Jul 29 16

How These Four Herbs Help to Stop Bartonella Rage and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

by Greg

For people who have been diagnosed with Bartonella that have severe anger and obsessive compulsive behaviors
by Greg Lee

A few months ago I got a surprise call from my credit card provider who asked if I had made a recent $900 purchase from a clothing store in New York. I told them that I didn’t. They also asked about other charges made in shops and restaurants in the same area. Somehow my credit card number was stolen and being used. Several charges had accumulated in a short period of time before the card was canceled.

How is a thief that buys stuff on your credit card just like anger and obsessive behaviors caused by a Bartonella infection?

Just like fraudulent credit card charges that are made without your knowledge, Bartonella can quietly infect organs and tissues throughout the body

Bartonella is a Gram-negative bacterial infection that can be transmitted by insect bites, including fleas, lice, sand flies[1], flea feces,[2] mites[3], and possibly by ticks[4], spiders[5], or bed bugs[6]. This infection may also be transmitted by infected animal bites[7], scratches[8], or possibly by blood transfusion[9] or organ transplant[10].  There are over thirty species of Bartonella, and seventeen of these can infect humans[11]. This bacteria has been found to infect the liver, lymph nodes, skin[12], teeth[13], bones, heart, spleen, eyes, kidney, and brain[14]. This infection manipulates the circulatory system to spread through the body.

Bartonella stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to invade the body

VEGF is produced in the body to stimulate the production of new blood vessels[15]. In one study that looked at two species of Bartonella henselae, genotype I, aka Houston-1, and II, aka Marseille strain, genotype I was more virulent in human cells due to it’s ability to increase VEGF production and it’s receptor VEGFR-2 in human microvascular endothelial cells[16]. As new blood vessels grow due to VEGF production, Bartonella is then able to infect and spread through the endothelial cell lining of these new vessels[17]. Antibiotics are often the first course of treatment.

Antibiotics are highly effective in killing Bartonella in the lab but not as effective in people

In multiple lab studies, Bartonella was successfully eliminated using these antibiotics: amoxycillin and ceftriaxone, aminoglycosides, doxycycline, rifampicin, erythromycin doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin[18]. However, treatment failures and relapses have been reported with rifampin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, and azithromycin[19]. One reason for these failures may be due to resistant strains of Bartonella to antibiotics: quinolones[20], rifampin[21], macrolides[22], fluoroquinolones[23], and gentamicin[24]. Another reason for antibiotic treatment failure may be due to this bacterias ability to produce or to hide within a protective slime called a biofilm. In one study, B. quintana was discovered in a exopolysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, i.e. bioflm, in lice feces[25]. Biofilms are believed to increase drug resistance up to a thousand times[26]. This infection can produce a wide variety of physical and emotional symptoms.

Bartonella can produce many symptoms including anger, rage and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) behaviors
A Bartonella infection can produce symptoms of anemia[27], frequent headaches, visual and auditory hallucinations, anxiety, vision loss, paralysis, facial palsy, chronic insomnia, seizures, dizziness, cognitive dysfunction, and memory loss[28]. It has been found to mimic symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS)[29], stroke[30], vasculitis[31], breast tumors, pancreatic, biliary or pharyngeal cancer[32], and rheumatic disease[33]. One Lyme literate specialist reports anger, rage and obsessive compulsive behavior in her Bartonella patients[34]. Obsessive behavior may be associated with a reaction in a specific area of the brain.

A specific region of the brain called the basal ganglia is associated with obsessive compulsive behavior

Obsessive compulsive behaviors are a signature symptom in children diagnosed with Pediatric Autoimmune Disorders Associated with Strep (PANDAS). In children with PANDAs, an infection by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), toxins, or inflammation stimulates an autoimmune reaction in the basal ganglia area of the brain[35]. This reaction produces obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) behaviors[36]. In one study, 19% of Bartonella patients showed lesions on brain MRIs in the cerebral white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus, and gray matter[37]. If Bartonella can produce abnormal MRI lesions in the basal ganglia, then it may be capable of producing OCD behaviors similar to a PANDAS infection.

What else can help you to stop a resistant Bartonella infection that produces angry outbursts, rage, or obsessive compulsive behaviors?

In Chinese medicine, anger, rage, and compulsive behaviors are associated with an imbalance in the liver

In Chinese medicine, when the liver becomes too hot or too dry due to excess toxins, a person may exhibit symptoms of sudden anger or rage[38]. A Chinese medicine diagnosis of liver stagnation, also known as congestion, along with a spleen deficiency is associated with OCD behaviors[39]. Obsessive compulsive behaviors have also been identified in people with toxic parasitic infections called Gu Syndrome in Chinese medicine texts[40]. Some patients with obsessive behaviors report a need to have their environment in a precise order by putting things in a specific place, extreme anxiety over unexpected surprises that disrupt daily rituals, or thoughts like, “Did I lock the door?” that they worry about over and over again. Fortunately, there are four herbs which may help to reduce obsessive behaviors, inhibit VEGF production, and lower rage by cooling and moistening the liver.

Here are four herbs for stopping Bartonella from spreading and causing painful emotions

Limiting VEGF production may help to stop Bartonella from spreading. Harmonizing the liver is a Chinese medicine strategy for lowering rage and obsessive compulsive behaviors. Formulating remedies into microparticles called liposomes increases their penetration into endothelial cells[41] where Bartonella hides out, the liver[42], and the basal ganglia[43] Liposomal remedies have also been effective at reducing the production of VEGF[44] and its receptor VEGFR2[45], which may help to limit the virulence of Bartonella. These herbs have been used for centuries in traditional medicine formulas for treating angry outbursts, rage, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) behavior.

Stopping Bartonella Rage and OCD Herb #1: Angelica sinensis

Angelica sinensis, Chinese name Dang Gui, has antimicrobial, neuro-protective, anticancer, anticoagulant, and liver-protective properties. In Chinese medicine, angelica is used to strengthen and replenish the blood and it’s used to treat anemia, pale complexion, dry hair, dizziness, blurred vision, fatigue and weakness, palpitations and pain[46]. It is a primary ingredient in multiple Chinese herbal formulas for reducing angry outbursts or rage due to a liver imbalance[47] called liver yin deficiency or liver fire blazing.

In a lab study, angelica was effective at reducing VEGF[48]. In another study, angelica was effective at increasing cognitive abilities and brain plasticity of rats when under chronic stress[49]. Angelica also has demonstrated anti-endotoxin properties in multiple animal studies[50]. This herb has demonstrated an inhibitory effect on Salmonella typhi, E. coli, Corynebacterium diptheriae, Vibrio cholerae, alpha-hemolytic streptococcus, and beta-hemolytic streptococcus[51]. Another herb that is often used with angelica is peony.

Stopping Bartonella Rage and OCD Herb #2: White peony root

White peony root, Chinese name Bai Shao, has anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, CNS calming, and digestion healing properties. In Chinese medicine, white peony is used to nourish the blood, treat anemia, regulate menstrual disorders, relieve pain, reduce night sweats, nourish, cool and soften the liver[52]. A compound found in white peony called total glucosides was effective in reducing the abnormal proliferation of VEGF in a rat study[53]. Paeoniflorin, another component of white peony, demonstrated liver protective[54] and anti-endotoxin[55] properties in multiple animal studies. Albiflorin, another compound in white peony, demonstrated similar anti-inflammatory properties compared to paeoniflorin[56].

This herb has shown to have an inhibitory effect against Bacillus dysenteriae, E. Coli, Salmonella typhi, Pseudonomas aeruginosa, Staphyloccus aureus, beta-hemolytic streptococcus, and Diplococcus pneumoniae[57]. Peony is often paired with angelica in herbal formulas for treating liver imbalances, including those that are marked by irritation, rage, and angry outbursts[58]. Bupleurum is another herb used in traditional Chinese medicine for supporting the liver.

Stopping Bartonella Rage and OCD Herb #3: Bupleurum

Bupleurum, Chinese name Chai Hu, has pathogen expelling, anti-malarial, liver harmonizing, and yang lifting properties. In Chinese medicine, bupleurum is used to treat infections with symptoms of fever, chills, fullness in the chest, bitter taste in the mouth, dry throat, poor appetite, nausea, vertigo, and irritability. This herb is often used to treat malaria, emotional distress, eye disorders, breast swelling and pain, irregular menstruation, jaundice, migraines, and prolapsed organs[59]. In Chinese herbal formulas, this herb is used to release anger and frustration that is inexpressible[60].

This herb has an inhibitory effect on B-hemolytic streptococcus, Vibrio cholerae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, leptospirosis (a spirochete infection), influenza viruses, and hepatitus viruses Buplerum is cautioned in patients with excessive dryness and heat symptoms. There may an increased risk of acute pneumonitis when this herb is used with interferon[61]. Polysaccharides found in this herb have anti-toxin properties[62]. Bupleurum reduced depression in one human study by increasing Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)[63]. In a rat study, an herbal formula with bupleurum was effective at reducing inflammatory cytokines causing jaundice and liver hepatitis[64]. Bupleurum is a component with angelica and white peony in a famous formula called “Rambling Powder” to treat liver stagnation[65]. Withania somnifera is another herb for calming the emotions.

Stopping Bartonella Rage and OCD Herb #4: Withania somnifera

Withania somnifera, also called ashwagandha, has a very revered place in ayurvedic medicine. It’s properties are tonifying, replenishing, longevity enhancing, adaptogenic, stress reducing, anti-tumor, neuroregenerative, anti-arthritic, aphrodisiac, narcotic, diuretic, anthelmintic, astringent, thermogenic, and stimulant[66].

Withania somnifera has been used to treat the following conditions: arthritis, inflammatory conditions, anxiety, insomnia, respiratory disorders, asthma, and bronchitis. It is also used to treat disorders of the nervous, immune, and the reproductive system. It is especially used to treat nervousness, depression, digestion problems, and low libido[67]. This herb has also been used to treat gastric ulcers, uterine fibroids, dementia, memory problems, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s disease, mitochondrial energy depletion, rheumatoid, and osteoarthritis[68].

In one mouse study, Withania somnifera was effective at inhibiting obsessive compulsive behavior[69]. In a rat study, Withania somnifera demonstrated liver protective and anti-inflammatory effects against gentamicin liver damage[70]. This herb was also effective in multiple studies against Staphylococcus aureus, Methicilin Resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)[71], Enterococcus spp.[72], Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Citrobacter freundii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae[73], Aeromonas hydrophila[74], Plasmodium berghei[75], Linoleic and oleic acids from Withania somnifera were effective at inhibiting streptococcus mutans biofilms[76]. Withaferin A and withanone are compounds found in this herb that show inhibitiatory potential against leshmania protozoa[77]. Withaferin A also inhibited the production of H. pylori induced inflammatory compound IL-1beta[78], MMP-9[79] produced by metastatic cancer cells, and VEGF produced by brain cancer cells[80] in lab experiments. Using a combination of these herbs can help to fight the uncomfortable emotions triggered by a Bartonella infection.

These four herbs can help to reduce painful emotions of rage and obsessive compulsive behaviors from a Bartonella infection

People with Lyme disease that have uncontrolled anger, rage and obsessive behaviors may have a stealthy Bartonella infection affecting their liver and nervous system. Similar to canceling a credit card with fraudulent charges, these herbs may help to stop the spread of Bartonella through inhibiting VEGF. By harmonizing and decongesting the liver, these herbs may help to reduce angry outbursts and obsessive compulsive behaviors. Using liposomal anti-Bartonella herbs may be more effective in stopping Bartonella inside the liver, the basal ganglia in the brain, and in endothelial cells. Since some of these herbs have cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday August 1st at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing from Lyme disease and co-infection symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to stop angry outbursts, rage, or obsessive compulsive behaviors due to a Bartonella infection? Tell us about it.


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[56]Wang, Qiang-Song, Teng Gao, Yuan-Lu Cui, Li-Na Gao, and Heng-Li Jiang. “Comparative Studies of Paeoniflorin and Albiflorin from Paeonia Lactiflora on Anti-Inflammatory Activities.” Pharmaceutical Biology 52, no. 9 (September 2014): 1189–95. doi:10.3109/13880209.2014.880490. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24646307

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[59]Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. Chinese Medical Herbology & Pharmacology. Edited by Laraine Crampton. 1st edition. City of Industry, Calif: Art of Medicine Press, 2004. pp. 84-87.

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[62]Wu, Jian, Yun-Yi Zhang, Li Guo, Hong Li, and Dao-Feng Chen. “Bupleurum Polysaccharides Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation via Modulating Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.” PloS One 8, no. 10 (2013): e78051. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078051. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24167596

[63]Wang, Xia, Qing Feng, Yong Xiao, and Ping Li. “Radix Bupleuri Ameliorates Depression by Increasing Nerve Growth Factor and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor.” International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine 8, no. 6 (2015): 9205–17. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26309578

[64]Lin, L., W. M. Cai, C. J. Qin, L. C. Miao, L. T. Yun, Y. Hua, and L. Weilin. “Intervention of TLR4 Signal Pathway Cytokines in Severe Liver Injury with Obstructive Jaundice in Rats.” International Journal of Sports Medicine 33, no. 7 (July 2012): 572–79. doi:10.1055/s-0031-1301318. Lin, L., W. M. Cai, C. J. Qin, L. C. Miao, L. T. Yun, Y. Hua, and L. Weilin. “Intervention of TLR4 Signal Pathway Cytokines in Severe Liver Injury with Obstructive Jaundice in Rats.” International Journal of Sports Medicine 33, no. 7 (July 2012): 572–79. doi:10.1055/s-0031-1301318. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22562737

[65]Beau. “Psychospiritual Aspects of Herbal Medicine.” Accessed July 28, 2016. https://www.planetherbs.com/theory/psychospiritual-aspects-of-herbal-medicine.html.

