Can’t Warm Up? Four Essential Oils for Heating Up the Immune System to Overcome Lyme and Co-infection Pains

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For people diagnosed with Lyme and co-infections that are always cold and have worse pain in winter months
by Greg Lee

One bitterly cold morning, I turned on the shower and nothing happened. No water, nada, not a drop. I thought, “Oh crap, a pipe must have frozen.” If the pipe doesn’t thaw, ice could make the pipe burst and that would be a huge mess. I opened up the access panel and put a heater on the pipes to help them thaw out.

How is a frozen water pipe similar to bone chilling coldness in people with Lyme disease and co-infections?

Similar to a frozen water pipe, Lyme and tick co-infections can freeze up your immune system
One way your immune system fights off infections is by heating up and creating a fever. One theory why Lyme disease and co-infections can persist is that they create toxins which stop the body from heating up and creating fevers. These toxins affect the hypothalamus which is the part of your brain which regulates your temperature. Unfortunately, toxins in the blood can be absorbed directly into the hypothalamus which prevents it from heating up the body1. As a result, some Lyme and co-infection patients that are always cold can have body temperatures as low as 95 degrees Farenheit. These toxins disrupt how these people can make fevers to kill off infections. A lower body temperature can also make symptoms worse especially in colder months.

Lyme and co-infection patients often report increased pain, fatigue, and insomnia in the winter
In Chinese medicine, winter winds, rain / dampness, and cold are able to “invade” into the body and increase symptoms like migratory pain, fatigue, and internal coldness2. Many of my Lyme and co-infection patients report greater pain, fatigue, and depression especially in the winter months. Their increased symptoms may disrupt sleep, increase mental fog, and decrease the motivation and energy to make and eat a healthy diet. These patients report that they take lots of hot baths, drink hot liquids, and bundle up with multiple layers to try and reduce their symptoms in the winter.

What else may help people with Lyme and co-infections to dispel aches, fatigue, and depression of winter?

Fortunately, there are four essential oils that warm the body from the inside out and reduce painful inflammatory compounds
According to Chinese medicine, there are several essential oils that can help to warm up the body, lower pain, reduce fatigue, and inflammation. Several of these oils also increase the levels of glutathione and other antioxidant enzymes in animal studies. Glutathione inhibited the development of complex regional pain symptoms in a rat study3. These oils have been classified by the Food and Drug Administration as “Generally Recognized as Safe” (GRAS) and some of these essential oils have been used safely for years in our food supply4. Formulating these essential oils into microparticles called liposomes may help them penetrate deeper inside cells and into the brain5 to warm up and relieve cold, painful areas.

Warming & Pain Reducing Essential Oil #1: Fennel
Fennel essential oil helps to warm the body, replenish Q or energy, and helps to moisten dryness according to Chinese medicine6. In infant studies, fennel oil was helpful in reducing colic7. In rat studies, fennel oil reduced painful uterine contractions8 and colitis9. In another rat study, this oil protected the liver and kidneys against toxic injury10. Fennel oil also protected the liver against toxic injury in a mouse study11.

In another mouse study, fennel essential oil was effective at increasing antioxidant enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in the liver12. Fennel oil reduced anxiety in another mouse study13. This oil is classified as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA14.

Fennel oil is contraindicated in pregnancy, breastfeeding, endometriosis, estrogen-dependent cancers, children under five years of age. This oil is cautioned in patients taking diabetes medications and anticoagulant medications. It is also cautioned with major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, other bleeding disorders15. In addition to fennel, turmeric essential oil may also help to increase body temperature.

Warming & Pain Reducing Essential Oil #2: Turmeric
Turmeric essential oil has warming properties according to Chinese medicine16. In animal experiments, turmeric essential oil reduced painful rheumatoid arthritic joint symptoms17. In a mouse experiment, this oil increased superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione reductase enzyme levels in blood and glutathione-S-transferase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in liver18. This oil has demonstrated multiple healing properties including: reducing brain inflammation, protecting the liver against toxins, reducing the risk of stroke, protecting against convulsions, and reducing anxiety in several animal and human studies19.  This oil is classified as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA20. Turmeric oil is cautioned with diabetes medications21. Dill essential oil may also help provide warm greater internal heat according to Chinese medicine.

Warming & Pain Reducing Essential Oil #3: Dill seed
Dill seed essential oil has warming properties according to Chinese medicine22. In a rat study, dill seed oil reduced toxic swelling and discomfort23. In another rat study, dill oil exhibited cardio-protective properties24. This oil is classified as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA25. Dill oil is contraindicated in pregnancy26. Dill essential oil is cautioned in patients taking diabetes medications27.

