Jul 7 17

How These Five Remedies and Treatments Help Reduce Symptoms from Lyme Disease, Parasites, and Mold

by Greg

For people who suspect they have multiple infections including Lyme disease, co-infections, parasites, and mold
by Greg Lee

Fireworks have gotten more spectacular since I was a kid. At a recent Independence Day celebration, my kids and I were dazzled by an amazing display that burst forth from a single white firework shooting up into the night. Then, several yellow streamers of light slowly fell in a shower which also whistled. Suddenly, blue, red, green, and white sparkles blossomed forth. We kept saying, “Ooooh and aaaah!” with each new spray of color.

How is a complex fireworks show similar to recurring symptoms from unknown infections?

Just like a fireworks display shooting across the night, multiple infections can trigger bursts of unexpected symptoms
Some patients with stealthy infections like Lyme disease, mold, or parasites can have relapsing symptoms that can randomly appear and disappear. Unfortunately, these infections may not show up on blood1, saliva, or stool2 tests. Carlotta felt run down ever since she got sick with mononucleosis as a teenager. She would have occasional bouts of migrating pain, memory recall issues, and vision problems. Lab tests couldn’t identify the underlying reason for her symptoms. Multiple medical providers suggested that she go see a counselor or psychiatrist, which she ignored. Her symptoms would flare up during phases of her menstrual cycle, during a full moon, and in response to eating carbohydrates.  Not only food but also medications made her symptoms worse.

Her flu-like symptoms of would flare up when she took antibiotics
Carlotta’s symptoms increased when she took antibiotics for sinus problems. The toxic die off from drug treatment dramatically increased her flu-like symptoms of fatigue, brain fog, and misspeaking words. She felt that her immune system was producing too much inflammation in response to some unknown infection. Unfortunately, over the counter medications did little to relieve her symptoms.

Anti-inflammatory medications didn’t help much
Non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin, Advil, and Aleve took the edge off some of her flu-like symptoms. Dietary changes helped reduce symptoms however they would flare up for unknown reasons and when she ate food with wheat or sugar.

What else can help to reduce fatigue, brain fog, and flu-like symptoms from hidden infections?

Here are five multi-microbial treatments that can help with reducing symptoms from multiple types of infections
Carlotta received an electrodermal scan which detected the electrical frequencies of Lyme disease and parasitic worms in her intestines and liver. The scan also detected frequencies of mold in her sinuses. She received a combination of microparticle remedies called liposomal essential oils and liposomal herbs, and treatments to help with reduce recurring symptoms from her multiple infections. These remedies have also reduced toxins and inflammatory compounds in multiple lab studies.

Multi-microbial Treatment #1: Clove bud
This herb has acrid and warm properties. In lab and animal studies, clove bud has an inhibitory effect against Vibrio cholerae, Bacillus anthracis, Salmonella typhi, Corynebacterium diptheriae, Bacillus dysenteriae, E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, Staphlococcus aureus3, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)4, Enterococcus faecalis5, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa6. Biflorin, a compound in clove buds, protected against bacterial endotoxins, and inflammatory compounds tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL-6) in a mouse study7. This herb has been recommended for the treatment of worms and parasites in humans8.

In Chinese medicine, it is used to warm the abdomen and relieve pain. Clove is also used to treat hiccups, nausea, morning sickness, vomiting, and diarrhea. This herb is also used to treat impotence, and coldness in the body and extremities. It also promotes digestion by increasing bile and gastric acid secretions. Clove is also used topically to treat toothache. The essential oil has anti-asthmatic properties.

Essential oil of clove contains these compounds: eugenol, caryophyllene, acetyleugenol, α- caryophyllene, and chavicol. In unpublished research, clove essential oil dissolves the borrelia biofilm and kills the spirochete form of the Lyme. In another study, clove essential oil inhibits Candida, Aspergillus, and some dematophytes including fluconazole resistant strains9. In another study, the compound eugenol was effective at inhibiting different fungi including Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus species, Mucor species, Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum gypseum10. In a third study, clove essential oil increased the effectiveness of fluconazole and voriconazole against multiple Candida species11. In another study, this essential oil was effective at inhibiting drug resistant Candida biofilms12. Low internal doses of clove essential oil have been used safely and effectively for years with patients diagnosed with Lyme disease, parasites, and mold toxicity. This herb is contraindicated in cases of fever and excess internal heat accompanied with symptoms of dryness. Side effects of this herb include dizziness, palpitations, chest oppression, headache, perspiration, decreased blood pressure, and skin rash. In addition to clove, cinnamon can be effective against many different microbes and parasites.

Multi-microbial Treatment#2: Cinnamon bark
The properties of this herb are acrid, sweet, and hot. Cinnamon has an inhibitory effect on dermatophytes, pathogenic fungi, and many gram positive bacteria13. In a lab study, cinnamon compounds inhibited the malaria parasite14. These compounds are succinic acid, glutathione, L-aspartic acid, beta-alanine, and 2-methylbutyryl glycine. Given the similarity between malaria and the Babesia, this herb may be effective against this co-infection. Another compound, cinnamaldehyde, has inhibits parasitic worms in a lab study15. Cinnamon was also effective at reducing parasitic cysts of Giardia in a rat study16.

This herb also contains the following active compounds: cinnamic aldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl acetate, phenylpropyl acetate, cinncassiol-A, -B, -C1, -C2, -C3, cinnzelanine, and cinnzeylanol.

This herb is used to treat a wide variety of disorders including intolerance to cold, cold extremities, weakness, soreness and coldness of the low back and knees, impotence, lack of libido, excess urine production, and loose stools. It is also used to treat wheezing, asthma, labored breathing, swelling, and profuse phlegm. Cinnamon is also used for dizziness, flushed face, sore throat, and coldness in the lower extremities. This herb also treats epigastric and abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, gas, bloating, slow digestion, hernia pain, and spasmodic pain in the stomach and intestines. It is also used to treat hypercoagulation, irregular menstruation, amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, postpartum pain, external injuries, trauma, deep rooted sores, psoriasis, and feelings of oppression in the abdomen.