[66]Singh, Narendra, Mohit Bhalla, Prashanti de Jager, and Marilena Gilca. “An Overview on Ashwagandha: A Rasayana (Rejuvenator) of Ayurveda.” African Journal of Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative Medicines 8, no. 5 Suppl (July 3, 2011): 208–13. doi:10.4314/ajtcam.v8i5S.9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252722/

[67]Beau. “Ashwagandha: Wonder Herb of India.” Accessed July 28, 2016. https://www.planetherbs.com/specific-herbs/ashwagandha-wonder-herb-of-india.html.

[68]Singh, Narendra, Mohit Bhalla, Prashanti de Jager, and Marilena Gilca. “An Overview on Ashwagandha: A Rasayana (Rejuvenator) of Ayurveda.” African Journal of Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative Medicines 8, no. 5 Suppl (July 3, 2011): 208–13. doi:10.4314/ajtcam.v8i5S.9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252722/

[69]Kaurav, Bhanu P. S., Manish M. Wanjari, Amol Chandekar, Nagendra Singh Chauhan, and Neeraj Upmanyu. “Influence of Withania Somnifera on Obsessive Compulsive Disorder in Mice.” Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine 5, no. 5 (May 2012): 380–84. doi:10.1016/S1995-7645(12)60063-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22546655

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[71]Mwitari, Peter G., Peter A. Ayeka, Joyce Ondicho, Esther N. Matu, and Christine C. Bii. “Antimicrobial Activity and Probable Mechanisms of Action of Medicinal Plants of Kenya: Withania Somnifera, Warbugia Ugandensis, Prunus Africana and Plectrunthus Barbatus.” PLoS ONE 8, no. 6 (June 13, 2013). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065619. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3681961/

[72]Bisht, Punum, and Vinita Rawat. “Antibacterial Activity of Withania Somnifera against Gram-Positive Isolates from Pus Samples.” Ayu 35, no. 3 (September 2014): 330–32. doi:10.4103/0974-8520.153757. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25972723

[73]Alam, Nadia, Monzur Hossain, Md Abdul Mottalib, Siti Amrah Sulaiman, Siew Hua Gan, and Md Ibrahim Khalil. “Methanolic Extracts of Withania Somnifera Leaves, Fruits and Roots Possess Antioxidant Properties and Antibacterial Activities.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 12 (October 7, 2012): 175. doi:10.1186/1472-6882-12-175. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3527235/

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[77]Grover, Abhinav, Shashank Prakash Katiyar, Jeyaraman Jeyakanthan, Vikash Kumar Dubey, and Durai Sundar. “Blocking Protein Kinase C Signaling Pathway: Mechanistic Insights into the Anti-Leishmanial Activity of Prospective Herbal Drugs from Withania Somnifera.” BMC Genomics 13 Suppl 7 (2012): S20. doi:10.1186/1471-2164-13-S7-S20. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23281834

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Jul 8 16

Is Memory Loss Caused by Neurological Lyme Disease or Brain Eating Parasites?

by Greg

wasp_nest

For people with neurological Lyme disease that have dementia, multiple sclerosis, or Alzheimer’s disease
by Greg Lee
.
One afternoon, I heard one of my daughters cry out with a huge scream after a wasp stung her arm. After she was taken care of, I got out my wasp fighting gear: electric bug zapper, thick gloves, hat, and a bottle of hair spray. You may be asking, “Why hair spray?” It sticks like glue to the wasp’s wings so they can’t fly and I don’t like pesticides. Once they hurt my girl, then it got personal and they had to go!

So it was me against over a dozen wasps. After zapping and spraying them into submission, I saw one of the wasps crawl into a slot between two deck boards. And then another wasp followed. I cautiously peered into the slot and saw the nest. I got out the garden hose and sprayed that nest until no wasp remained. Then I quickly pried it out and threw it down the sewer. Once the nest was gone, the rest got the message and didn’t return.

How is being stung by angry wasps defending their nest similar to nematodes that infect the brain?

Just like a wasp nest that swarms you, nematodes can infect and damage the brain
Recent research by Dr. Alan MacDonald has found worms called nematodes in autopsy brain tissue samples from patients with neurological Lyme disease who were also diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, dementia, brain tumors, and Alzheimer’s Disease[1]. Lyme disease bacteria were actually detected within some of the nematodes. Similar to how wasps can hide in their nest, Lyme bacteria can hide from antibiotic treatment when they are inside of larger parasitic worms. Unfortunately, nematodes have also been detected in ticks.

In deer ticks and lone star ticks, nematodes have been detected
In multiple tick studies, nematodes have been detected in lone star ticks found in Maryland[2] and Virginia[3], and in deer ticks from Connecticut[4]. Ticks are capable of transmitting nematodes when they feed on a host[5]. Other vectors that can transmit nematodes are mosquitoes and black flies[6]. Once they infect a host, adult nematodes mate and then release thousands of very small larva called “microfilariae” into the blood. Microfilariae circulate throughout the host and can end up in the nervous system[7]. These microfilariae evolve into larvae which can eat through the brain and can cause a wide range of symptoms.

Nematodes produce many symptoms when they infect the brain and spinal fluid
Larval nematodes in the nervous system can damage tissues and produce masses called granulomas. They can also cause fibrosis, blockages in cerebral blood vessels, or inflammation resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammation[8], weakness, blurred vision, stomach flu[9], and even death. In a Taiwan study, patients infected with nematodes reported meningitis, brain inflammation, fever, vomiting, headache, and neuropathy. Two patients died from their infection. In some patients, nematodes were recovered from their cerebral-spinal fluid (CSF). Elevated levels of inflammatory markers vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) were also detected in patient’s CSF fluid[10]. Research shows that nematodes can also manipulate the immune system response.

Nematodes produce compounds to deflect how the immune system attacks parasites
One research study on a nematode called B. Malayi, identified proteins that it releases to manipulate the immune response in favor of a parasitic infection[11]. Another study on a filarial nematode infection illustrated how these parasites inhibit the inflammatory response by the immune system[12]. In most cases, anti-parasitic medications are used to treat nematode infections in the nervous system.

Anti-parasitic medications help to kill nematode infections in the brain and spinal fluid
Anti-parasitic medications called antihelminthics are used to treat nematodes in the nervous system including: Mebendazole, Pyrantel pamoate, Thiabendazole, Diethylcarbamazine (DEC), Ivermectin[13], Moxidectin[14], and Alinia[15]. Ivermectin and moxidectin are the most widely administrated antihelminthic medications for nematode infections and unfortunately, their widespread and frequent use has led to high level of resistance to these drugs[16]. Ivermectin only kills the microfilariae, not the adult nematode[17]. DEC can worsen onchocercal nematode eye infections. In patients with a nematode infection called loiasis, DEC can cause serious adverse reactions, including encephalopathy and death, depending upon the density of the parasites. DEC is only available in the US from the CDC upon submitting positive lab results[18]. A mechanism within nematodes called a “drug effux pump” is believed to enable these parasites to develop drug resistance[19]. Killing nematodes can lead to significant Herxheimer reactions.

A symbiotic bacteria within nematodes is the source of Herxheimer toxins
Wolbachia is a symbiotic bacteria which enables normal development and fertility of nematodes[20]. Wolbachia belong to the order Rickettsiales and is closely related to Anaplasma, Ehrlichia and Rickettsia[21]. Fortunately, this bacteria does not infect people. When nematodes are killed off by anti-parasitic drugs, Wolbachia cannot survive without their host and are killed, which releases their endotoxins. Wolbachia toxins stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory compounds including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF)-alpha, Interleukin-1 (IL-1), and Interleukin-12 (IL-12)[22]. In an animal study, Wolbachia surface protein upregulated (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor[23]. These endotoxins and inflammatory compounds can produce painful symptoms associated with a Herxheimer reaction. A combination of anti-parasitic and antibiotic medications is more effective at reducing adult and microfilariae forms of nematodes.

A combination of medications which kill both the adult and microfilariae forms is more effective
Recent drug strategies combine Ivermectin for microfilariae and doxycycline to kill Wolbachia which eventually kills the adult nematodes in the nervous system. This combination drug treatment is recommended for six weeks[24]. Another animal study combined DEC with liposomal doxycycline and liposomal rifampin resulting in significant increase in microfilariae die off and a marginal increase in the die off of adult nematodes[25]. Other studies demonstrate the inhibitory effect of anti-Rickettsia antibiotics like tetracycline, rifampin, and azithromyacin on adult nematodes[26].

What else can help people to expel brain-eating nematodes from their central nervous system who have persistent neurological Lyme disease, multiple sclerosis, dementia, brain tumors, or Alzheimer’s disease?

Here are four strategies for expelling brain-eating nematodes from the central nervous system
A combination of remedies for attacking both the adult and microfilariae forms is the most effective at reducing the overall numbers of parasites. Formulating remedies into microparticles called liposomes enhances the efficacy of anti-parasitic herbs and essential oils for killing the different life stages of nematodes[27] and possibly their symbiotic bacteria.

Clearing Brain-Eating Nematodes Strategy #1: Essential Oils
Essential oils have been found to inhibit different species of nematodes.

Thyme essential oil was effective at inhibiting Meloydogine javanica[28] and larvae from the Anisakis nematode[29]. Thyme essential oil was also effective against gram negative bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa[30], Salmonella spp.[31], and E. Coli[32]. Thyme combined with oregano oil reduced mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNFalpha[33].

Palmarosa essential oil was effective against Caenorhabditis elegans[34] and Haemonchus contortus[35] in separate studies. This oil was also effective at inhibiting E. Coli[36] and Aspergillus fumigatus[37]. Palmarosa oil also reduced pro-inflammatory compounds TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8[38] and increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 in lab studies[39].

Clove bud essential oil was highly effective at reducing[40] Meloidogyne incognita egg hatch 50% and killing second stage juveniles (J2) as much as 100% in a lab study[41]. Eugenol, the primary compound in clove bud oil, in one rat study reduced expression of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9[42], which are elevated in nematode infections. Processing these oils into a liposomal micronized form increases their penetration into the nervous system[43]. Adding nanoparticles of silver to liposomal oils may further enhance their anti-microbial properties.

Clearing Brain-Eating Nematodes Strategy #2: Nanoparticle Silver
In multiple lab studies, nanoparticles of silver were effective at reducing motility and killing microfilariae of Brugia malayi[44], demonstrated antifilarial activity against microfilaria of S. Cervi[45], disrupted metabolism of Caenorhabditis elegans[46], and killed most of Meloidogyne incognita[47]. Encapsulating nanoparticles of silver along with essential oils into a liposomal remedy may increase their anti-parasitic and anti-symbiotic bacterial properties. When nanoparticle silver is combined with tea tree essential oil into a liposome, their antimicrobial efficiency is enhanced against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans[48]. Silver nanoparticles may reduce inflammation from nematodes by inhibiting IL-1beta and VEGF induced permeability as reported in a pig study[49] and reducing MMP-2 and MMP-9 in another rat study[50]. Herbs have also been effective for treating nematode infections for thousands of years.

Clearing Brain-Eating Nematodes Strategy #3: Herbs
In addition to essential oils and silver, herbs have been used for centuries for fighting nematode infections.

Andrographis, Chinese name Chuan Xin Lian, has been effective at inhibiting Haemonchus contortus[51], microfilaricidal activity against Dirofilaria immitis filarids[52], antifilarial activity against adult worms of subperiodic Brugia malayi[53], killing in vitro the microfilaria of Dipetalonema reconditum in dogs[54], and anthelmintic activity against Ascaris lumbricoides[55]. This herb is also used in Chinese medicine against leptospirosis, another spirochete infection[56]. Andrographis was also effective at reducing inflammatory compounds IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a lab study[57]. A compound in Andrographis called andrographolide inhibits expression of inflammatory compounds MMP-2, IL-1beta[58] and VEGF[59] in lab studies.

Ajowan, ajwain, or Trachyspermum ammi has been effective against multiple species of nematodes in multiple studies. Methanolic extract of fruits of Trachyspermum ammi were effective against adult bovine filarial Setaria digitata worms and demonstrated macrofilaricidal activity and female worm sterility in vivo against B. Malayi[60].

Lantana camara is an ornamental shrub which is very hardy and is used medicinally through much of the world. This herb contains triterpenoids pomolic acid, lantanolic acid, lantoic acid, camarin, lantacin, camarinin, and ursolic acid which exhibited 100% mortality in 24 – 48 hours against the nematode Meloidogyne incognita[61]. In other studies, a lantana extract killed adult Brugia malayi nematodes and sterilized many of the surviving female worms, and demonstrated strong microfilaricidal and sterilization efficacy with mild macrofilaricidal action against Acanthocheilonema viteae[62]. Not only herbs, but also tiny electrical frequencies can help to stop nematodes that have infected the brain and spinal fluid.