Rosemary essential oil may also increase warmth and decrease pain in low body temperature Lyme and co-infection patients.

Warming & Pain Reducing Essential Oil #4: Rosemary
Rosemary essential oil has warming properties according to Chinese medicine28. Rosemary oil has been used to relieve renal colic pain and reduced the pain reaction in a mouse study29. In a human study, rosemary essential oil combined with other oils reduced pain and depression in arthritis patients30. In another animal study, this oil increased local blood circulation and alleviated pain31. In a rat study, rosemary oil exhibited liver protecting properties and increased levels of antioxidant enzymes catalase, peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase32. This oil is classified as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA33. Rosemary Camphor chemotype or α-Pinene chemotype are the best for internal use. Do not apply rosemary 1,8-cineole chemotype to or near the face of infants or children34. These essential oils alone or in combination may help to reduce symptoms of coldness and pain caused by Lyme disease and co-infection toxins that are lowering body temperature.

Essential oils may help to increase internal warmth and the immune system’s ability to create fevers to kill Lyme and co-infections
Similar to heating up a frozen pipe to get a hot water flowing again, essential oils that increase internal warmth and lower pain may help the immune system to heat up and kill off Lyme and co-infections. Formulating these essential oils into microparticle liposomes may enhance their ability to penetrate into, warm up, and reduce pain in cells, the brain, and other organs where infections are hiding. Since these essential oils have cautions and contraindications on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where treatment or remedies helped you warm up and relieve pains from Lyme disease or co-infections? Tell us about it.

>> Next step: Join us for our live online lecture: Stopping Lyme Disease Pain by 75% or More with Liposomes in Frederick, Maryland on Wednesday December 5th at 6pm EST to learn more about these new breakthrough remedies for multiple infections, natural treatments for reducing neurological problems, inflammation, and pain caused by Lyme disease, Candida, co-infections, parasites, and mold. https://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme


1 Klinghardt, D. Klinghardt Lyme Solutions 2017. Bastyr University. May 5-7, 2017

2 Dashtdar, Mehrab, Mohammad Reza Dashtdar, Babak Dashtdar, Karima Kardi, and Mohammad khabaz Shirazi. “The Concept of Wind in Traditional Chinese Medicine.” Journal of Pharmacopuncture 19, no. 4 (December 2016): 293–302. https://doi.org/10.3831/KPI.2016.19.030.

3 Yeo, Jinseok, Hoon Jung, and Hyerim Lee. “Effects of Glutathione on Mechanical Allodynia and Central Sensitization in Chronic Postischemic Pain Rats.” Pain Research & Management 2017 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7394626.

4 Hyldgaard, Morten, Tina Mygind, and Rikke Louise Meyer. “Essential Oils in Food Preservation: Mode of Action, Synergies, and Interactions with Food Matrix Components.” Frontiers in Microbiology 3 (January 25, 2012). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2012.00012.

5 Sherry, Mirna, Catherine Charcosset, Hatem Fessi, and Hélène Greige-Gerges. “Essential Oils Encapsulated in Liposomes: A Review.” Journal of Liposome Research 23, no. 4 (December 2013): 268–75. https://doi.org/10.3109/08982104.2013.819888.

6 Aldrich, Esther, and Randall Bornemann.Fang Xiang Liao Fa: Essential Oil Analogues of TCM Herbal Formulas. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. p. 42.

7 Harb, Tracy, Misa Matsuyama, Michael David, and Rebecca J. Hill. “Infant Colic-What Works: A Systematic Review of Interventions for Breast-Fed Infants.” Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 62, no. 5 (2016): 668–86. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPG.0000000000001075.

8 Ostad, S. N., M. Soodi, M. Shariffzadeh, N. Khorshidi, and H. Marzban. “The Effect of Fennel Essential Oil on Uterine Contraction as a Model for Dysmenorrhea, Pharmacology and Toxicology Study.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 76, no. 3 (August 2001): 299–304.

9 Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi, Ahmad-Reza Dehpour, Saeed Mohammadi Motamed, Maryam Yazdanparast, Mohsen Chamanara, Mousa Sahebgharani, and Amir Rashidian. “Foeniculum Vulgare Essential Oil Ameliorates Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats through the Inhibition of NF-KB Pathway.” Inflammopharmacology 26, no. 3 (June 2018): 851–59. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10787-017-0409-1.