Cinnamon is contraindicated during pregnancy and in patients with signs of excess heat, excess dryness, and excess bleeding. Excess amount of cinnamon can result in symptoms of flushed face, red eyes, dry mouth and tongue, bleeding, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, excess urination, anuria, burning sensations upon urination, excess serum proteins in the urine, dizziness, blurred vision, and numbness of the tongue.

Intravenous cinnamon reduced blood pressure, decreased heart rate, peripheral vasodilation, and decreased vessel resistance within 3-5 minutes. Subcutaneous injection of cinnamon in dogs increased the white blood cell count by 150 – 200%. In a rat study, essential oil of cinnamon has an analgesic and sedative effect.

In unpublished research, cinnamon bark essential oil dissolves the Lyme disease biofilm and kills the spirochete form. Cinnamon bark essential oil was effective at inhibiting Aspergillus and Penicillium mold species17. Cinnamon bark essential oil inhibits Aspergillus species and aflatoxin, aflatoxin-B1, and aflatoxin-G1 production. These toxins are inhibited because the essential oil binds to the DNA of aflatoxins. Also, this essential oil reacts with reactive oxygen species produced by aflatoxins, which has a protective effect on cells18. In another study, cinnamon bark essential oil was the most effective against oral isolates of Candida albicans19. Another study demonstrated that cinnamon bark essential oil was effective against fluconazole susceptible Candida species20. Liposomal cinnamon oil was effective at inhibiting MRSA and it’s biofilms in a lab study21. Low dilutions of liposomal cinnamon essential oil have been taken internally by people diagnosed with multiple infections safely with out side-effects. In addition to cinnamon, artemisia has antimicrobial effects against many pathogens.

Multi-microbial Treatment#3: Artemisia
Artemisia and its derivative compounds, artemisinin, liposomal artemisinin, and artesenuate, are being used by physicians to fight Babesia infections. Artemisinin has been used effectively with other anti-protozoa medications to cure relapsing Babesia22. Artemisinin has also been effective in multiple studies against cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma gondii (protozoa), Schistosoma species and Fasciola hepatica (worms) and Cryptococcus neoformans (fungi)23.

This herb is recommended for treating leptospirosis and Lyme disease in Chinese medicine24. Artemisia annua is also effective in inhibiting Staphylococcus aureus (staph), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), Corynebacterium diphtheriae (diphtheria), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus dysenteriae (dysentery), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (tuberculosis)25. Using the whole herb instead of a derivative compound increases the benefits by including other active compounds. Multiple sesquiterpene and flavonoid compounds from Artemisia annua neutralized the effects of bacterial toxins in a lab study26. Artemisia annua contains rosmarinic acid which demonstrated a synergistic interaction with artemisinin against the malaria protozoa in a lab study27. This herb and it’s compound artemisinin inhibited the production of bacterial endotoxins and the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in a rat study28.

Artemisia annua has the properties of clears heat, treats malaria, cools the blood, clears liver heat, and brightens the eyes. It is also used to treat “steaming bone disorder” or the feeling that one’s bones are being cooked, tidal fever, unremitting low-grade fever, thirst, soreness and weakness of the low back and knees, irritability, and heat in the palms, soles, and the middle of the chest. Other symptoms this herb is used to treat are warmth at night and chills in the morning, absence of perspiration, heavy limbs, stifling sensation in the chest, and a flushed face. This herb also treats red eyes, dizziness, photophobia, arrhythmia, and jaundice.

This herb is cautioned in patients with diarrhea and coldness in the stomach. Azole antifungals and calcium channel blockers may present significant herb-drug interactions with this herb. In long term studies, this herb had no adverse effects on vital organs29. In addition to artemisia, ionic silver has multiple anti-microbial properties.

Multi-microbial Treatment#4: Silver Nanoparticles
Silver nanoparticles have been used safely and effectively to inhibit many drug resistant and biofilm forming bacteria and fungi including Streptococcus mutans30, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa31, Escherichia coli32, and Enterococcus faecalis33. Silver particles are also effective at inhibiting multiple species of pathogenic fungi and their toxins34. This form of silver has also been effective against multiple protozoa including Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria)35. In water studies, silver has also been effective at reducing the amount of helminth (worm) eggs in waste water36.

When in combination with cinnamon bark, silver inhibits H7N3 influenza A virus a lab experiment37. When combined with tea tree essential oil in a microparticle liposome, silver greatly enhances the antimicrobial and anti-toxin properties against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans38. In addition to silver, Microcurrent offers a highly flexible and targeted treatment for inhibiting pathogens, toxins, and resulting inflammation.

Multi-microbial Treatment#5: Frequency Specific Microcurrent
Frequency Specific Microcurrent (FSM) is amazingly targeted and customizable form of electrical frequency treatment for chronic infections39. Carlotta received anti-microbial, anti-toxin, anti-inflammatory frequencies directed into her sinuses, liver, intestines, and memory regions of the brain. Frequencies were also applied to neutralize mold toxins, inhibit spirochetes, fungi and parasites, and reduce brain and intestinal inflammation. She also received frequencies for increasing adrenal energy, disrupting biofilms in her sinuses, and zapping intracellular infections. With each microcurrent treatment, she felt less toxic and less inflamed, more energetic, and was able to find and speak words with greater clarity. Multiple remedies and treatment may be effective at reducing symptoms from Lyme, parasites and mold, toxins, and resulting inflammation.