Clearing Brain-Eating Nematodes Strategy #4: Frequency Specific Microcurrent
Frequency Specific Microcurrent uses millionth of an amp electrical currents to reduce parasitic and bacterial infections, toxins and inflammation[63]. Frequencies for inhibiting parasitic worms, symbiotic bacteria, neutralizing toxins and inflammation, reducing tumors, and promoting healing are paired with frequencies to target infected areas of the nervous system: the brain, forebrain, meninges, basal ganglia, spinal cord, spinal fluid, cranial nerves, and eyes[64]. These paired frequencies have also been helpful in reducing symptoms in patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, autism, brain inflammation, mold toxicity, and neurological Lyme disease. These four strategies may help people with neurological Lyme to stop an underlying parasitic nematode brain infection.

A combination of anti-parasitic remedies and treatments can help to overcome a chronic neurological Lyme and nematode infection
People diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, or brain tumors may have hidden parasitic nematodes along with Lyme disease in their nervous system. Just like finding and eliminating the wasp nest, expelling parasitic nematodes that harbor Lyme bacteria may help to improve neurological symptoms and memory recall. Using liposomal anti-parasitic and anti-symbiotic bacteria remedies and treatments may be effective in eliminating larger parasites and the Lyme bacteria they contain.

Anti-toxin treatments and remedies may also help with reducing inflammatory compounds which may lower toxic Herxheimer pain and discomfort. Making these remedies into micronized liposomes enhances their delivery into the nervous system and may increase their anti-nematode effectiveness. Since some of these treatments and remedies require specialized training, work with a Lyme literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday July 11th at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing from Lyme disease and co-infection symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to overcome memory problems caused by brain-eating parasites or a Lyme disease infection? Tell us about it.


[1] “Borrelia Dwells in Parasitic Nematodes in Glioma & Neurodegenerative Disease.” Dr. Paul Duray Research Fellowship Endowment Inc, May 14, 2016. https://durayresearch.wordpress.com/borrelia-dwells-in-parasitic-nematodes-in-neurodegenerative-disease/.

[2] Zhang, Xing, Douglas E. Norris, and Jason L. Rasgon. “Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Wolbachia Endosymbionts and Filarial Nematodes in Maryland Populations of the Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma Americanum).” FEMS Microbiology Ecology 77, no. 1 (July 2011): 50–56. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01089.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4118304/
[3] Henning, Tyler C., John M. Orr, Joshua D. Smith, Jorge R. Arias, Jason L. Rasgon, and Douglas E. Norris. “Discovery of Filarial Nematode DNA in Amblyomma Americanum in Northern Virginia.” Ticks and Tick-Borne Diseases 7, no. 2 (March 2016): 315–18. doi:10.1016/j.ttbdis.2015.11.007. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4876860/
[4] Namrata, Pabbati, Jamie M. Miller, Madari Shilpa, Patlolla Raghavender Reddy, Cheryl Bandoski, Michael J. Rossi, and Eva Sapi. “Filarial Nematode Infection in Ixodes Scapularis Ticks Collected from Southern Connecticut.” Veterinary Sciences 1, no. 1 (May 12, 2014): 5–15. doi:10.3390/vetsci1010005. http://www.mdpi.com/2306-7381/1/1/5
[5] Balashov, Iu S. “[The interrelationships of ixodid ticks (Ixodidae) with the causative agents of transmissible vertebrate infections].” Parazitologiia 29, no. 5 (October 1995): 337–52. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8524614
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May 31 16

How These Five Remedies Stop Persistent Gut Problems Caused by Listeria in People with Lyme Disease

by Greg

hitchhiker_seeds

For people with Lyme disease that have recurring digestion problems, leaky gut, or small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
by Greg Lee

I used to play football and baseball with other neighborhood boys at Mr. Johnson’s field. Occasionally we’d have to go looking for one of our balls at the far end of the field which had tall grass and weeds. Sometimes I’d come out with “hitchhiker” weed seeds clinging to my clothes.

How are hitchhiker seeds similar to people with Lyme disease that have chronic digestion problems?

Just like seeds that sneak on to your clothes, Listeria can be a dangerous pathogen which sneaks into the intestines
In several different recalls of food products, Listeria monocytogenes was cited as a contaminant in multiple food processing plants which produce frozen food, fruit, ice cream, cheese, and sunflower seeds. In another incidence, Listeria was found in whole cantaloupes that ended up sickening 147 people and resulted in 43 fatalities[1]. According to one CDC report, Listeria can be fatal in 21% of cases[2] even despite early antibiotic treatment[3]. Fatality may be as high as 40-60% in patients with a central nervous system infection and concurrent debilitating disease[4]. People over 65, pregnant women and especially their unborn children, and immune compromised patients like people with chronic Lyme or co-infections are at greater risk. Fortunately, the risk of getting a Listeria infection is low, about 2-3 people per million in the US. However, the risk is greater in immune compromised people, even at low doses of Listeria contamination on food[5]. This infection usually starts with symptoms in the digestion system.

Listeria often presents with bloating, nausea, and diarrhea
This infection can produce symptoms of fever and muscle aches, sometimes preceded by diarrhea or other gastrointestinal symptoms. In 55-70% of cases, Listeria can affect the central nervous system (CNS)[6].  When Listeria spreads beyond the digestion tract, it can produce symptoms of headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, convulsions, meningitis, septicemia, and death[7]. Some immune compromised patients may not have any symptoms. Listeria employs multiple methods to spread through unsuspecting people.

Listeria uses multiple methods to help it to spread through the body
The first line of defense against food borne Listeria are the endothelial cells which line the intestines. Listeria employs multiple strategies to invade several different types of cells and spread through the body: intestinal epithelial cells, hepatocytes, placental cytotrophoblasts, endothelial cells, macrophages and other immune cells[8]. In one lab study, listeriolysin O (LLO) is a toxin produced by Listeria which enables it to move freely inside of and to propagate between endothelial cells[9]. This toxin also disables “T” cells which enable this bacteria to evade the immune system and survive longer[10]. Listeria has also developed drug resistance to multiple antibiotics.

Listeria can persist due to drug resistance to many antibiotics
Unfortunately, mutant strains of Listeria have developed resistance to several antibiotics including: ampicillin, cephalothin, penicillin, meticillin, oxacillin[11],  tetracycline, streptomycin, cefotaxime, and gentamicin[12]. Listeria uses a mechanism called an effux pump to sample drug molecules to develop drug-resistance[13]. This bacteria can also produce biofilms under which many species of pathogens may live, which suggests that Listeria is likely capable of long-term infection in the gut[14]. In one study on sanitizers, Listeria under a biofilm demonstrated increased resistance of 1000 times[15]. In another lab study, Listeria has also been shown to be capable of receiving drug resistant genes from other bacteria that contaminate food[16]. Unfortunately, some Lyme disease patients with chronic digestion problems have tested positive for resonant frequencies for Listeria in their intestines.

What else can help people with Lyme disease to fight a drug-resistant, biofilm forming, intracellular Listeria gut and central nervous system infection?

Here are five strategies for stopping Listeria infections in the gut and the central nervous system
Here are four strategies for helping to stop Listeria from spreading. Making remedies into a small particle size can increase their anti-Listeria properties. When anti-Listeria medicines were processed into small particles and wrapped with a lipid or a fat outer layer called a liposome, they had a 90-fold greater effect at killing the intracellular infection in mice[17]. Liposomal remedies have been shown to be more effective at penetrating and delivering remedies into Listeria infected cells than their non-liposomal equivalents[18]. In other studies, herbs, specific frequencies of light, and dietary changes inhibited Listeria.

Listeria Stopping Strategy #1: Essential Oils
In one lab study, five plant essential oils: bay, clove, cinnamon, nutmeg and thyme significantly reduced the toxin listeriolysin O[19], which can help to prevent Listeria monocytogenes from spreading through the body. In another lab study, nanoemulsions of anise oil were more effective at inhibiting Listeria than anise essential oil[20]. Other lab studies indicated the effectiveness of oregano[21], lemongrass[22], spearmint[23], clove[24], myrtle[25], ajowan[26], orange[27], peppermint[28], geranium[29], artemisia annua[30], cinnamon Chinese cassia, red thyme[31], lemon and cinnamon[32] essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes. In lab experiments, thyme and oregano[33] essential oils were also effective at eliminating the biofilm forms of Listeria. Encapsulation the oils in liposomes, increases their effectiveness at targeting intracellular L. monocytogenes in endothelial cells[34] and the central nervous system[35]. Not only oils can help with stopping Listeria, so can specific wavelengths of light.

Listeria Stopping Strategy #2: Light Therapy
Light Emitting Diode (LED) frequencies of 405 nm[36] and 461 nm[37] inactivated L. monocytogenes in multiple lab experiments. Applying these wavelengths to the skin may help with stopping a cutaneous Listeria[38] infection. In studies on the penetration depth of laser wavelengths of 405 nm, this frequency was able to penetrate to a depth of 0.08 mm with 55% transmission into fair colored skin, and 2.5% in darker skin[39]. In addition to light, herbs can also help with stopping Listeria.

Listeria Stopping Strategy #3: Herbs
In addition to essential oils and light frequencies, these herb extracts have anti-Listeria properties in one study: rosemary, Echinacea angustifolia, thyme, tea tree, and peppermint[40]. In other studies, green tea was effective at inhibiting Listeria in food[41]. A green tea compound called epigallocatechin gallate (ECGC) was also effective at inhibiting the intracellular growth of L. Monocytogenes in a macrophage study[42]. Processing these herbs into small particle liposomes enhances their ability to penetrate and stop intracellular Listeria[43] and potentially disrupt it’s biofilms[44]. Not only herbs, but also tiny electrical frequencies can help to stop a Listeria infection.

Listeria Stopping Strategy #4: Frequency Specific Microcurrent
Frequency Specific Microcurrent uses millionth of an amp electrical currents to reduce bacterial infections, toxins and inflammation[45]. Frequencies for reducing pathogens, neutralizing toxins and inflammation, and promoting healing are combined with frequencies to target Listeria hiding inside blood cells[46], and organs like the intestines[47], liver, spleen[48], and the central nervous system[49]. These paired frequencies have been helpful in reducing symptoms in patients with meningitis, headaches, and confusion. In addition to microcurrent, dietary changes can also help to fight Listeria.

Listeria Stopping Strategy #5: Dietary Changes
In multiple studies, these foods and supplements inhibited the growth of Listeria: virgin olive oil[50], zinc and isomeric vitamin A[51], feijoa fruit extract from New Zealand[52], Lactobacilus[53] and Bifidobacterium[54] probiotics. Eliminating alcohol intake may also help with boosting the strength of your innate immunity against Listeria[55]. Multiple strategies can help people with Lyme to stop a persistent Listeria gut or brain infection.

A combination of anti-Listeria strategies can help to resolve a chronic gastrointestinal problems or infections in people with Lyme disease
Similar to taking the hitchhiking seeds off your clothes, anti-Listeria remedies and treatments may help to resolve chronic digestion problem, gut infections and meningitis. Processing these oils and herbs into a small particle liposome can enhance their antimicrobial, antibiofilm properties, and ability to penetrate inside cells and into the central nervous system. Some patients will also take these oils or herb extracts in an enema to increase their delivery into the intestines. Since some of these oils and herbs have cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday June 6th at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing from Lyme disease and co-infection symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to overcome chronic gut problems caused by a toxic Listeria infection? Tell us about it.



[1] “Multistate Outbreak of Listeriosis Linked to Whole Cantaloupes from Jensen Farms, Colorado | Listeria | CDC.” Accessed May 21, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/outbreaks/cantaloupes-jensen-farms/index.html.

[2] “Vital Signs: Listeria Illnesses, Deaths, and Outbreaks — United States, 2009–2011.” Accessed May 21, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6222a4.htm.

[3] Vázquez-Boland, José A., Michael Kuhn, Patrick Berche, Trinad Chakraborty, Gustavo Domínguez-Bernal, Werner Goebel, Bruno González-Zorn, Jürgen Wehland, and Jürgen Kreft. “Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants.” Clinical Microbiology Reviews 14, no. 3 (July 2001): 584–640. doi:10.1128/CMR.14.3.584-640.2001. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88991/#B422

[4] Vázquez-Boland, et al. “Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88991/#

[5] Vázquez-Boland, et al. “Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88991/#

[6] Vázquez-Boland, et al. “Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88991/#

[7] “Definition & Symptoms | Listeria | CDC.” Accessed May 21, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/definition.html.

[8] Vázquez-Boland, José A., Michael Kuhn, Patrick Berche, Trinad Chakraborty, Gustavo Domínguez-Bernal, Werner Goebel, Bruno González-Zorn, Jürgen Wehland, and Jürgen Kreft. “Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants.” Clinical Microbiology Reviews 14, no. 3 (July 2001): 584–640. doi:10.1128/CMR.14.3.584-640.2001. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88991/

[9] Rengarajan, Michelle, Arnold Hayer, and Julie A. Theriot. “Endothelial Cells Use a Formin-Dependent Phagocytosis-Like Process to Internalize the Bacterium Listeria Monocytogenes.” PLoS Pathogens 12, no. 5 (May 6, 2016). doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1005603. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4859537/

[10] Yamamoto, K., I. Kawamura, T. Tominaga, T. Nomura, C. Kohda, J. Ito, and M. Mitsuyama. “Listeriolysin O, a Cytolysin Derived from Listeria Monocytogenes, Inhibits Generation of Ovalbumin-Specific Th2 Immune Response by Skewing Maturation of Antigen-Specific T Cells into Th1 Cells.” Clinical and Experimental Immunology 142, no. 2 (November 2005): 268–74. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2005.02922.x.