10 Al-Amoudi, Wael M. “Protective Effects of Fennel Oil Extract against Sodium Valproate-Induced Hepatorenal Damage in Albino Rats.” Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences 24, no. 4 (May 2017): 915–24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2016.10.021.

11 Sheweita, Salah A., Lobna S. El-Hosseiny, and Munther A. Nashashibi. “Protective Effects of Essential Oils as Natural Antioxidants against Hepatotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice.” PloS One 11, no. 11 (2016): e0165667. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0165667.

12 Sheweita, Salah A., Lobna S. El-Hosseiny, and Munther A. Nashashibi. “Protective Effects of Essential Oils as Natural Antioxidants against Hepatotoxicity Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice.” PloS One 11, no. 11 (2016): e0165667. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0165667.

13 Mesfin, Miraf, Kaleab Asres, and Workineh Shibeshi. “Evaluation of Anxiolytic Activity of the Essential Oil of the Aerial Part of Foeniculum Vulgare Miller in Mice.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 14 (August 23, 2014): 310. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-14-310.

14 “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed October 28, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

15 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. p. 981.

16 Aldrich, Esther, and Randall Bornemann.Fang Xiang Liao Fa: Essential Oil Analogues of TCM Herbal Formulas. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. p. 42.

17 Dosoky, Noura S., and William N. Setzer. “Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Essential Oils of Curcuma Species.” Nutrients 10, no. 9 (September 1, 2018). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091196.

18 Liju, Vijayastelter B., Kottarapat Jeena, and Ramadasan Kuttan. “An Evaluation of Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Antinociceptive Activities of Essential Oil from Curcuma Longa. L.” Indian Journal of Pharmacology 43, no. 5 (September 2011): 526–31. https://doi.org/10.4103/0253-7613.84961.

19 Dosoky, Noura S., and William N. Setzer. “Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Essential Oils of Curcuma Species.” Nutrients 10, no. 9 (September 1, 2018). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091196.

20 “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed October 28, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

21 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. p. 1547.

22 Aldrich, Esther, and Randall Bornemann.Fang Xiang Liao Fa: Essential Oil Analogues of TCM Herbal Formulas. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. P 42.

23 Naseri, Mohsen, Faraz Mojab, Mahmood Khodadoost, Mohammad Kamalinejad, Ali Davati, Rasol Choopani, Abbas Hasheminejad, Zahra Bararpoor, Shamsa Shariatpanahi, and Majid Emtiazy. “The Study of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Oil-Based Dill (Anethum Graveolens L.) Extract Used Topically in Formalin-Induced Inflammation Male Rat Paw.” Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research: IJPR 11, no. 4 (2012): 1169–74.

24 Hajhashemi, Valiollah, and Naser Abbasi. “Hypolipidemic Activity of Anethum Graveolens in Rats.” Phytotherapy Research: PTR 22, no. 3 (March 2008): 372–75. https://doi.org/10.1002/ptr.2329.

25 “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed October 28, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

26 Aldrich, Esther, and Randall Bornemann.Fang Xiang Liao Fa: Essential Oil Analogues of TCM Herbal Formulas. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. p. 42.

27 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. p. 954.

28 Aldrich, Esther, and Randall Bornemann.Fang Xiang Liao Fa: Essential Oil Analogues of TCM Herbal Formulas. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. p. 47.

29 Raskovic, A., I. Milanovic, N. Pavlovic, B. Milijasevic, M. Ubavic, and M. Mikov. “Analgesic Effects of Rosemary Essential Oil and Its Interactions with Codeine and Paracetamol in Mice.” European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences 19, no. 1 (January 2015): 165–72.

30 Kim, Myung-Ja, Eun-Sook Nam, and Seun-In Paik. “[The effects of aromatherapy on pain, depression, and life satisfaction of arthritis patients].” Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi 35, no. 1 (February 2005): 186–94.

31 Sagorchev, P., J. Lukanov, and A. M. Beer. “Investigations into the Specific Effects of Rosemary Oil at the Receptor Level.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 17, no. 8–9 (July 2010): 693–97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.012.

32 Rašković, Aleksandar, Isidora Milanović, Nebojša Pavlović, Tatjana Ćebović, Saša Vukmirović, and Momir Mikov. “Antioxidant Activity of Rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis L.) Essential Oil and Its Hepatoprotective Potential.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 14 (July 7, 2014): 225. https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-14-225.

33 “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed October 28, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

34 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. p. 1396.

Image by Walter Baxter, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14405422

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