Using multiple treatments, patients report faster improvements in their chronic infection symptoms
Similar to a dazzling multi-stage fireworks display, the proper combination of treatments and liposomal remedies may give your immune system a burst of energy to fight multiple types of infections including Lyme disease, parasites and mold. These treatments may also help to neutralize toxins and lower inflammation. For the first time in years, Carlotta looked forward to going to her kid’s sporting events with an abundance of energy. She remembered her family’s activity schedule without having to look at a calendar. She restarted movement classes since her migrating pains had ceased. Since liposomal remedies require specific training on their formulation and come with cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate natural practitioner to develop a safe and effective strategy for addressing symptoms from multiple infections.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where treatment or remedies helped you reduce symptoms from Lyme, parasites and mold? Tell us about it.

>> Next step: Come to our live evening lecture: Getting Rid of Lyme Disease in Frederick, Maryland on Monday July 10th at 6pm to learn more about treatments and remedies for multiple infections, natural methods for reducing neurological problems, inflammation, and pain caused by Lyme disease, co-infections, parasites, and mold. http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

 

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2. Klinghardt, D. A Deep Look Beyond Lyme. 2012 Physician’s Round Table. January 28th, 2012. Tampa, FL.
3. Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 461 – 462.

4. Warnke, Patrick H., Stephan T. Becker, Rainer Podschun, Sureshan Sivananthan, Ingo N. Springer, Paul A. J. Russo, Joerg Wiltfang, Helmut Fickenscher, and Eugene Sherry. “The Battle against Multi-Resistant Strains: Renaissance of Antimicrobial Essential Oils as a Promising Force to Fight Hospital-Acquired Infections.” Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery: Official Publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 37, no. 7 (October 2009): 392–97. doi:10.1016/j.jcms.2009.03.017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19473851
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21501041