[11] Aras, Zeki, and Mustafa Ardıç. “Occurrence and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Listeria Species in Turkey Meats.” Korean Journal for Food Science of Animal Resources 35, no. 5 (2015): 669–73. doi:10.5851/kosfa.2015.35.5.669. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26761896

[12] Li, Lili, Rikke Heidemann Olsen, Lei Ye, Wenyan Wang, Lei Shi, He Yan, and Hecheng Meng. “Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance of Listeria Monocytogenes Strains Isolated from a Pork Processing Plant and Its Respective Meat Markets in Southern China.” Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 13, no. 5 (May 2016): 262–68. doi:10.1089/fpd.2015.2087. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27058266

[13] Soto, Sara M. “Role of Efflux Pumps in the Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria Embedded in a Biofilm.” Virulence 4, no. 3 (April 1, 2013): 223–29. doi:10.4161/viru.23724. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3711980/

[14] Giaouris, Efstathios, Even Heir, Mickaël Desvaux, Michel Hébraud, Trond Møretrø, Solveig Langsrud, Agapi Doulgeraki, et al. “Intra- and Inter-Species Interactions within Biofilms of Important Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens.” Frontiers in Microbiology 6 (August 20, 2015). doi:10.3389/fmicb.2015.00841. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4542319/

[15] Romanova, Nadya A., Purushottam V. Gawande, Lubov Y. Brovko, and Mansel W. Griffiths. “Rapid Methods to Assess Sanitizing Efficacy of Benzalkonium Chloride to Listeria Monocytogenes Biofilms.” Journal of Microbiological Methods 71, no. 3 (December 2007): 231–37. doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2007.09.002. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17928079

[16] Jahan, M., and R. A. Holley. “Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance from Enterococcus Faecium of Fermented Meat Origin to Listeria Monocytogenes and Listeria Innocua.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 62, no. 4 (April 2016): 304–10. doi:10.1111/lam.12553. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26854329

[17] Bakker-Woudenberg, I. A., A. F. Lokerse, J. C. Vink-van den Berg, and F. H. Roerdink. “Liposome-Encapsulated Ampicillin against Listeria Monocytogenes in Vivo and in Vitro.” Infection 16 Suppl 2 (1988): S165–70. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3138190

[18] Ito, M., E. Ishida, F. Tanabe, N. Mori, and S. Shigeta. “Inhibitory Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Penicillin G on Growth of Listeria Monocytogenes in Mouse Macrophages.” The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine 150, no. 3 (November 1986): 281–86. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3103258

[19] Smith-Palmer, A., J. Stewartt, and L. Fyfe. “Inhibition of Listeriolysin O and Phosphatidylcholine-Specific Production in Listeria Monocytogenes by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Plant Essential Oils.” Journal of Medical Microbiology 51, no. 7 (July 2002): 567–74. doi:10.1099/0022-1317-51-7-567. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12132773

[20] Topuz, Osman Kadir, Emin Burçin Özvural, Qin Zhao, Qingrong Huang, Michael Chikindas, and Muharrem Gölükçü. “Physical and Antimicrobial Properties of Anise Oil Loaded Nanoemulsions on the Survival of Foodborne Pathogens.” Food Chemistry 203 (July 15, 2016): 117–23. doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.02.051. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26948596

[21] de Souza, Geany Targino, Rayssa Julliane de Carvalho, Jossana Pereira de Sousa, Josean Fechine Tavares, Donald Schaffner, Evandro Leite de Souza, and Marciane Magnani. “Effects of the Essential Oil from Origanum Vulgare L. on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria in Semihard Cheese Broth and Slurry.” Journal of Food Protection 79, no. 2 (February 2016): 246–52. doi:10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-15-172. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26818985

[22] Leite, Caroline Junqueira Barcellos, Jossana Pereira de Sousa, José Alberto da Costa Medeiros, Maria Lúcia da Conceição, Vivyanne Dos Santos Falcão-Silva, and Evandro Leite de Souza. “Inactivation of Escherichia Coli, Listeria Monocytogenes, and Salmonella Enteritidis by Cymbopogon Citratus D.C. Stapf. Essential Oil in Pineapple Juice.” Journal of Food Protection 79, no. 2 (February 2016): 213–19. doi:10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-15-245. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26818981

[23] Shahbazi, Yasser. “Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha Spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria.” Journal of Pathogens 2015 (2015): 916305. doi:10.1155/2015/916305. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26351584

[24] Mith, Hasika, Rémi Duré, Véronique Delcenserie, Abdesselam Zhiri, Georges Daube, and Antoine Clinquart. “Antimicrobial Activities of Commercial Essential Oils and Their Components against Food-Borne Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria.” Food Science & Nutrition 2, no. 4 (July 2014): 403–16. doi:10.1002/fsn3.116. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25473498

[25] Ben Hsouna, Anis, Naceur Hamdi, Ramzi Miladi, and Slim Abdelkafi. “Myrtus Communis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activities against Food Spoilage Pathogens.” Chemistry & Biodiversity 11, no. 4 (April 2014): 571–80. doi:10.1002/cbdv.201300153. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24706627

[26] Rabiey, Soghra, Hedayat Hosseini, and Masoud Rezaei. “Use Carum Copticum Essential Oil for Controlling the Listeria Monocytogenes Growth in Fish Model System.” Brazilian Journal of Microbiology: [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology] 45, no. 1 (2014): 89–96. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24948918

[27] Irkin, Reyhan, and Mihriban Korukluoglu. “Growth Inhibition of Pathogenic Bacteria and Some Yeasts by Selected Essential Oils and Survival of L. Monocytogenes and C. Albicans in Apple-Carrot Juice.” Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 6, no. 3 (April 2009): 387–94. doi:10.1089/fpd.2008.0195. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19278342

[28] Liang, Rong, Shiqi Xu, Charles F. Shoemaker, Yue Li, Fang Zhong, and Qingrong Huang. “Physical and Antimicrobial Properties of Peppermint Oil Nanoemulsions.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 60, no. 30 (August 1, 2012): 7548–55. doi:10.1021/jf301129k. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22746096

[29] Ghannadi, A., Mr Bagherinejad, D. Abedi, M. Jalali, B. Absalan, and N. Sadeghi. “Antibacterial Activity and Composition of Essential Oils from Pelargonium Graveolens L’Her and Vitex Agnus-Castus L.” Iranian Journal of Microbiology 4, no. 4 (December 2012): 171–76. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23205247

[30] Bilia, Anna Rita, Francesca Santomauro, Cristiana Sacco, Maria Camilla Bergonzi, and Rosa Donato. “Essential Oil of Artemisia Annua L.: An Extraordinary Component with Numerous Antimicrobial Properties.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: eCAM 2014 (2014): 159819. doi:10.1155/2014/159819. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24799936

[31] Dussault, Dominic, Khanh Dang Vu, and Monique Lacroix. “In Vitro Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activities of Various Commercial Essential Oils, Oleoresin and Pure Compounds against Food Pathogens and Application in Ham.” Meat Science 96, no. 1 (January 2014): 514–20. doi:10.1016/j.meatsci.2013.08.015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24012976

[32] Özcan, Gülçin, and Nükhet Nilüfer Demirel Zorba. “Combined Effect of Ultrasound and Essential Oils to Reduce Listeria Monocytogenes on Fresh Produce.” Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnología De Los Alimentos Internacional 22, no. 4 (June 2016): 353–62. doi:10.1177/1082013215604478. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26377335

[33] Desai, Monil A., Kamlesh A. Soni, Ramakrishna Nannapaneni, M. Wes Schilling, and Juan L. Silva. “Reduction of Listeria Monocytogenes Biofilms on Stainless Steel and Polystyrene Surfaces by Essential Oils.” Journal of Food Protection 75, no. 7 (July 2012): 1332–37. doi:10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-517. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22980020

[34] Deno, Sho, Naohiro Takemoto, and Hiroo Iwata. “Introduction of Antioxidant-Loaded Liposomes into Endothelial Cell Surfaces through DNA Hybridization.” Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 22, no. 1 (January 1, 2014): 350–57. doi:10.1016/j.bmc.2013.11.023. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345482

[35] Ohara, Masaru, and Yoshihiko Ohyama. “Delivery and Application of Dietary Polyphenols to Target Organs, Tissues and Intracellular Organelles.” Current Drug Metabolism 15, no. 1 (January 2014): 37–47. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24328691

[36] Kim, Min-Jeong, Marta Mikš-Krajnik, Amit Kumar, Vinayak Ghate, and Hyun-Gyun Yuk. “Antibacterial Effect and Mechanism of High-Intensity 405 ± 5 Nm Light Emitting Diode on Bacillus Cereus, Listeria Monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus Aureus under Refrigerated Condition.” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology 153 (December 2015): 33–39. doi:10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2015.08.032. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26398810

[37] Ghate, Vinayak, Ai Ling Leong, Amit Kumar, Woo Suk Bang, Weibiao Zhou, and Hyun-Gyun Yuk. “Enhancing the Antibacterial Effect of 461 and 521 Nm Light Emitting Diodes on Selected Foodborne Pathogens in Trypticase Soy Broth by Acidic and Alkaline pH Conditions.” Food Microbiology 48 (June 2015): 49–57. doi:10.1016/j.fm.2014.10.014. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25790991

[38] Godshall, Casey E., Gina Suh, and Bennett Lorber. “Cutaneous Listeriosis.” Journal of Clinical Microbiology 51, no. 11 (November 2013): 3591–96. doi:10.1128/JCM.01974-13. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23966491

[39] F. H. Mustafa, M. S. Jaafar. “Comparison of Wavelength-Dependent Penetration Depths of Lasers in Different Types of Skin in Photodynamic Therapy.” Indian Journal of Physics 87, no. 3 (2012). doi:10.1007/s12648-012-0213-0. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/234720204_Comparison_of_wavelength-dependent_penetration_depths_of_lasers_in_different_types_of_skin_in_photodynamic_therapy

[40] M Sandasi, C. M. Leonard. “The in Vitro Antibiofilm Activity of Selected Culinary Herbs and Medicinal Plants against Listeria Monocytogenes.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 50, no. 1 (2009): 30–35. doi:10.1111/j.1472-765X.2009.02747.x. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/38052994_The_in_vitro_antibiofilm_activity_of_selected_culinary_herbs_and_medicinal_plants_against_Listeria_monocytogenes

[41] Lee, Sun-Young, So-Young Gwon, Seung-Ju Kim, and Bo Kyung Moon. “Inhibitory Effect of Commercial Green Tea and Rosemary Leaf Powders on the Growth of Foodborne Pathogens in Laboratory Media and Oriental-Style Rice Cakes.” Journal of Food Protection 72, no. 5 (May 2009): 1107–11. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19517743

[42] Kohda, Chikara, Yoko Yanagawa, and Tadakatsu Shimamura. “Epigallocatechin Gallate Inhibits Intracellular Survival of Listeria Monocytogenes in Macrophages.” Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 365, no. 2 (January 11, 2008): 310–15. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2007.10.190. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17996193

[43] Ito, M., et al. “Inhibitory Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Penicillin G on Growth of Listeria Monocytogenes in Mouse Macrophages.”  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3103258

[44] Sadekuzzaman, M., S. Yang, M.f.r. Mizan, and S.d. Ha. “Current and Recent Advanced Strategies for Combating Biofilms.” Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety 14, no. 4 (July 1, 2015): 491–509. doi:10.1111/1541-4337.12144. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1541-4337.12144/pdf

[45] DC, Carolyn McMakin MA. Frequency Specific Microcurrent in Pain Management, 1e. 1 Pap/Dvdr edition. Edinburgh ; New York: Churchill Livingstone, 2011.

