain Management, 1e. 1 Pap/Dvdr edition. Edinburgh ; New York: Churchill Livingstone, 2011.

DISCLAIMER:-

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-practitioner relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

Jan 15 17

2017 Lyme Healer Association Renewal

by Greg

Here is where to renew your membership in Lyme Healer Association (LHA).

Benefits of the LHA:

  • Monthly training webinars
  • Latest research on Lyme disease and other infections
  • Cutting edge articles on effective remedies and treatments
  • Online interactions with other Lyme literate practitioners
  • Learn what treatments and remedies are helping Lyme patients NOW in other clinics
  • Get answers to your questions around helping  your most challenging patients
  • Closed Facebook Group to share problems and get feedback

You will have access to previous trainings on:

  • Neurological Lyme disease
  • Bartonella
  • Babesia
  • Ehrlichia
  • Parasites
  • Viral infections
  • Fungal infections
  • Essential oils
  • and more…

Click below to renew your subscription for only $300 for a entire year.





Renew now while you have this page open.
We love having you in the association!

This offer expires Friday January 20th at 11:59 PM EST.
After that the cost of the Lyme Healer Association will go up to $47 per month.Greg 🙂

Jan 3 17

Two Frogs Has Moved to a New Office as of January 1st!

by Greg

moving_van

Two Frogs has moved into a larger office!

We are open at our new location inside the:

Frederick Innovative Technology Center (FITCI) at
4539 Metropolitan Court
Frederick, MD 21704

fitci_front

 

There are multiple visitor spaces (highlighted in yellow) across from the front entrance of the FITCI.
If all the visitor spaces are taken, you can park in any open parking space.

 

fitci_above

Here is what the lobby looks like:

fitci_lobby

Have a seat in the waiting area.

Tell the receptionist you are here to see Greg Lee.
Restrooms are right behind the reception desk.
Water is available upon request.

Question? Call us at 301-228-3764 or email at TwoFrogsHealingCenter@gmail.com.
We look forward to seeing you in our new space!

Thanks,

Greg