7. Lee, Hwi-Ho, Ji-Sun Shin, Woo-Seok Lee, Byeol Ryu, Dae Sik Jang, and Kyung-Tae Lee. “Biflorin, Isolated from the Flower Buds of Syzygium Aromaticum L., Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Mediators via STAT1 Inactivation in Macrophages and Protects Mice from Endotoxin Shock.” Journal of Natural Products 79, no. 4 (April 22, 2016): 711–20. doi:10.1021/acs.jnatprod.5b00609. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26977531
8. Clark, Hulda Regehr. The Cure for All Diseases: With Many Case Histories. 1st edition. San Diego: New Century Press, 1995. p. 341.
9. Pinto E, Vale-Silva L, Cavaleiro C, Salgueiro L. Antifungal activity of the clove essential oil from Syzygium aromaticum on Candida, Aspergillus and dermatophyte species. J Med Microbiol. 2009 Nov;58(Pt 11):1454-62. Epub 2009 Jul 9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19589904
10. Inder Singh Rana, A. S. Rana, R. C. Rajak. Evaluation of antifungal activity in essential oil of the Syzygium aromaticum (L.) by extraction, purification and analysis of its main component eugenol. Brazilian Journal of Microbiology (2011) 42: 1269-1277 ISSN 1517-8382 http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1517-83822011000400004&script=sci_arttext
11. Rózalska B, Sadowska B, Wieckowska-Szakiel M, Budzyńska A. [The synergism of antifungals and essential oils against Candida spp. evaluated by a modified gradient-diffusion method]. Med Dosw Mikrobiol. 2011;63(2):163-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22184911
12. Khan MS, Ahmad I. Biofilm inhibition by Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils in the strains of Candida albicans. J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Mar 27;140(2):416-23. Epub 2012 Feb 2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22326355
13. Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., p. 447 – 449.
14. Parvazi, Shirin, Sedigheh Sadeghi, Mehri Azadi, Maryam Mohammadi, Mohammad Arjmand, Farideh Vahabi, Somye Sadeghzadeh, and Zahra Zamani. “The Effect of Aqueous Extract of Cinnamon on the Metabolome of Plasmodium Falciparum Using 1HNMR Spectroscopy.” Journal of Tropical Medicine 2016 (2016). doi:10.1155/2016/3174841.
15. Williams, Andrew R., Aina Ramsay, Tina V. A. Hansen, Honorata M. Ropiak, Helena Mejer, Peter Nejsum, Irene Mueller-Harvey, and Stig M. Thamsborg. “Anthelmintic Activity of Trans-Cinnamaldehyde and A- and B-Type Proanthocyanidins Derived from Cinnamon (Cinnamomum Verum).” Scientific Reports 5 (September 30, 2015). doi:10.1038/srep14791. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4588565/
16. Mahmoud, Abeer, Rasha ATTIA, Safaa SAID, and Zedan IBRAHEIM. “Ginger and Cinnamon: Can This Household Remedy Treat Giardiasis? Parasitological and Histopathological Studies.” Iranian Journal of Parasitology 9, no. 4 (2014): 530–40.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4345092/
17. Singh G, Maurya S, DeLampasona MP, Catalan CA. A comparison of chemical, antioxidant and antimicrobial studies of cinnamon leaf and bark volatile oils, oleoresins and their constituents. Food Chem Toxicol. 2007 Sep;45(9):1650-61. Epub 2007 Feb 28. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17408833
18. Lokman Alpsoy. Inhibitory Effect of Essential Oil on Aflatoxin Activity. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(17), pp. 2474-2481, 19 April, 2010www.ajol.info/index.php/ajb/article/view/79702/69978
19. Carvalhinho S, Costa AM, Coelho AC, Martins E, Sampaio A. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses. Mycopathologia. 2012 Jul;174(1):69-76. Epub 2012 Jan 14. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22246961
20. Pozzatti P, Scheid LA, Spader TB, Atayde ML, Santurio JM, Alves SH. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from plants used as spices against fluconazole-resistant and fluconazole-susceptible Candida spp. Can J Microbiol. 2008 Nov;54(11):950-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18997851
21. Cui, Haiying, Wei Li, Changzhu Li, Saritporn Vittayapadung, and Lin Lin. “Liposome Containing Cinnamon Oil with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilm.” Biofouling 32, no. 2 (2016): 215–25. doi:10.1080/08927014.2015.1134516.
22. Krause, Peter. Panel: Genetic and Acquired Determinants of Host Susceptibility and Vulnerable Populations at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences: A Workshop on the Critical Needs and Gaps in Understanding Prevention, Amelioration, and Resolution of Lyme and Other Tick-borne Diseases: the Short-Term and Long-Term Outcomes. Washington, DC. October 11, 2010
23. Ho, Wanxing Eugene, Hong Yong Peh, Tze Khee Chan, and W. S. Fred Wong. “Artemisinins: Pharmacological Actions beyond Anti-Malarial.” Pharmacology & Therapeutics 142, no. 1 (April 2014): 126–39. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2013.12.001.
24. Dharmananda, S. Lyme Disease: Treatment with Chinese Herbs http://www.itmonline.org/arts/lyme.htm
25. Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., pp. 244-246
26. Zhu, Xiaoxin X., Lan Yang, Yujie J. Li, Dong Zhang, Ying Chen, Petra Kostecká, Eva Kmoníčková, and Zdeněk Zídek. “Effects of Sesquiterpene, Flavonoid and Coumarin Types of Compounds from Artemisia Annua L. on Production of Mediators of Angiogenesis.” Pharmacological Reports: PR 65, no. 2 (2013): 410–20. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23744425
27. Suberu, John O., Alexander P. Gorka, Lauren Jacobs, Paul D. Roepe, Neil Sullivan, Guy C. Barker, and Alexei A. Lapkin. “Anti-Plasmodial Polyvalent Interactions in Artemisia Annua L. Aqueous Extract–Possible Synergistic and Resistance Mechanisms.” PloS One 8, no. 11 (2013): e80790. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0080790. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3828274/
28. Tan, Y., Y. Zhao, Q. Lin, G. Xie, P. Yang, and X. Yin. “[Experimental study on antiendotoxin effect of extracts from Artemisia annua L].” Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi = Zhongguo Zhongyao Zazhi = China Journal of Chinese Materia Medica 24, no. 3 (March 1999): 166–71, 192. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12242801
29. Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., pp. 244-246.
30. Pérez-Díaz, Mario Alberto, Laura Boegli, Garth James, Cristina Velasquillo, Roberto Sánchez-Sánchez, Rita-Elizabeth Martínez-Martínez, Gabriel Alejandro Martínez-Castañón, and Fidel Martinez-Gutierrez. “Silver Nanoparticles with Antimicrobial Activities against Streptococcus Mutans and Their Cytotoxic Effect.” Materials Science & Engineering. C, Materials for Biological Applications 55 (October 2015): 360–66. doi:10.1016/j.msec.2015.05.036.
31. Yang, Jae Wook, Jae-won Choi, Sul Gee Lee, and Dong Soo Kim. “Antibacterial Properties of Artificial Eyes Containing Nano-Sized Particle Silver.” Orbit (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 30, no. 2 (March 2011): 77–81. doi:10.3109/01676830.2010.538123.
32. Pathak, Satya P., and K. Gopal. “Evaluation of Bactericidal Efficacy of Silver Ions on Escherichia Coli for Drinking Water Disinfection.” Environmental Science and Pollution Research International 19, no. 6 (July 2012): 2285–90. doi:10.1007/s11356-011-0735-6.
33. Wu, Daming, Wei Fan, Anil Kishen, James L. Gutmann, and Bing Fan. “Evaluation of the Antibacterial Efficacy of Silver Nanoparticles against Enterococcus Faecalis Biofilm.” Journal of Endodontics 40, no. 2 (February 2014): 285–90. doi:10.1016/j.joen.2013.08.022.
34. Pulit, Jolanta, Marcin Banach, Renata Szczygłowska, and Mirosław Bryk. “Nanosilver against Fungi. Silver Nanoparticles as an Effective Biocidal Factor.” Acta Biochimica Polonica 60, no. 4 (2013): 795–98.
35. “Silver Nanoparticles Treat Lyme (July 2016) Townsend Letter, Alternative Medicine Magazine.” Accessed July 7, 2017. http://www.townsendletter.com/July2016/silver0716.html.
36. Orta De Velásquez, M. T., I. Yáñez-Noguez, B. Jiménez-Cisneros, and V. M. Luna Pabello. “Adding Silver and Copper to Hydrogen Peroxide and Peracetic Acid in the Disinfection of an Advanced Primary Treatment Effluent.” Environmental Technology 29, no. 11 (November 2008): 1209–17. doi:10.1080/09593330802270632.
37. Fatima, Munazza, Najam-Us-Sahar Sadaf Zaidi, Deeba Amraiz, and Farhan Afzal. “In Vitro Antiviral Activity of Cinnamomum Cassia and Its Nanoparticles Against H7N3 Influenza A Virus.” Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 26, no. 1 (January 2016): 151–59. doi:10.4014/jmb.1508.08024.
38. Low, W. L., C. Martin, D. J. Hill, and M. A. Kenward. “Antimicrobial Efficacy of Liposome-Encapsulated Silver Ions and Tea Tree Oil against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Staphylococcus Aureus and Candida Albicans.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 57, no. 1 (July 2013): 33–39. doi:10.1111/lam.12082.
39. McMakin C. Frequency Specific Microcurrent in Pain Management. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier; 2011.

Jun 23 17

Chronic Lyme Summit 2 Takeaways so far…

by Greg

Hey it’s Greg here…

Today is the fifth day of the Chronic Lyme Summit 2!

Over the past 5 days, several experts have shared new and innovative recommendations for diagnosing and treating Lyme disease, co-infections, parasites, etc.

Dr. Klinghardt talked about using ultrasound to enhance Lyme and co-infection testing.

Dr. Dahlgren shared about anti-parasite remedies like mimosa pudica and garlic.