[46] Kose, Adem, and Yusuf Yakupogullari. “A Rapidly Fatal Sepsis Caused by Listeria Monocytogenes Type-4b in a Patient with Chronic Renal Failure.” Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology 8, no. 3 (March 2015): e19980. doi:10.5812/jjm.19980. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25969704

[47] Regan, Tim, Ken Nally, Ruaidhri Carmody, Aileen Houston, Fergus Shanahan, John Macsharry, and Elizabeth Brint. “Identification of TLR10 as a Key Mediator of the Inflammatory Response to Listeria Monocytogenes in Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Macrophages.” Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950) 191, no. 12 (December 15, 2013): 6084–92. doi:10.4049/jimmunol.1203245. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24198280

[48] Kernbauer, Elisabeth, Verena Maier, Isabella Rauch, Mathias Müller, and Thomas Decker. “Route of Infection Determines the Impact of Type I Interferons on Innate Immunity to Listeria Monocytogenes.” PloS One 8, no. 6 (2013): e65007. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065007. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23840314

[49] Vázquez-Boland, et al. “Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC88991/#

[50] Medina, Eduardo, Concepción Romero, Manuel Brenes, and Antonio De Castro. “Antimicrobial Activity of Olive Oil, Vinegar, and Various Beverages against Foodborne Pathogens.” Journal of Food Protection 70, no. 5 (May 2007): 1194–99. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17536679

[51] Castillo, Yussaira, Masato Tachibana, Yukiko Nakatsu, Kenta Watanabe, Takashi Shimizu, and Masahisa Watarai. “Combination of Zinc and All-Trans Retinoic Acid Promotes Protection against Listeria Monocytogenes Infection.” PloS One 10, no. 9 (2015): e0137463. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0137463. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26351852

[52] Hap, S., and N. A. Gutierrez. “Functional Properties of Some New Zealand Fruit Extracts towards Selected Probiotic and Pathogenic Bacteria.” Beneficial Microbes 3, no. 4 (December 1, 2012): 309–18. doi:10.3920/BM2012.0004. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968373

[53] Uymaz, Başar, Nefise Akkoç, and M. Akçelik. “Partial Characterization of Bacteriocins Produced by Two Lactobacilus Strains with Probiotic Properties.” Acta Biologica Hungarica 62, no. 1 (March 2011): 95–105. doi:10.1556/ABiol.61.2011.1.10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21388923

[54] Corr, Sinead C., Cormac G. M. Gahan, and Colin Hill. “Impact of Selected Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium Species on Listeria Monocytogenes Infection and the Mucosal Immune Response.” FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology 50, no. 3 (August 2007): 380–88. doi:10.1111/j.1574-695X.2007.00264.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17537177

[55] Pavia, Charles S., Cynthia M. Harris, and Marie Kavanagh. “Impaired Bactericidal Activity and Host Resistance to Listeria Monocytogenes and Borrelia Burgdorferi in Rats Administered an Acute Oral Regimen of Ethanol.” Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 9, no. 2 (March 2002): 282–86. doi:10.1128/CDLI.9.2.282-286.2002. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC119923/

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May 1 16

Why You Need These Four Essential Oils for Relieving Lyme Disease Insomnia and Brain Fog caused by Toxic Sinuses

by Greg

Ernie_Banks_gum

For people with Lyme disease who have brain fog and insomnia due to toxic sinus infections
by Greg Lee

 

I loved collecting baseball cards as a kid. When I opened a new pack of cards, I was always filled with excited thoughts of, “Will I get a Willie Mays or a Hank Aaron?” And sometimes I only got cards that I already had multiple copies of, bless you Bob Burda. After finding out which cards I received, I got to enjoy a big pink stick of bubble gum. I got in big trouble once, when I put the gum in my pocket and it ended up going through the washer. Many of the other clothes ended up being stuck to pink gooey gum.

 

How is melted bubble gum that sticks to your clothes similar to toxic sinus infections in people with Lyme?

 

Just like gooey bubble gum, toxic infections can get stuck in the sinuses
In multiple studies, people with chronic sinus irritation have tested positive for a variety of different infections including: Staphylococcus aureus[1], Staphylococcus epidermidis[2], Streptococcus intermedius[3], Chlamydia[4], Clostridia[5], Mycoplasma[6], Nocardia nova[7], Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes, and anaerobic organisms: Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, and Peptostreptococcus spp.[8] In immune compromised patients, multiple infections have detected including: Alternaria alternata[9], Aspergillus flavus[10], Mucormycetes[11], Fusarium[12], Cytomegalovirus[13], Bordetella petrii[14], Escherichia coli, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and basidiomycetous fungi (Schizophyllum commune)[15]. In rare cases, unusual infections that are mostly found in animals or soil have also been detected in sinus infections like: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius[16], and Paecilomyces variotii[17]. In other studies, dental infections have also been found to invade the sinuses[18]. Inflammatory markers can help to identify the types of infections in the sinus.

 

Inflammatory markers can give a clue to bacterial and fungal sinus infections
In sinus patients infected with Aspergillus and Alternaria, interleukin (IL)- 2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon-γ were elevated[19]. Another study on chronic bacterial sinus infection patients showed that inflammatory markers IL-4, IL-8, IL-13 and Myeloperoxidase (MPO) were higher in the upper airway compared to the lower airway[20]. Sinus infections can also produce chronic physical problems and difficult emotions.

 

Sinus infections can affect physical as well as emotional symptoms
Severe sinus infections produce toxins which triggers inflammation and can lead to complications like irritability, decreased attention, anxiety, insomnia, depression[21], meningitis, abscesses in the brain[22], paralysis, tremors, weakness, blindness[23], sepsis[24], cerebral aneurysm[25], stroke[26], and death[27]. Elevated inflammatory compounds: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-13 were correlated with sleep disturbance and depression and may be an indicator of the severity of a sinus infection[28]. Unfortunately, these infections have multiple defense mechanisms to help them persist in the sinuses.

 

Toxic sinus infections can survive longer by hiding under multiple defenses
Sinus infections can be characterized by local inflammation, mucus discharge, immunoglobulin deficiency[29], pus, cysts, or polyps[30]. Sinus polyps have been found to have high levels of fibrin[31], which can isolate infections from your immune system and medications. Biofilms[32] are a slime produced by many different infections to protect against antimicrobial drugs, the killer cells of the immune system, and against other pathogens. Biofilms can increase drug resistance by a factor of ten to a thousand fold[33]. Biofilms are believed to be a main cause of recurring sinus infections that persist despite surgeries, multiple rounds of antibiotics or antifungals[34]. One study identifies nasal cysts, polyps, and mucus as likely places where infections can survive despite intravenous antibiotic treatment[35]. Unfortunately, patients with Lyme disease have also been found to have drug-resistant Staph bacteria.

 

Drug resistant Staph bacterial have been detected in the sinuses of Lyme patients receiving antibiotic treatment
Dr. Ritchie Shoemaker has found Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Coagulase Negative Staph (MARCoNS) infections in the sinuses of his patients receiving antibiotic treatment[36]. His protocol uses a nasal spray consisting of antibiotics along with biofilm dissolving EDTA. Unfortunately, the majority of health care providers treating Lyme patients are not following Dr. Shoemaker’s protocol.

 

What else can help people with Lyme disease to fight drug-resistant, biofilm forming, multi-species sinus infections?

 

Here are four essential oils that are effective at inhibiting infections and inflammatory compounds found in sinus infections
Fortunately, there are essential oils that have been found to inhibit many of the infections and biofilms that infect the sinuses and have also been effective at relieving pain, sleep problems, and difficult emotions. Preparing the remedies in a micronized form called a liposome, which are microscopic particles of medicinal oils that are wrapped in a lipid, increases their penetration into tissues and their antimicrobial, antibiofilm properties[37]. Which is why liposomal remedies may be highly effective at helping patients with penetrating into and eliminating persistent sinus infections and accompanying symptoms.

 

Sinus Infection Essential Oil #1: Tea Tree
In one wound study, liposomal tea tree oil combined with silver ions was effective at inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans[38]. Tea Tree essential oil was also effective a reducing the size of wounds caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)[39]. Tea tree oil was also effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae[40], antibiotic resistant Candida spp.[41], Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its biofilm,[42] Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus[43], Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium chrysogenum[44], Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma fermentans[45], group A streptococcus[46], Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium culmorum, Pyrenophora graminea[47], Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum[48] in lab and animal studies.

 

In response to bacterial endotoxins, tea tree essential oil was effective at lowering inflammatory compounds IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10[49]. In another lab study, tea tree oil decreased IL-2 and increased anti-inflammatory compound IL-4[50]. Caution: some cases have been reported where tea tree oil caused allergic dermatitis when placed on the skin[51]. In five cases, high doses of this oil internally, 0.5-1.0 ml/kg, have produced central nervous system symptoms of loss of coordination, drowsiness, unconsciousness, diarrhea, and abdominal pain[52]. In addition to tea tree oil, cinnamon has excellent antimicrobial properties.

 

Sinus Infection Essential Oil #2: Cinnamon Bark 
In unpublished lab research, cinnamon essential oil was effective at cutting through the Lyme biofilm and killing the bacteria. This oil is also effective at inhibiting: multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli toxin production and biofilms[53], multi-drug resistant strains of Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus licheniformis[54], methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)[55], Candida albicans[56], quorum sensing communication in drug resistant Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa[57], Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes[58], Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis, Listeria monocytogenes[59], Penicillium commune, P. roqueforti, Aspergillus flavus and Endomyces fibuliger[60].

 

In other studies which combine this oil and antibiotics, cinnamon bark essential oil helped to reduce drug resistance in multiple bacterial strains when combined with a beta-lactam antibiotic[61] and had a synergistic effect with gentamicin against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter spp.[62]. Cinnamon oil has produced allergic dermatitis in some cases when placed on the skin. This oil may interfere with blood clotting. In one case, a boy drank 60 ml of cinnamon oil upon a dare and experienced symptoms of burning sensation in the mouth, chest and stomach, dizziness, double vision, nausea, vomiting and later collapse[63]. Another promising sinus antimicrobial remedy is thyme oil.

 

Sinus Infection Essential Oil #3: Thyme 
Thyme essential oil has been shown to inhibit Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)[64], Staphylococcus aureus biofilms[65], Antibiotic-Resistant Candida spp.[66], Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci[67], drug-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp. and Trichophyton rubrum[68],  Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni[69], Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas fluorescens[70], Zygosaccharomyces bailii[71], Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas genera[72], Aeromonas species[73], Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes[74].

 

In one mouse colitis experiment, thyme oil combined with oregano essential oil was effective at lowering IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNFalpha[75]. Caution: thyme oil (geraniol chemotype) should not be taken in people with obstructed bile flow[76]. In addition to thyme, lemongrass has antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties.

 

Sinus Infection Essential Oil #4: Lemongrass 
Lemongrass essential oil has inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilms[77], drug-resistant strains of Actinomyces naeslundii, Porphyromonas gingivalis[78], methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae[79], multi-drug resistant Candida albicans[80], multi-drug resistant strains of Streptococcus and Candida[81], and the Aeromonas hydrophyla biofilm[82].

 

Vaporized lemongrass oil combined with geranium oil inhibited MRSA, vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), Acinetobacter baumanii and Clostridium difficile[83]. Lemongrass oil followed by clove oil was highly effective against Candida albicans and its biofilms[84]. In one lab study, lemongrass oil inhibited the production of IL-1beta and IL-6[85]. Using multiple essential oils in combination can help with reducing chronic sinus infection symptoms.

 

Essential oils in combination can help to resolve chronic sinus infection symptoms in people with Lyme
Similar to getting sticky bubble gum off a bunch of clothes, essential oils can help people with Lyme to reduce sinus infection symptoms. Combining these oils can enhance their antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties. Patients that take these oils in a carrier oil under their tongue report reduced inflammation, improved sleep, and less brain fog. When encapsulated into a micronized particle called a liposome, these oils may be capable of even greater penetration into the sinus tissues when held in the mouth. In addition to inhibiting multiple harmful bacteria and fungi, these oils may also help with relieving uncomfortable emotions that are associated with elevated toxins and inflammation. Since some of these essential oils have cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

 

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday June 6th at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing from Lyme disease and co-infection symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to overcome insomnia and brain fog caused by a toxic sinus infection? Tell us about it.



