Why Strep Can be a Big Problem and Four Ways to Help Clean it Out

For people that have chronic joint pain, headaches, and inflammation that are not improving with Lyme disease treatment
by Greg Lee

mushroom

On foraging trips with the local mushroom society, my mom would cringe as inexperienced newcomers would pick poisonous mushrooms that looked similar to edible ones. Fortunately on every trip, there were several mushroom experts that could teach the group how to distinguish between poisonous look-a-likes and their edible cousins. The embarrassed newcomers were extremely grateful learn the difference and avoid a trip to the emergency room for mushroom poisoning.

How is mistaking a poisonous mushroom for an edible look-a-like similar to a misdiagnosed Lyme disease infection?

Just like picking a poisonous mushroom that looks edible, there are infections that can produce symptoms very similar to a Lyme disease infection
Claire suffered with chronic migraines, back pain, joint inflammation, disturbed sleep, and high blood pressure. Her tests for all sorts of autoimmune disorders, infections, heart disease came up negative. She was prescribed high blood pressure and anti-inflammatory medicines for her symptoms. She was suspected of having Lyme disease due to living in an endemic area and her chronic recurring symptoms. Her Lyme Western Blot tests all came back negative.

Various medications, supplements and treatments gave her some relief for her migraines and joint symptoms
Chiropractic adjustments, acupuncture, and anti-inflammatory supplements brought some relief, however symptoms would quickly return a few days later. After many months, her doctor gave her the diagnosis of fibromyalgia and a prescription for Cymbalta. This medication helped a little with the pain. For several years, Claire just lived with the side effects of the medication: nausea, fatigue, and sweats. Fortunately, she decided to get a new type of scan that checks for electrical frequencies of different infections.

Electro-dermal scanning technology can help to find the hidden causes of persistent symptoms
Claire received an electro-dermal scan that checked different systems of her body for illness, infections, and possible remedies. The scan identified an elevated frequency corresponding to a Streptococcus B hemolytic infection hiding in her sinus and in her intestines. According to the CDC website1, “[One of] the most common problems caused by Group B strep in adults are: Bone and joint infections.” Neurological strep infections have been associated with Parkinson’s disease2. Could Strep B be contributing to Claire’s joint problems also?

Here are four strategies for clearing a Streptococcus B infection that helped Claire feel better quickly
Given that the strep B infection could be systemic, Claire’s treatment and medicines were focused on clearing out her infection from her sinuses, intestines, and joints. Strep can move through the blood, so anti-strep treatments for clearing infection from her entire body were also used. Given her concerns about drug resistant infections, she decided to try a natural approach first before taking more antibiotics. A combination of treatment and anti-strep natural medicines brought relief quickly.

Strategy #1: Use sublingual essential oils to target sinus infections
Claire received a mixture of essential oils that have inhibited strep B and strep species in lab studies: cinnamon, lemongrass3, clove4, eucalyptus, and tea tree5. Every night, she held a few drops under her tongue to allow the oils to diffuse into her sinus cavities. Within a few days her headaches subsided. Claire also drank herbs processed into a liposomal mixture to target infections in her body.

Strategy #2: Take liposomal herbs to focus on system infections
Liposomal herbs are processed into a very small particle size and have a lecithin (lipid) covering which increases absorption. Claire took a customized liposomal mixture of herbs that inhibit or have anti-strep properties in different experiments: forsythia fruit6, artemisia argyii7, angelica root8, asparagus root9, buplerum10, scutellaria11, coptidis12, sophora13, tree peony14, honeysuckle flower15, and curcuma zedoraria16. Liposomal herbal formulas have been highly effective at relieving joint symptoms compared to herbs in alcohol tinctures, decoctions, or powdered herbs for patients infected with Lyme disease17. Frequency Specific Microcurrent treatments also help to target localized and systemic strep infections.

Strategy #3: Apply Frequency Specific Microcurrent to kill strep locally and systemically
Frequency Specific Microcurrent treatments uses a pair of low level electrical currents, labelled A and B, in the millionths of an amp range. The “A” current pair was used for killing strep B or eliminating strep toxins. The “B” current pair was used to target the entire body, sinuses, small intestine, large intestine, low back, and lower extremity joints18. Claire felt much more relaxed and energized after receiving microcurrent frequencies for killing and detoxing strep systemically and locally. Changing her diet also helped.

Strategy #4: Eat foods that help kill strep
There are foods that have inhibit strep in lab experiments. Claire added asparagus19, scallion20, and drank chrysanthemum flower21 tea to her diet to fight strep. She felt a difference in her symptoms soon after getting treatments, taking her medicines, and changing her diet.

Claire felt a big difference in a few days
Three days after her first treatment, she felt a huge decrease in her joint pain.  She was excited to feel how treatment, the essential oils and herbs were working. The diet seemed to help also. A few weeks into her treatment, she increased her dose of essential oils and then felt worse from killing off too many germs too quickly. After backing her dose down of herbs and oils, she found that she was less symptomatic and more functional. A combination of four strategies can help you fight a systemic strep infection.

These four strategies can help to fight off a systemic strep infection
Just like being able to identify edible mushrooms versus poisonous ones, electro-dermal testing helps to identify which infections may be the biggest troublemakers. Antimicrobial strategies can then be selected to target the most troublesome infections. In Claire’s example, sub-lingual and oral essential oils, herbs, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, and dietary changes helped her to reduce the symptoms caused by a systemic strep infection. Since some of these herbs and essential oils have cautions on their use, work with an herbalist knowledgeable in antimicrobial medicines to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where electrodermal scanning helped you identify the underlying infections? Which herbs, essential oils, or treatments helped you to reduce recurring migraines, inflammation, or joint pains? Tell us about it.

1.        Group B Strep Infection in Adults. http://www.cdc.gov/groupbstrep/about/adults.html
2.        Gordon, Gary. LYME Could Be Called L. I. M. E. S. (Lowered Immune Metabolic Encephalo-arthropathy Syndrome). Integrative Lyme Solutions: The Evidence Basis Conference. Dallas, Texas. June 21, 2013.

3.        Warnke PH, Becker ST, Podschun R, Sivananthan S, Springer IN, Russo PA, Wiltfang J, Fickenscher H, Sherry E. The battle against multi-resistant strains: Renaissance of antimicrobial essential oils as a promising force to fight hospital-acquired infections. J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2009 Oct;37(7):392-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jcms.2009.03.017. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19473851
4.        Fabio A, Cermelli C, Fabio G, Nicoletti P, Quaglio P. Screening of the antibacterial effects of a variety of essential oils on microorganisms responsible for respiratory infections. Phytother Res. 2007 Apr;21(4):374-7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17326042
5.        Takarada K, Kimizuka R, Takahashi N, Honma K, Okuda K, Kato T. A comparison of the antibacterial efficacies of essential oils against oral pathogens. Oral Microbiol Immunol. 2004 Feb;19(1):61-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14678476

6.        Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 175.
7.        Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 601.
8.        Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 921.
9.        Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 947.
10.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 85.
11.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 139.
12.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 143.
13.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 152.
14.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 161.
15.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 172.
16.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 667.
17.      Lee, Greg. Beyond Wack-A-Mole Lyme Treatment: What Has Helped People to Heal Lyme MCIDs Concurrent with or Post Drug Therapy. Integrative Lyme Solutions: The Evidence Basis Conference, Dallas, Texas, June 22, 2013.
18.      Frequency Specific Microcurrent Advanced Summary Protocols. http://www.frequencyspecific.com/faq.php#protocol
19.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 947.
20.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 59.
21.      Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 76.

Image courtesy of Paffka from Wikimedia Commons

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