Dr. Anderson talked about 40% of Lyme patients that are not improving have mast cell activation syndrome.

Here are more takeaways: Chronic Lyme Summit 2 Online – Free broadcast link

Awesome talks, more to come!

Greg

Not signed up to hear the free Chronic Lyme Summit?

>>> Sign me up to hear about the latest Lyme remedies
and treatments on the Chronic Lyme Summit 2 happening now <<<<

Jun 19 17

What are your biggest insights, takeaways from today’s Chronic Lyme Summit 2 speakers?

by Greg

Hey it’s Greg here…

Today is the first day of the Chronic Lyme Summit 2!

Today’s speakers are Dr. Wayne Anderson, Dr. James
Maskell, Scott Fosgren, Dr. Phillip Blair, and Dr. Jay Davidson.

Please feel free to share what was the most important thing
that you heard on the summit today. And check out what other
people are learning…

>>> Please click here to share your biggest insights
and takeaways from today’s speakers <<<

Peace,

Greg

Not signed up to hear the free Chronic Lyme Summit?

>>> Sign me up to hear about the latest Lyme remedies
and treatments on the Chronic Lyme Summit 2 happening now <<<<

May 28 17

#8 Challenge to Healing Lyme Disease: Secondary Infections

by Greg

One issue came up over and over again as I looked through
the over thousand responses to my question,
“What are the biggest challenges to healing Lyme disease?”
The #8 challenge from their responses is secondary infections
like C. Diff, Candida, drug resistant Staph / MARCONs. Many
of these people reported an increase in these infections after
receiving antibiotic treatment.
I’ll be sharing TREATMENTS and REMEDIES for overcoming
this and many other challenges to healing Lyme on my Chronic
Lyme Summit 2 interview.
The Summit will be broadcast online next month for Free from

June 19th – June 26th.

Peace and healing,

Greg
May 17 17

Sign up to hear the Chronic Lyme Summit 2 on June 19-26 for Free!

by Greg

A few weeks ago, over a thousand people shared their biggest
challenges to healing Lyme disease to help me prepare for my

interview on the Chronic Lyme Summit 2!

It has taken me a few weeks to analyze the survey results since

many went into great detail… (awesome!)

Anyway…

I promised to share the Top Five Challenges that were submitted

and the TREATMENTS and REMEDIES for these specific

challenges on my Chronic Lyme Summit 2 interview.

The Summit will be broadcast online next month for FREE from

June 19th – June 26th.

So If you’d like to get notified of the schedule for when you
can hear the 35 Lyme disease speakers, sign up here:

Apr 30 17

How These Five Essential Oils Cool the Burning Pains of Bartonella and Lyme Disease

by Greg

For people with Bartonella and Lyme disease that struggle with burning pains in their hands and feet
by Greg Lee

Do you know what music teachers say about learning to play an instrument? “Practice, practice, practice.” My daughter is learning to play the clarinet. She is doing well follow along with the notes on the music sheet. Sometimes she enjoys making hilarious squeaks and some really loud honking sounds just for fun.

How is a squeaky, loud clarinet similar to the burning pains of a Bartonella / Lyme infection?

Similar to squeaky clarinet sounds, people with Bartonella and Lyme can have “loud” burning pains in their extremities
Patients diagnosed with Bartonella and Lyme disease often report a wide variety of painful symptoms including: joint pain[1], muscle pain[2], lymph node pain, abdominal discomfort[3], and uncomfortable symptoms of polyneuropathy/nerve damage: weakness, tingling, prickling, awkward gait, and numbness[4]. One of the most urgent and often debilitating symptoms that people report is burning pain in the hands, feet and extremities[5]. Burning symptoms are often worse in the morning and may improve over time or with movement. One theory is that nerve damage is an underlying cause of these burning symptoms[6]. Looking at other illnesses with similar burning pain sensations may provide new insights into relieving these hot, painful symptoms.

In addition to Bartonella, people with a condition called erythromelalgia report similar symptoms of burning pain in their hands and feet
“Erythromelalgia is a rare condition that primarily affects the feet and, less commonly, the hands (extremities). It is characterized by intense, burning pain of affected extremities, severe redness (erythema), and increased skin temperature that may be episodic or almost continuous in nature.[7]” People with erythromelalgia reported their pain attacks being triggered by heat or exercise and relieved mainly by cooling methods[8]. A large proportion of these pain attacks often do not involve a specific trigger. An important discovery connects a specific genetic mutation with enhanced pain sensitivity in people with erythromelalgia.

The intensity of burning symptoms in erythromelalgia patients is correlated with a mutation in a gene called SCN9A
The SCN9A gene affects the functioning of sodium channel called NaV1.7[9]. This channel is a pathway for transmission of pain signals. Genetic mutations affecting NaV1.7 may blunt the ability to sense pain[10] or dramatically increase pain sensitivity[11]. Researchers are looking at tarantulas for a possible remedy for relieving the the burning pain sensations.

Green velvet tarantula venom contains a peptide that may help to reduce burning pains by affecting the NaV1.7 channel[12]
In mouse experiments, this peptide was effective a reducing the pain sensations by blocking the NaV1.7 channel. Finding and testing at tarantula-based NaV1.7 medication will likely take years to develop.

What else may help with reducing burning hand and feet pain in people with Lyme disease and Bartonella?

A compound found in essential oils also blocks the pain signals in the NaV1.7 channel
There is a compound called methyl eugenol that was effective in inhibiting nerve signals in NaV1.7 channels in a lab experiment[13]. In animal studies, this compound has demonstrated anesthetic and the ability to block pain signals[14]. This compound is approved by the FDA for use as a flavoring agent that can be directly and safely added to food[15]. Caution: rodent studies on methyl eugenol have produce cancer tumors in their livers[16]. Processing these oils into a microparticle called a liposome may increase their ability to penetrate into nerve cells to enhance pain relief[17]. All of these essential oils are classified as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration).