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[56] Carvalhinho, Sara, Ana Margarida Costa, Ana Cláudia Coelho, Eugénio Martins, and Ana Sampaio. “Susceptibilities of Candida Albicans Mouth Isolates to Antifungal Agents, Essentials Oils and Mouth Rinses.” Mycopathologia 174, no. 1 (July 2012): 69–76. doi:10.1007/s11046-012-9520-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22246961
[57] Khan, M. S. A., M. Zahin, S. Hasan, F. M. Husain, and I. Ahmad. “Inhibition of Quorum Sensing Regulated Bacterial Functions by Plant Essential Oils with Special Reference to Clove Oil.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 49, no. 3 (September 2009): 354–60. doi:10.1111/j.1472-765X.2009.02666.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19627477
[58] Inouye, S., H. Yamaguchi, and T. Takizawa. “Screening of the Antibacterial Effects of a Variety of Essential Oils on Respiratory Tract Pathogens, Using a Modified Dilution Assay Method.” Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy: Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy 7, no. 4 (December 2001): 251–54. doi:10.1007/s101560100045. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11810593
[59] Smith-Palmer, A., J. Stewart, and L. Fyfe. “Antimicrobial Properties of Plant Essential Oils and Essences against Five Important Food-Borne Pathogens.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 26, no. 2 (February 1998): 118–22. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9569693
[60] Nielsen, P. V., and R. Rios. “Inhibition of Fungal Growth on Bread by Volatile Components from Spices and Herbs, and the Possible Application in Active Packaging, with Special Emphasis on Mustard Essential Oil.” International Journal of Food Microbiology 60, no. 2–3 (September 25, 2000): 219–29. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11016611
[61] Yap, Polly Soo Xi, Swee Hua Erin Lim, Cai Ping Hu, and Beow Chin Yiap. “Combination of Essential Oils and Antibiotics Reduce Antibiotic Resistance in Plasmid-Conferred Multidrug Resistant Bacteria.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 20, no. 8–9 (June 15, 2013): 710–13. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2013.02.013. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23537749
[62] Guerra, Felipe Queiroga Sarmento, Juliana Moura Mendes, Janiere Pereira de Sousa, Maria F. B. Morais-Braga, Bernadete Helena Cavalcante Santos, Henrique Douglas Melo Coutinho, and Edeltrudes de Oliveira Lima. “Increasing Antibiotic Activity against a Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Spp by Essential Oils of Citrus Limon and Cinnamomum Zeylanicum.” Natural Product Research 26, no. 23 (2012): 2235–38. doi:10.1080/14786419.2011.647019. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22191514
[63] Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. p. 890.
[64] Tohidpour, A., M. Sattari, R. Omidbaigi, A. Yadegar, and J. Nazemi. “Antibacterial Effect of Essential Oils from Two Medicinal Plants against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA).” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 17, no. 2 (February 2010): 142–45. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2009.05.007. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19576738
[65] Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel, Marta L. Cabo, and Juan J. Rodríguez-Herrera. “Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilms.” Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnología De Los Alimentos Internacional 21, no. 8 (December 2015): 559–70. doi:10.1177/1082013214553996. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25280938
[66] Rajkowska, Katarzyna, Alina Kunicka-Styczyńska, and Marta Maroszyńska. “Selected Essential Oils as Antifungal Agents Against Antibiotic-Resistant Candida Spp.: In Vitro Study on Clinical and Food-Borne Isolates.” Microbial Drug Resistance (Larchmont, N.Y.), April 19, 2016. doi:10.1089/mdr.2016.0001. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27092733
[67] Selim, Samy. “Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (vre) and Escherichia Coli o157:h7 in Feta Soft Cheese and Minced Beef Meat.” Brazilian Journal of Microbiology: [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology] 42, no. 1 (January 2011): 187–96. doi:10.1590/S1517-83822011000100023. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24031620
[68] Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad, Iqbal Ahmad, and Swaranjit Singh Cameotra. “Carum Copticum and Thymus Vulgaris Oils Inhibit Virulence in Trichophyton Rubrum and Aspergillus Spp.” Brazilian Journal of Microbiology: [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology] 45, no. 2 (2014): 523–31. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25242937
[69] Kovács, Judit K., Györgyi Horváth, Monika Kerényi, Béla Kocsis, Levente Emődy, and György Schneider. “A Modified Bioautographic Method for Antibacterial Component Screening against Anaerobic and Microaerophilic Bacteria.” Journal of Microbiological Methods 123 (April 2016): 13–17. doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2016.02.006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26853123
[70] Mith, Hasika, Rémi Duré, Véronique Delcenserie, Abdesselam Zhiri, Georges Daube, and Antoine Clinquart. “Antimicrobial Activities of Commercial Essential Oils and Their Components against Food-Borne Pathogens and Food Spoilage Bacteria.” Food Science & Nutrition 2, no. 4 (July 2014): 403–16. doi:10.1002/fsn3.116. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25473498
[71] Chang, Yuhua, Lynne McLandsborough, and David Julian McClements. “Physical Properties and Antimicrobial Efficacy of Thyme Oil Nanoemulsions: Influence of Ripening Inhibitors.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 60, no. 48 (December 5, 2012): 12056–63. doi:10.1021/jf304045a. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23140446
[72] Sienkiewicz, Monika, Monika Łysakowska, Julita Ciećwierz, Paweł Denys, and Edward Kowalczyk. “Antibacterial Activity of Thyme and Lavender Essential Oils.” Medicinal Chemistry (Shāriqah (United Arab Emirates)) 7, no. 6 (November 2011): 674–89. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22313307
[73] Uyttendaele, M., K. Neyts, H. Vanderswalmen, E. Notebaert, and J. Debevere. “Control of Aeromonas on Minimally Processed Vegetables by Decontamination with Lactic Acid, Chlorinated Water, or Thyme Essential Oil Solution.” International Journal of Food Microbiology 90, no. 3 (February 1, 2004): 263–71. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14751681
[74] Inouye, S., H. Yamaguchi, and T. Takizawa. “Screening of the Antibacterial Effects of a Variety of Essential Oils on Respiratory Tract Pathogens, Using a Modified Dilution Assay Method.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11810593
[75] Bukovská, Alexandra, Stefan Cikos, Stefan Juhás, Gabriela Il’ková, Pavol Rehák, and Juraj Koppel. “Effects of a Combination of Thyme and Oregano Essential Oils on TNBS-Induced Colitis in Mice.” Mediators of Inflammation 2007 (2007): 23296. doi:10.1155/2007/23296. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18288268
[76] Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. p. 1518.
[77] Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel, Marta L. Cabo, and Juan J. Rodríguez-Herrera. “Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilms.” Food Science and Technology International = Ciencia Y Tecnología De Los Alimentos Internacional 21, no. 8 (December 2015): 559–70. doi:10.1177/1082013214553996.
[78] Warad, Shivaraj B., Sahana S. Kolar, Veena Kalburgi, and Nagaraj B. Kalburgi. “Lemongrass Essential Oil Gel as a Local Drug Delivery Agent for the Treatment of Periodontitis.” Ancient Science of Life 32, no. 4 (April 2013): 205–11. doi:10.4103/0257-7941.131973. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24991068
[79] Warnke, Patrick H., Alexander J. S. Lott, Eugene Sherry, Joerg Wiltfang, and Rainer Podschun. “The Ongoing Battle against Multi-Resistant Strains: In-Vitro Inhibition of Hospital-Acquired MRSA, VRE, Pseudomonas, ESBL E. Coli and Klebsiella Species in the Presence of Plant-Derived Antiseptic Oils.” Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery: Official Publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 41, no. 4 (June 2013): 321–26. doi:10.1016/j.jcms.2012.10.012. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23199627
[80] Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad, Abida Malik, and Iqbal Ahmad. “Anti-Candidal Activity of Essential Oils Alone and in Combination with Amphotericin B or Fluconazole against Multi-Drug Resistant Isolates of Candida Albicans.” Medical Mycology 50, no. 1 (January 2012): 33–42. doi:10.3109/13693786.2011.582890. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21756200
[81] Warnke, Patrick H., Stephan T. Becker, Rainer Podschun, Sureshan Sivananthan, Ingo N. Springer, Paul A. J. Russo, Joerg Wiltfang, Helmut Fickenscher, and Eugene Sherry. “The Battle against Multi-Resistant Strains: Renaissance of Antimicrobial Essential Oils as a Promising Force to Fight Hospital-Acquired Infections.” Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery: Official Publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 37, no. 7 (October 2009): 392–97. doi:10.1016/j.jcms.2009.03.017. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19473851
[82] Millezi, Alessandra Farias, Maria das Graças Cardoso, Eduardo Alves, and Roberta Hilsdorf Piccoli. “Reduction of Aeromonas Hidrophyla Biofilm on Stainless Stell Surface by Essential Oils.” Brazilian Journal of Microbiology: [publication of the Brazilian Society for Microbiology] 44, no. 1 (2013): 73–80. doi:10.1590/S1517-83822013005000015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24159286
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[85] Sforcin, J. M., J. T. Amaral, A. Fernandes, J. P. B. Sousa, and J. K. Bastos. “Lemongrass Effects on IL-1beta and IL-6 Production by Macrophages.” Natural Product Research 23, no. 12 (2009): 1151–59. doi:10.1080/14786410902800681. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19662581

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Apr 25 16

Essential Oils for Healing Persistent Lyme Symptoms Online Six Week Training

by Greg

herbs_essential_oils
ONLINE Live Six Week Training: Essential Oils for Healing Persistent Lyme Symptoms for Medical Providers

Learn to Reduce Persistent Symptoms Faster in Your Lyme Disease Patients Through Essential Oils

– Do you have Lyme patients that continue to report recurring pain, fatigue and mental fog?

– Are you frustrated by the lack of patient improvement with
Lyme protocols?

– Learn about safe amounts of essential oils for internal use
to treat stubborn Lyme symptoms.

Sign up by April 28th and receive a BONUS cold laser and an essential oil remedy laser kit for Lyme and other infection symptoms worth $100.

Participants will get six one-hour live training sessions every Friday 3pm – 4pm EST from April 29th – June 3rd. All sessions are recorded and available for replay 24/7. Participants will also get bonus videos on using cold laser essential oils and making liposomal essential oil remedies for resolving persistent Lyme symptoms.

You can see two videos, one on specific essential oils for Lyme and co-infections and a second of an indepth case study on how oils helped heal neurological Lyme disease and co-infections here:

Training

Registration closes Thursday April 28th. Space is limited…
This training costs $900, which is 25% off the cost of the live event.

Questions about the training?
Please email me at TwoFrogsHealingCenter at gmail.com

– Greg

Apr 3 16

Can These Three Sweets Help You to Heal Lyme Disease?

by Greg

house_of_cards
For people with Lyme disease and co-infections who crave sweets and carbohydrates
by Greg Lee

Have you ever been glued to watching your favorite TV series? I’m often left with more questions at the end of an episode of House of Cards. Has Frank gone to far? Will this finally be his downfall? What will be the backlash of losing a hostage? My brain goes round and round with what might happen next season.

How is thinking about a captivating TV series similar to food cravings in people with Lyme disease?

Just like the drama in a popular TV series, people with Lyme disease can have unstoppable cravings for sweets
Many patients diagnosed with Lyme disease report craving carbohydrates, gluten-rich foods, sugar, and sweet fruits. They go back and forth with thoughts like, “Eat the ice cream, you deserve a treat!” “Don’t eat the ice cream, it’s bad for you.” Many of these people report an increase in their symptoms after giving in to the “EAT IT!” voice. Multiple studies correlate similar types of cravings with decreased levels of serotonin[1], melatonin[2], leptin[3], or dopamine[4]. Patients diagnosed with Lyme, co-infections, or mold can have lowered levels of serotonin[5], melatonin[6], or dopamine[7]. Unfortunately, these people can have difficulty overcoming their cravings.

People with Lyme disease often need more than dietary restrictions to overcome cravings
Most Lyme diet guideline tell people to avoid dairy, gluten, and refined sugars. These foods can increase inflammation which may increase symptoms of fatigue, brain fog, and pain. However, these restrictive diets often increase the intensity of cravings in patients which often leads to an inability to stick to the “recommended” foods. If the craving for carbs and sweets is related to an underlying deficiency, then increasing the deficient compound(s) could effectively reduce or eliminate the cravings.

What else beside dietary recommendations can help people with Lyme disease to stop cravings and fight infections?

These three sweets help reduce cravings and support the immune system to fight Lyme disease
Studies on obesity often recommend healthier replacements like stevia and xylitol in place of artificial sweeteners or refined sugars which people have become addicted to[8]. Fortunately, these sweeteners can reduce cravings and can help people to fight infections. These and other sweeteners can protect vital organs from toxic compounds and enhance the neurological functioning. Processing these sweeteners into a micronized particle called a liposome, enhances their delivery inside cells[9], into the nervous system[10], and into biofilms[11].

Lyme Healing Sweetener #1: Stevia
A big challenge in experiments is how to kill persistent “antibiotic resistant” forms of the Lyme bacteria. In one experiment, whole leaf extract of stevia was effective in eliminating persistent forms of Lyme as well as biofilms that they hide under[12]. In another study, it lowers blood glucose and serum triglyceride levels[13]. Other studies indicate that stevia has anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-diarrheal, diuretic, and immunomodulatory effects[14]. In addition to stevia, xylitol is a natural sweetener with additional healing properties for people with Lyme.

Lyme Healing Sweetener #2: Xylitol
Xylitol has shown in multiple animal and lab studies to inhibit different microbes including: H1N1[15], Streptococcus mutans and it’s biofiims[16], and Streptococcus pneumoniae[17]. It also has a bacteriostatic effect on Listeria Monocytogenes[18]. This sweetener also had a protective effect against Clostridium difficile in a mouse study[19]. Xylitol inhibits multiple oral biofilms in lab studies[20]. When combined with lactoferrin and silver, xylitol has enhanced anti-biofilm properties in wound healing studies[21]. A third sweetener, royal jelly can help with healing the damaging effects of Lyme.

Lyme Healing Sweetener #3: Royal Jelly
Royal jelly (RJ) is the food that is given to queen honey bees and larvae. Since the only way to develop queen bees is to continually feed them RJ, this sweetener enhances the genetic expression of larvae[22]. In one study, RJ had antifungal activity against Candida species[23]. In another study, RJ has been demonstrated to possess numerous functional properties such as antibacterial activity, anti-inflammatory activity, vasodilative and hypotensive activities, disinfectant action, antioxidant activity, antihypercholesterolemic activity, and antitumor activity[24].

In one study, RJ protected mice embryos from toxic oxymetholone[25]. In another mouse study, RJ enhanced bone regeneration[26]. In another rat study, RJ protected the colon against chemically induced colitis[27]. It also protected rats against chemotherapy kidney injury in another study[28].

Another study on rat pup brains showed how RJ increased gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and serotonin levels in response to toxic tartrazine[29]. Bees fed tyrosine, a compound in RJ, had increased levels of dopamine[30]. Rats with chemically induced brain injury, had greater memory recall and spatial learning when fed RJ[31]. In another experiment, RJ facilitated the differentiation of different neural cells and it’s compound HDEA facilitated neural growth[32]. RJ is most commonly mixed with honey. One caution, some people may have an allergic reaction to royal jelly. The sweeteners provide a sweet answer to food cravings in patients with Lyme and co-infections.

These sweeteners can help people with Lyme disease to stop food cravings by increasing deficient neurological compounds
Just like watching the “reveal all” episode that stops the obsessive thinking about the characters in a TV series, these sweeteners can be helpful at resolving food cravings by satisfying the underlying deficiencies in neurological compounds like dopamine and serotonin. These sweeteners can also help people to fight stealthy forms of infections, penetrate biofilms, and reduce the damaging effects of Lyme and co-infections. When encapsulated into a liposome, these sweeteners may have even greater penetration into the places where germs hide and provide deeper protection for the brain and other vital organs. Since some of these sweeteners have cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate herbal practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to our evening lecture Getting Rid of Lyme Disease in Frederick, Maryland on Monday April 4th at 6pm to learn more about sweeteners, herbs, and essential oils for protecting yourself from Lyme disease and co-infections.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where sweeteners helped you to fight and heal Lyme disease and co-infections? Tell us about it.


[1] Shabbir, Faisal, Akash Patel, Charles Mattison, Sumit Bose, Raathathulaksi Krishnamohan, Emily Sweeney, Sarina Sandhu, et al. “Effect of Diet on Serotonergic Neurotransmission in Depression.” Neurochemistry International 62, no. 3 (February 2013): 324–29. doi:10.1016/j.neuint.2012.12.014. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23306210
[2] Sandyk, R. “Treatment with Weak Electromagnetic Fields Attenuates Carbohydrate Craving in a Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.” The International Journal of Neuroscience 86, no. 1–2 (July 1996): 67–77. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8828061
[3] Licinio, J., A. B. Negrao, and M.-L. Wong. “Plasma Leptin Concentrations Are Highly Correlated to Emotional States throughout the Day.” Translational Psychiatry 4 (2014): e475. doi:10.1038/tp.2014.115. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25350298
[4] Blum, Kenneth, Panayotis K. Thanos, and Mark S. Gold. “Dopamine and Glucose, Obesity, and Reward Deficiency Syndrome.” Frontiers in Psychology 5 (2014): 919. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00919. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25278909
[5] Bransfield, Robert C., Jeffrey S. Wulfman, William T. Harvey, and Anju I. Usman. “The Association between Tick-Borne Infections, Lyme Borreliosis and Autism Spectrum Disorders.” Medical Hypotheses 70, no. 5 (2008): 967–74. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2007.09.006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17980971
[6] “The Biotoxin Pathway | Surviving Mold.” Accessed April 3, 2016. http://www.survivingmold.com/diagnosis/the-biotoxin-pathway.
[7] Sava, V., O. Reunova, A. Velasquez, R. Harbison, and J. Sánchez-Ramos. “Acute Neurotoxic Effects of the Fungal Metabolite Ochratoxin-A.” Neurotoxicology 27, no. 1 (January 2006): 82–92. doi:10.1016/j.neuro.2005.07.004. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16140385
[8] Bilton, Rod. “Averting Comfortable Lifestyle Crises.” Science Progress 96, no. Pt 4 (2013): 319–68. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24547668
[9] Pumerantz A, Muppidi K, Agnihotri S, Guerra C, Venketaraman V, Wang J, Betageri G. Preparation of liposomal vancomycin and intracellular killing of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2011 Feb;37(2):140-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2010.10.011. Epub 2010 Dec 3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21130608
[10] Alhariri M, Azghani A, Omri A. Liposomal antibiotics for the treatment of infectious diseases. Expert Opin Drug Deliv. 2013 Nov;10(11):1515-32. doi: 10.1517/17425247.2013.822860. Epub 2013 Jul 26. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23886421
[11] Jones, Malcolm N. “Use of Liposomes to Deliver Bactericides to Bacterial Biofilms.” Methods in Enzymology 391 (2005): 211–28. doi:10.1016/S0076-6879(05)91013-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15721384
[12] Theophilus, P. a. S., M. J. Victoria, K. M. Socarras, K. R. Filush, K. Gupta, D. F. Luecke, and E. Sapi. “Effectiveness of Stevia Rebaudiana Whole Leaf Extract Against the Various Morphological Forms of Borrelia Burgdorferi in Vitro.” European Journal of Microbiology & Immunology 5, no. 4 (December 2015): 268–80. doi:10.1556/1886.2015.00031. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26716015
[13] Ritu, Mathur, and Johri Nandini. “Nutritional Composition of Stevia Rebaudiana- A Sweet Herb and Its Hypoglycaemic and Hypolipidaemic Effect on Patients with Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, January 19, 2016. doi:10.1002/jsfa.7627. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26781312
[14] Ferrazzano, Gianmaria Fabrizio, Tiziana Cantile, Brunella Alcidi, Marco Coda, Aniello Ingenito, Armando Zarrelli, Giovanni Di Fabio, and Antonino Pollio. “Is Stevia Rebaudiana Bertoni a Non Cariogenic Sweetener? A Review.” Molecules (Basel, Switzerland) 21, no. 1 (2015). doi:10.3390/molecules21010038. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26712732
[15] Yin, Sun Young, Hyoung Jin Kim, and Hong-Jin Kim. “Protective Effect of Dietary Xylitol on Influenza A Virus Infection.” PloS One 9, no. 1 (2014): e84633. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084633. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24392148
[16] Marttinen, Aino M., Patricia Ruas-Madiedo, Claudio Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Markku A. Saari, Riikka A. Ihalin, and Eva M. Söderling. “Effects of Xylitol on Xylitol-Sensitive versus Xylitol-Resistant Streptococcus Mutans Strains in a Three-Species in Vitro Biofilm.” Current Microbiology 65, no. 3 (September 2012): 237–43. doi:10.1007/s00284-012-0151-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22645015
[17] Ruiz, Vicente, Violeta Rodríguez-Cerrato, Lorena Huelves, Gema Del Prado, Plínio Naves, Carmen Ponte, and Francisco Soriano. “Adherence of Streptococcus Pneumoniae to Polystyrene Plates and Epithelial Cells and the Antiadhesive Potential of Albumin and Xylitol.” Pediatric Research 69, no. 1 (January 2011): 23–27. doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181fed2b0. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20885335
[18] Morón de Salim, Alba Rosa, and Luis Guillermo Ramírez Mérida. “[Bacteriostatic effect and/or xylitol bactericide of crops on Listeria Monocytogenes].” Archivos Latinoamericanos De Nutrición 63, no. 2 (June 2013): 173–79. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24934074
[19] Naaber, P., R. H. Mikelsaar, S. Salminen, and M. Mikelsaar. “Bacterial Translocation, Intestinal Microflora and Morphological Changes of Intestinal Mucosa in Experimental Models of Clostridium Difficile Infection.” Journal of Medical Microbiology 47, no. 7 (July 1998): 591–98. doi:10.1099/00222615-47-7-591. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9839563
[20] Badet, Cécile, Aurélie Furiga, and Noélie Thébaud. “Effect of Xylitol on an in Vitro Model of Oral Biofilm.” Oral Health & Preventive Dentistry 6, no. 4 (2008): 337–41. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19178100
[21] Ammons, Mary Cloud B., Loren S. Ward, and Garth A. James. “Anti-Biofilm Efficacy of a Lactoferrin/xylitol Wound Hydrogel Used in Combination with Silver Wound Dressings.” International Wound Journal 8, no. 3 (June 2011): 268–73. doi:10.1111/j.1742-481X.2011.00781.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21457463
[22] “Royal Jelly.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, March 19, 2016. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Royal_jelly&oldid=710878679.
[23] Koç, Ayşe Nedret, Sibel Silici, Filiz Kasap, Hatice Tuna Hörmet-Oz, Hikmet Mavus-Buldu, and Bariş Derya Ercal. “Antifungal Activity of the Honeybee Products against Candida Spp. and Trichosporon Spp.” Journal of Medicinal Food 14, no. 1–2 (February 2011): 128–34. doi:10.1089/jmf.2009.0296. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21128826
[24] Viuda-Martos, M., Y. Ruiz-Navajas, J. Fernández-López, and J. A. Pérez-Alvarez. “Functional Properties of Honey, Propolis, and Royal Jelly.” Journal of Food Science 73, no. 9 (November 2008): R117–24. doi:10.1111/j.1750-3841.2008.00966.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19021816
[25] Zahmatkesh, Ensieh, Gholamreza Najafi, and Vahid Nejati. “Protective Effect of Royal Jelly on In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) in Male Mice Treated with Oxymetholone.” Cell Journal 17, no. 3 (2015): 569–75. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26464831
[26] Özan, Fatih, Bayram Çörekçi, Orçun Toptaş, Koray Halicioğlu, Celal Irgin, Fahri Yilmaz, and Yasin Hezenci. “Effect of Royal Jelly on New Bone Formation in Rapid Maxillary Expansion in Rats.” Medicina Oral, Patología Oral Y Cirugía Bucal 20, no. 6 (November 2015): e651–56. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26449428
[27] Karaca, Turan, Yesim Hulya Uz, Selim Demirtas, Ihsan Karaboga, and Guray Can. “Protective Effect of Royal Jelly in 2,4,6 Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.” Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences 18, no. 4 (April 2015): 370–79. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26019800
[28] Ibrahim, Abdelazim, Mabrouk A. Abd Eldaim, and Mohamed M. Abdel-Daim. “Nephroprotective Effect of Bee Honey and Royal Jelly against Subchronic Cisplatin Toxicity in Rats.” Cytotechnology, February 27, 2015. doi:10.1007/s10616-015-9860-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25720368
[29] Mohamed, Amany Abdel-Rahman, Azza A. A. Galal, and Yaser H. A. Elewa. “Comparative Protective Effects of Royal Jelly and Cod Liver Oil against Neurotoxic Impact of Tartrazine on Male Rat Pups Brain.” Acta Histochemica 117, no. 7 (September 2015): 649–58. doi:10.1016/j.acthis.2015.07.002. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26190785
[30] Matsuyama, Syuhei, Takashi Nagao, and Ken Sasaki. “Consumption of Tyrosine in Royal Jelly Increases Brain Levels of Dopamine and Tyramine and Promotes Transition from Normal to Reproductive Workers in Queenless Honey Bee Colonies.” General and Comparative Endocrinology 211 (January 15, 2015): 1–8. doi:10.1016/j.ygcen.2014.11.005. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25448251
[31] Zamani, Zohre, Parham Reisi, Hojjatallah Alaei, and Ali Asghar Pilehvarian. “Effect of Royal Jelly on Spatial Learning and Memory in Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease.” Advanced Biomedical Research 1 (July 6, 2012). doi:10.4103/2277-9175.98150. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3507025/
[32] Hattori, Noriko, Hiroshi Nomoto, Hidefumi Fukumitsu, Satoshi Mishima, and Shoei Furukawa. “Royal Jelly and Its Unique Fatty Acid, 10-Hydroxy-Trans-2-Decenoic Acid, Promote Neurogenesis by Neural Stem/progenitor Cells in Vitro.” Biomedical Research (Tokyo, Japan) 28, no. 5 (October 2007): 261–66. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18000339

 

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Mar 4 16

How These Four Essential Oils Protect the Liver in People with Lyme Disease and Co-infections

by Greg

pie_lady
For people with Lyme disease and co-infections who feel toxic and have abnormal liver function tests
by Greg Lee

One of my mom’s coworkers loved to bake. Our family always looked forward to going over to her house especially for dinner. Coming in the front door, I’d always smell the aroma of fresh baked dessert. In the kitchen, we’d sometimes see my mom’s friend in her apron and oven mitts pulling her baked goods out of the oven.

How is a hot pie similar to Lyme disease toxins that can disrupt the liver?

Just like a hot pie that could burn you if you touched it, Lyme disease toxins can harm the healthy functioning of the liver
In multiple studies, people infected with Lyme disease have been diagnosed with liver problems including hepatitis,[1] liver enlargement[2], febrile jaundice, liver cytolytic and cholestatic abnormalities[3], [4], abnormal liver function assays[5], and elevated liver enzymes[6]. Since a primary role of the liver is detoxification, how well it can detoxify has a direct impact on how sick or well a person feels from the toxins produced by Lyme disease. In alcoholic patients that have similar toxic liver issues, elevated levels of endotoxins and inflammatory compounds are common. These toxins can increase liver inflammation, fatty liver, scarring, and organ damage[7]. Not only toxins from Lyme, but also genetics can have a dramatic impact on liver detoxification.

Genetics as well as Lyme can influence how well the liver can deal with toxins and medications
In one study, people with non-viral liver inflammation and chronic liver failure were more likely to have genetic mutations called MTHFR C677T, and PAI-1 4G-4G[8]. In another study, people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease had greater numbers of MTHFR C677T and MTHFR 1298A/C mutations[9]. In a third study, people with the MTHFR C677T and A1298C were at higher risk of developing liver carcinoma in a study in China[10]. Tuberculosis patients with genetic mutations NAT2, GST and CYP2E1 have greater incidence of antibiotic induced liver toxicity in one study[11]. GST influences the production of glutathione which is an important detoxification compound in the liver and the whole body. A significant number of Lyme patients have genetic mutations which interfere with how well they detoxify and protect their liver. Liver function can also be influenced by antibiotic treatment for Lyme.

Antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease can have positive or negative effect on the liver
In one study, most patients with early Lyme disease that received antibiotics had liver function tests return to normal after three weeks of treatment[12]. In other studies, patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease experienced negative side effects ranging from: mild liver function derangement[13] and hepatitis and elevated liver enzymes[14]. Lyme patients that are taking antibiotics that also test positive for abnormal liver function can be taken off their medications to protect their liver. Lyme disease stimulates the production of inflammatory compounds which can affect liver functioning.