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #1: Sweet Basil
In lab studies, methyl eugenol content in basil essential oil varied from 1.5% – 78% depending upon the country of origin[18]. Turkish sweet basil had the highest content of methyl eugenol. This essential oil is classified by the FDA as GRAS[19]. In animal studies, this essential oil demonstrated analgesic effects on chronic non-inflammatory pain such as fibromyalgia[20] and the ability to block pain signals[21]. This herb has been used traditionally to treat nerve pain, convulsions and a variety of neurodegenerative disorders[22]. In addition to basil, bay laurel essential oil has pain relieving properties.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #2: Bay Laurel
This essential oil has been found to contain up to 9% methyl eugenol[23]. In animal studies, this oil has demonstrated pain relieving effects[24]. In other studies, bay laurel essential oil inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and it’s biofilms[25] and Candida species and it’s biofilms[26]. Bay Laurel essential oil has FDA GRAS status[27]. In addition to bay laurel, rose essential oil also has pain relieving properties.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #3: Rose
Rose essential oil may contain up to 3.5% methyl eugenol[28]. In human studies, rose essential oil provided pain relief in patients with dysmenorrhea[29] and renal colic[30]. In a lab study, rose oil demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and, Staphylococcus aureus[31]. Rose essential oil has FDA GRAS status[32]. Clary sage essential oil also contains methyl eugenol.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #4: Clary Sage
Clary sage essential oil may contain up to 2% methyl eugenol. This oil was effective at reduce labor pains in a human study[33]. A combination of clary sage with other essential oils helped to reduce menstrual cramps[34]. In lab studies, clary sage essential oil was effective against Staphylococcus clinical strains resistant to antibiotics[35] and in combination with juniper essential oil demonstrated anti-yeast properties[36]. Clary sage is classified as FDA GRAS[37]. Lemon balm essential oil also contains methyl eugenol.

Burning Pain Relief Essential Oil #5: Lemon Balm
Lemon balm essential oil may contain up to 1% methyl eugenol[38]. In animal studies, this essential oil was effective at reducing neuropathy pain[39] and inflammation[40]. Lemon balm oil is also effective against Candida albicans[41], herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2[42], cutaneous leishmaniosis[43], Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes[44] in lab studies. Lemon balm essential oil is classified at FDA GRAS[45]. Multiple essential oils may help with reducing how patients feel burning pain by disrupting signals transmitted along the NaV1.7 pathway.

These five essential oils may help to reduce burning pain caused by Bartonella and Lyme disease
People with Lyme disease and Bartonella and Lyme disease that report burning pains in their hands, feet, and extremities may be helped by research into a similar painful illness called erythromelalgia. Just like getting a child to play their instrument at a harmonious level, these essential oils contain a compound called methyl eugenol that may help to reduce the intensity of burning pains by blocking the pain signals along the NaV1.7 pathway. Some of these remedies may also help with reducing inflammation and other types of pain. Processing these essential oils into microparticle liposome remedies may enhance their ability to penetrate inside of nerve cells and improve pain relief. Since formulating essential oils into liposomal remedies requires special knowledge and equipment, work with a Lyme / liposomal literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a customized, safe, and effective treatment plan for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday May 1st at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Bartonella and Lyme disease burning pain, co-infections, and inflammation symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to reduce burning pains from Bartonella and Lyme disease? Tell us about it.


[1] Arvikar, Sheila L., and Allen C. Steere. “Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Arthritis.” Infectious Disease Clinics of North America 29, no. 2 (June 2015): 269–80. doi:10.1016/j.idc.2015.02.004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4443866/

[2] Garakani, Amir, and Andrew G. Mitton. “New-Onset Panic, Depression with Suicidal Thoughts, and Somatic Symptoms in a Patient with a History of Lyme Disease.” Case Reports in Psychiatry 2015 (2015): 457947. doi:10.1155/2015/457947.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25922779

[3] Mazur-Melewska, Katarzyna, Anna Mania, Paweł Kemnitz, Magdalena Figlerowicz, and Wojciech Służewski. “Cat-Scratch Disease: A Wide Spectrum of Clinical Pictures.” Advances in Dermatology and Allergology/Postȩpy Dermatologii I Alergologii 32, no. 3 (June 2015): 216–20. doi:10.5114/pdia.2014.44014.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4495109/

[4] “Polyneuropathy.” Wikipedia, April 10, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Polyneuropathy&oldid=774727139.

[5] Horowitz, Richard. Why Can’t I Get Better? Solving the Mystery of Lyme and Chronic Disease. Macmillan, 2013.  P. 75.

[6] “Lyme and Tick-Borne Diseases Research Center.” Accessed April 29, 2017. http://asp.cumc.columbia.edu/lymedisease/askthedr/for_pt/displayanswer1-lyme.asp?Departments=LymeDisease&Controlnumber=4824.

[7] “Erythromelalgia – NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders).” NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders). Accessed April 29, 2017. https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/erythromelalgia/.

[8] McDonnell, Aoibhinn, Betsy Schulman, Zahid Ali, Sulayman D. Dib-Hajj, Fiona Brock, Sonia Cobain, Tina Mainka, Jan Vollert, Sanela Tarabar, and Stephen G. Waxman. “Inherited Erythromelalgia due to Mutations in SCN9A: Natural History, Clinical Phenotype and Somatosensory Profile.” Brain: A Journal of Neurology 139, no. Pt 4 (April 2016): 1052–65. doi:10.1093/brain/aww007.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26920677

[9] Kim, David Ta, Elsa Rossignol, Kinda Najem, and Luis H. Ospina. “Bilateral Congenital Corneal Anesthesia in a Patient with SCN9A Mutation, Confirmed Primary Erythromelalgia, and Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder.” Journal of AAPOS: The Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus 19, no. 5 (October 2015): 478–79. doi:10.1016/j.jaapos.2015.05.015.

[10] Remacle, Albert G., Sonu Kumar, Khatereh Motamedchaboki, Piotr Cieplak, Swathi Hullugundi, Jennifer Dolkas, Veronica I. Shubayev, and Alex Y. Strongin. “Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) Proteolysis of the Extracellular Loop of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels and Potential Alterations in Pain Signaling.” The Journal of Biological Chemistry 290, no. 38 (September 18, 2015): 22939–44. doi:10.1074/jbc.C115.671107.

[11] Levinson, Simon R., Songjiang Luo, and Michael A. Henry. “THE ROLE OF SODIUM CHANNELS IN CHRONIC PAIN.” Muscle & Nerve 46, no. 2 (August 2012): 155–65. doi:10.1002/mus.23314.

[12] Flinspach, M., Q. Xu, A. D. Piekarz, R. Fellows, R. Hagan, A. Gibbs, Y. Liu, et al. “Insensitivity to Pain Induced by a Potent Selective Closed-State Nav1.7 Inhibitor.” Scientific Reports 7 (January 3, 2017): 39662. doi:10.1038/srep39662.

[13] Wang, Ze-Jun, Boris Tabakoff, Simon R Levinson, and Thomas Heinbockel. “Inhibition of Nav1.7 Channels by Methyl Eugenol as a Mechanism Underlying Its Antinociceptive and Anesthetic Actions.” Acta Pharmacologica Sinica 36, no. 7 (July 2015): 791–99. doi:10.1038/aps.2015.26.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26051112

[14] Dallmeier, K., and E. A. Carlini. “Anesthetic, Hypothermic, Myorelaxant and Anticonvulsant Effects of Synthetic Eugenol Derivatives and Natural Analogues.” Pharmacology 22, no. 2 (1981): 113–27.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7208593

[15] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 29, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?FR=172.515.

[16] Humans, IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risk to. METHYLEUGENOL. International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2013. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK373178/.

[17] Tadicherla, Sujatha, and Brian Berman. “Percutaneous Dermal Drug Delivery for Local Pain Control.” Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 2, no. 1 (March 2006): 99–113.

[18] Pandey, Abhay Kumar, Pooja Singh, and Nijendra Nath Tripathi. “Chemistry and Bioactivities of Essential Oils of Some Ocimum Species: An Overview.” Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine 4, no. 9 (September 2014): 682–94. doi:10.12980/APJTB.4.2014C77.

[19] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[20] Nascimento, Simone S., Adriano A. S. Araújo, Renan G. Brito, Mairim R. Serafini, Paula P. Menezes, Josimari M. DeSantana, Waldecy Lucca, et al. “Cyclodextrin-Complexed Ocimum Basilicum Leaves Essential Oil Increases Fos Protein Expression in the Central Nervous System and Produce an Antihyperalgesic Effect in Animal Models for Fibromyalgia.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences 16, no. 1 (December 29, 2014): 547–63. doi:10.3390/ijms16010547.

[21] Venâncio, Antônio Medeiros, Alexandre Sherlley Onofre, Amintas Figueiredo Lira, Péricles Barreto Alves, Arie Fitzgerald Blank, Angelo Roberto Antoniolli, Murilo Marchioro, Charles dos Santos Estevam, and Brancilene Santos de Araujo. “Chemical Composition, Acute Toxicity, and Antinociceptive Activity of the Essential Oil of a Plant Breeding Cultivar of Basil (Ocimum Basilicum L.).” Planta Medica 77, no. 8 (May 2011): 825–29. doi:10.1055/s-0030-1250607.

[22] Singh, Varinder, Aditi Kahol, Inder Pal Singh, Isha Saraf, and Richa Shri. “Evaluation of Anti-Amnesic Effect of Extracts of Selected Ocimum Species Using in-Vitro and in-Vivo Models.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 193 (December 4, 2016): 490–99. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2016.10.026.

[23] “Essential Oils | Oxford Biosciences.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://oxfordbiosciences.com/essential-oils/.

[24] Sayyah, M., G. Saroukhani, A. Peirovi, and M. Kamalinejad. “Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Leaf Essential Oil of Laurus Nobilis Linn.” Phytotherapy Research: PTR 17, no. 7 (August 2003): 733–36. doi:10.1002/ptr.1197.

[25] Merghni, A., H. Marzouki, H. Hentati, M. Aouni, and M. Mastouri. “Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Laurus Nobilis L. Essential Oil against Staphylococcus Aureus Strains Associated with Oral Infections.” Pathologie-Biologie, December 4, 2015. doi:10.1016/j.patbio.2015.10.003.

[26] Peixoto, Larissa Rangel, Pedro Luiz Rosalen, Gabriela Lacet Silva Ferreira, Irlan Almeida Freires, Fabíola Galbiatti de Carvalho, Lúcio Roberto Castellano, and Ricardo Dias de Castro. “Antifungal Activity, Mode of Action and Anti-Biofilm Effects of Laurus Nobilis Linnaeus Essential Oil against Candida Spp.” Archives of Oral Biology 73 (January 2017): 179–85. doi:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2016.10.013.

[27] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[28] “Essential Oils | Oxford Biosciences.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://oxfordbiosciences.com/essential-oils/.

[29] Uysal, Murat, Hatice Yılmaz Doğru, Emrah Sapmaz, Ufuk Tas, Bülent Çakmak, Asker Zeki Ozsoy, Fatih Sahin, Safiye Ayan, and Mehmet Esen. “Investigating the Effect of Rose Essential Oil in Patients with Primary Dysmenorrhea.” Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice 24 (August 2016): 45–49. doi:10.1016/j.ctcp.2016.05.002.

[30] Ayan, Murat, Ufuk Tas, Erkan Sogut, Mustafa Suren, Levent Gurbuzler, and Feridun Koyuncu. “Investigating the Effect of Aromatherapy in Patients with Renal Colic.” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.) 19, no. 4 (April 2013): 329–33. doi:10.1089/acm.2011.0941.