Lyme disease can elevate inflammatory compounds that can impact the liver and other organs
Patients with Lyme disease have been found to have many elevated pro-inflammatory compounds including: Interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, Tumor Necrosis Factor – alpha  (TNF-α)[15], and C-Reactive Protein[16]. IL-6 is actually elevated in liver regeneration[17]. However, IL-6 is also a pathogenic factor in various autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases[18]. Elevated levels of Il-8 have been found in patients with neurologic Lyme disease. Elevated C-reactive protein have been associated with a decline in mental function and frontal lobe damage[19]. These inflammatory compounds can also dramatically affect the emotions of people with Lyme.

Liver dysfunction can also affect painful emotions
Painful emotions are directly attributed to dysfunction in the liver in Chinese medicine[20]. There is a strong correlation between elevated liver enzymes and higher levels of C-Reactive Protein[21]. In one study, depressed men had higher levels of inflammatory compounds IL-6 and C-Reactive Protein [22]. Another animal study correlates psycho-social stress with the production of inflammatory compounds Tumor Necrosis Factor – alpha (TNF-α) and IL-6 and increased liver inflammation[23]. Depression and anxiety were the two most common emotions in a study on alcoholic patients with liver scarring[24].

What else can help patients with Lyme or co-infection toxins that feel toxic and have abnormal liver function tests?

Here are four essential oils that are effective at protecting the liver and reducing inflammation
Fortunately, there are essential oils that protect the liver and reduce toxicity and inflammation in animal studies. Preparing the oils in a micronized form called a liposome, which are microscopic particles of medicinal oils that are wrapped in a sunflower lecithin compound called phosphatidylcholine may increase their effectiveness at protecting the liver when combined with a compound found in licorice[25]. A liposomal herbal extract was more effective at delivering medicine into the liver compared to its non-liposomal equivalent[26]. Which is why liposomal essential oils maybe more effective at helping patients with protecting the liver and detoxification.

Liver Protection Essential Oil #1: Black Cumin Seed Essential Oil
Black cumin seed essential oil demonstrated antioxidant properties which had a beneficial effect on liver enzymes in a rat study[27]. In another study, this oil reduced TNF-α induced arthritis in another rat study[28]. Black cumin seed oil also has demonstrated anti-inflammatory, analgesic, fever reducing, antimicrobial and anti-tumor activity. It also decreases blood pressure and increases respiration. This oil has been shown not to induce significant adverse effects on liver or kidney functions[29]. Thymoquinone (TQ), a major active compound in black cumin seed oil, lowered inflammatory compounds IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and increased glutathione (GSH) in multiple rat studies[30]. In another rat study, this oil increased tryptophan levels in the brain and decreased anxiety[31] and depression[32].  In addition to black cumin seed oil, ginger oil also protects the liver.

Liver Protection Essential Oil #2: Ginger Essential Oil
Ginger essential oil demonstrated liver protective properties in a mouse study.[33] In another mouse study, this oil significantly increased glutathione and glutathione reductase enzymes in blood and glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase and antioxidant enzymes in the liver. Ginger oil also significantly reduced acute inflammation[34]. Ginger oil combined with magnolia extracts has an antidepressant effect in a rat study[35]. This oil has been classified as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)[36]. Besides ginger, turmeric oil can help reduce inflammation from Lyme disease and co-infections.

Liver Protection Essential Oil #3: Turmeric Essential Oil
Turmeric essential oil reduced hepatic cholesterol and oxidative stress, and improved liver function in one hamster study[37]. In another rat study, turmeric oil reduced endothelial cell induced inflammation[38]. Endothelial cell inflammation is a recurring problem in patients with Babesia[39], Bartonella, Ehrlichia, Anaplasmosis[40], and Lyme arthritis that does not improve with antibiotic treatment[41]. In a mouse study, turmeric oil increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione reductase enzyme levels in blood and glutathione-S-transferase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in the liver. This oil also demonstrated significant antioxidant activity and reduced acute and chronic inflammation[42]. In addition to turmeric, rosemary oil also protects the liver.

Liver Protection Essential Oil #4: Rosemary Essential Oil
Rosemary essential oil demonstrated liver protecting properties by reversing  chemical injury to antioxidant enzymes catalase, peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in a rat study[43]. This oil also demonstrated liver protecting properties in a separate mouse study[44]. In another lab study, rosemary oil inhibited the proliferation of human liver carcinoma cells[45]. In another mouse study, rosemary oil reduced the inflammatory compound IL-6[46]. In a human study, this oil lowered salivary cortisol levels[47].

Given that some varieties of rosemary essential oil have high camphor content which is neurotoxic, rosemary oil (β-myrcene CT) chemotype is recommended because it contains the lowest amount (2.1–4.4%) of this component[48]. Multiple oils can provide liver protection and can help reduce toxicity and inflammation in patients with Lyme disease and co-infections.

Essential oils that protect the liver can help reduce inflammation in people with Lyme disease
Just like using an insulated oven mitt to get a hot pie out of the oven, anti-toxin and anti-inflammatory essential oils can help people with Lyme and co-infections to protect their liver. These oils can be helpful especially when liver function is damaged by toxins or antibiotics. When encapsulated into a sunflower lecithin liposome and combined with a licorice extract, these oils may be capable of even greater penetration into and protection for the liver. In addition to reducing toxicity, these oils may also help with relieving painful emotions that are associated with liver dysfunction. Since some of these essential oils have cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to our evening lecture:  Getting Rid of Lyme Disease in Frederick, Maryland on Monday March 7th at 6pm to learn more about essential oils for protecting yourself from Lyme disease and co-infections.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies, or treatments helped to protect your liver, reduce toxins, and lift depression? Tell us about it.

 

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[39] Aikawa, Masamichi, Emsri Pongponratn, Tatsuya Tegoshi, Kei-Ichiro Nakamura, Tsuyoshi Nagatake, Alan Cochrane, Luiz S. Ozaki, et al. “A Study on the Pathogenesis of Human Cerebral Malaria and Cerebral Babesiosis.” Memórias Do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 87 (1992): 297–301. doi:10.1590/S0074-02761992000700051. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1343706

[40] Buhner, Stephen Harrod. Natural Treatments for Lyme Coinfections: Anaplasma, Babesia, and Ehrlichia. Inner Traditions / Bear & Co, 2015.

[41] Ghosh, Srimoyee, Robert Seward, Catherine E. Costello, B. David Stollar, and Brigitte T. Huber. “Autoantibodies from Synovial Lesions in Chronic, Antibiotic Treatment-Resistant Lyme Arthritis Bind Cytokeratin-10.” Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950) 177, no. 4 (August 15, 2006): 2486–94. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16888010

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[45] Vicente, Gonzalo, Susana Molina, Margarita González-Vallinas, Mónica R. García-Risco, Tiziana Fornari, Guillermo Reglero, and Ana Ramírez de Molina. “Supercritical Rosemary Extracts, Their Antioxidant Activity and Effect on Hepatic Tumor Progression.” The Journal of Supercritical Fluids, Special Issue – 10th International Symposium on Supercritical FluidsSpecial Issue – 10th International Symposium on Supercritical Fluids, 79 (July 2013): 101–8. doi:10.1016/j.supflu.2012.07.006. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0896844612002458

[46] Juhás, Štefan, Alexandra Bukovská, Štefan Čikoš, Soňa Czikková, Dušan Fabian, and Juraj Koppel. “Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Rosmarinus Officinalis Essential Oil in Mice.” Acta Veterinaria Brno 78, no. 1 (2009): 121–27. doi:10.2754/avb200978010121. http://actavet.vfu.cz/media/pdf/avb_2009078010121.pdf

[47] Atsumi, Toshiko, and Keiichi Tonosaki. “Smelling Lavender and Rosemary Increases Free Radical Scavenging Activity and Decreases Cortisol Level in Saliva.” Psychiatry Research 150, no. 1 (February 28, 2007): 89–96. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2005.12.012. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17291597

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Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

Feb 1 16

Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Evening Talk Mon Feb 1st 6-9pm in Frederick

by Greg

Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Evening Talk
in Frederick, Maryland

Monday February 1st from 6pm – 9pm
10 N. Jefferson Street, Suite 203,
Frederick, MD 21701

People with Lyme disease can still be sick with pain, fatigue,
or neurological problems despite months or years of treatment.

Why are some Lyme patients sick despite many years of antibiotics?

What else besides medications will help them to clear their infections?

Which detoxification methods are helping people to heal their Lyme disease?

Monday February 1st, 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Location: Two Frogs Healing Center, 10 N. Jefferson Street, Suite 203, Frederick, MD
Evening lecture tuition: $20
Click here to register: http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Deer, mice, birds, and squirrels carry infected ticks into suburban
neighborhoods

These ticks that can carry Lyme and over 60 other tick infections that can make
diagnosis and treatment much more lengthy and complicated. Lyme disease has
also been reported in chiggers, mosquitoes, and biting flies.

Lyme bacteria can be very hard to eliminate from your system
Ticks can infect people without leaving a rash. The Lyme bacteria can hide in
their joints and in their nervous system. They produce lots of toxins that quickly
erase the benefits of treatment.

The Lyme bacteria can lay dormant under a protective slime called a biofilm
Alternative medicines cut through slime, remove toxins and kill bacteria
Ayurvedic and Chinese herbs have been scientifically proven to cut through
bacteria biofilms. When patients take anti-toxin and anti-Lyme herbs, they
report recovering 80% – 100% off their energy, getting their mental clarity
back, and being pain-free for the first time in years.

AJ received an electrodermal scan which showed elevated levels of Epstein-Barr
and Cytomegalovirus, mycoplasma, and a Lyme disease infection. She also tested
positive for the MTHFR and BHMT genetic mutations that affect detoxification
through the methylation cycle.

She was treated with Frequency Specific Microcurrent, nascent iodine, and
liposomal herbs and essential oils for gut repair, Lyme disease, mycoplasma,
and viruses. She also received cupping and bloodletting to pull out toxins and
inflammation out of her nervous system. After a few treatments, her gut was
much less bloated, energy levels were 90% better, and joint pains were almost
entirely gone. She felt so much better that she planned a vacation for the first
time in three years. How is this possible?

Learn how the latest natural treatments can help to relieve persistent Lyme
disease symptoms of dizziness, gut problems, and fatigue. Also learn how
remedies help with treating co-infections, restoring energy, and relieving
brain inflammation.

To reserve your space please click on
http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme
or for more information call us at 301.228.3764 .

Dec 30 15

Internal Use of Essential Oils for Treating Stubborn Lyme Symptoms Training Thur Dec 31 3-4pm

by Greg

Learn to Reduce Recurring Symptoms Faster in Your Lyme Disease Patients Through Essential Oils

-Do you have Lyme patients that continue to report recurring
pain, fatigue and mental fog?

– Are you frustrated by the lack of patient improvement with
Lyme protocols?

– Learn about safe amounts of essential oils for internal use
to treat stubborn Lyme symptoms.

– Receive a free subscription to our GoodbyeLyme Newsletter
(we don’t share your info with anyone).

Get two chances on the webinar to win a cold
laser and a test kit!
Participants that join early will have a chance to win
a cold laser and an essential oil remedy test kit for Lyme
and other infections worth $100. You need to be on the
video link to qualify for the bonus. You can listen over
the phone, however you will not be qualified to receive
the bonuses (phone listeners do not have an option to
use the chat function).

Towards the end of the webinar, there will be another
chance to win a second laser and test kit. This laser
and test kit are the actual equipment that I use in the
treatment room with patients. If you are a winner, then
please private message us in the chat with your email or
phone number so we can contact you to get your mailing
address.

Get awesome information in one training for only ($22) 1x time Live Online Training
(A link to the training will be sent to the email that you submit via Paypal)

Register at this link:
http://unbouncepages.com/internal-essential-oils-for-lyme-symptoms/

You will receive in your inbox a unique link to join the
training. This link is unique to your email that you used
to register so please don’t share it or you won’t be able
to get on. Space is limited…

See you on the training!

– Greg

Greg Lee is a world expert on using Chinese herbs, essential oils and natural treatments for healing incredibly persistent Lyme disease. He has developed special methods for customizing and delivering essential oils to help patients heal their stubborn, chronic infections.

Dec 22 15

Interested in safe use of essential oils? Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Ed now $13-a $67 holiday savings (TIME SENSITIVE)

by Greg

Hey it’s Greg here,

If you are at all interested in learning
how to use essential oils, then I highly
recommend getting the book:

Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Ed.

http://digitalsoftocean.com/product/essential-oil-safety-a-guide-for-health-care-professionals-2e/

The hardcover is around $80, for the next
hour you can get a digital copy for $13.
I’m not making any commission on the sale,

Robert Tisserand’s work is extremely
valuable to helping me formulate
essential oils safely for my patients.
He provides topical and internal dosing
guidelines based on human and animal
studies.

I just downloaded my copy and I’m able to
search through and find what I want to know
about individual oils more quickly.

Don’t delay because there is only a short
amount of time left to get this offer.

Peace and healing,

Greg

P.S. Interested in learning how to stop recurring
Lyme symptoms using essential oils?
http://goodbyelyme.com/training