[31] Ulusoy, Seyhan, Gülgün Boşgelmez-Tinaz, and Hale Seçilmiş-Canbay. “Tocopherol, Carotene, Phenolic Contents and Antibacterial Properties of Rose Essential Oil, Hydrosol and Absolute.” Current Microbiology 59, no. 5 (November 2009): 554–58. doi:10.1007/s00284-009-9475-y.

[32] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[33] Burns, E., C. Blamey, S. J. Ersser, A. J. Lloyd, and L. Barnetson. “The Use of Aromatherapy in Intrapartum Midwifery Practice an Observational Study.” Complementary Therapies in Nursing & Midwifery 6, no. 1 (February 2000): 33–34. doi:10.1054/ctnm.1999.0901.

[34] Ou, Ming-Chiu, Tsung-Fu Hsu, Andrew C. Lai, Yu-Ting Lin, and Chia-Ching Lin. “Pain Relief Assessment by Aromatic Essential Oil Massage on Outpatients with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial.” The Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research 38, no. 5 (May 2012): 817–22. doi:10.1111/j.1447-0756.2011.01802.x.

[35] Sienkiewicz, Monika, Anna Głowacka, Katarzyna Poznańska-Kurowska, Andrzej Kaszuba, Anna Urbaniak, and Edward Kowalczyk. “The Effect of Clary Sage Oil on Staphylococci Responsible for Wound Infections.” Postepy Dermatologii I Alergologii 32, no. 1 (February 2015): 21–26. doi:10.5114/pdia.2014.40957.

[36] Sienkiewicz, Monika, Anna Głowacka, Katarzyna Poznańska-Kurowska, Andrzej Kaszuba, Anna Urbaniak, and Edward Kowalczyk. “The Effect of Clary Sage Oil on Staphylococci Responsible for Wound Infections.” Postepy Dermatologii I Alergologii 32, no. 1 (February 2015): 21–26. doi:10.5114/pdia.2014.40957.

[37] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

[38] “Essential Oils | Oxford Biosciences.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://oxfordbiosciences.com/essential-oils/.

[39] Hasanein, Parisa, and Hassan Riahi. “Antinociceptive and Antihyperglycemic Effects of Melissa Officinalis Essential Oil in an Experimental Model of Diabetes.” Medical Principles and Practice: International Journal of the Kuwait University, Health Science Centre 24, no. 1 (2015): 47–52. doi:10.1159/000368755.

[40] Bounihi, Amina, Ghizlane Hajjaj, Rachad Alnamer, Yahia Cherrah, and Amina Zellou. “In Vivo Potential Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Melissa Officinalis L. Essential Oil.” Advances in Pharmacological Sciences 2013 (2013). doi:10.1155/2013/101759.

[41] Hăncianu, Monica, Ana Clara Aprotosoaie, Elvira Gille, Antonia Poiată, Cristina Tuchiluş, A. Spac, and Ursula Stănescu. “Chemical Composition and in Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Melissa Officinalis L. from Romania.” Revista Medico-Chirurgicala a Societatii De Medici Si Naturalisti Din Iasi 112, no. 3 (September 2008): 843–47.

[42] Schnitzler, P., A. Schuhmacher, A. Astani, and Jürgen Reichling. “Melissa Officinalis Oil Affects Infectivity of Enveloped Herpesviruses.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 15, no. 9 (September 2008): 734–40. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2008.04.018.

[43] Andrade, Milene Aparecida, Clênia Dos Santos Azevedo, Flávia Nader Motta, Maria Lucília Dos Santos, Camila Lasse Silva, Jaime Martins de Santana, and Izabela M. D. Bastos. “Essential Oils: In Vitro Activity against Leishmania Amazonensis, Cytotoxicity and Chemical Composition.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 16, no. 1 (November 8, 2016): 444. doi:10.1186/s12906-016-1401-9.

[44] Abdellatif, Fahima, Hadjira Boudjella, Abdelghani Zitouni, and Aicha Hassani. “Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil from Leaves of Algerian Melissa Officinalis L.” EXCLI Journal 13 (July 17, 2014): 772–81.

[45] “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed April 30, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

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Apr 2 17

Can These Five Remedies Take the Daily Pain Out of Lyme Disease and Co-Infections?

by Greg

For people with Lyme disease and co-infections that have severe pain due to elevated levels of Substance P in the nervous system

by Greg Lee

When I was a boy, my friends and I would bike to the local novelty store. I would buy the baseball cards and gum. One of my friends would always buy the pranks: plastic bugs, fake vomit, and the garlic flavored candy. One day, he tricked me with a chewing gum pack that had a hidden wire spring. As I took the stick of gum, it snapped on my finger. Yow!

How is chronic pain due to elevated Substance P in people with Lyme and co-infections just like getting your finger caught in a chewing gum prank?

Similar to getting your finger snapped in a chewing gum prank, people with pain syndromes have elevated levels of Substance P
Substance P is a neuropeptide which acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator[1]. It can be found throughout the body. This peptide can activate mast cells to release inflammatory compounds. It is highly correlated with levels of pain in people diagnosed with Fibromyalgia[2], chronic migraines[3], osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis[4], Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)[5], Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CPPS)[6], chronic neck pain[7], inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)[8], chronic degenerative disc disease[9], and carpal tunnel syndrome[10]. Substance P has also been indicated in patients with depression, anxiety[11], brain parasites[12], neuroinflammation[13], inflammation, hepatitis, hepatotoxicity, cholestasis, pruritus, myocarditis, bronchiolitis, abortus, bacteria and viral infections[14]. Unfortunately, Substance P may aggravate neurological problems in people with Lyme disease.

Substance P may aggravate neurological problems in people with Lyme disease
In one animal study, Substance P contributed increases in blood-brain barrier permeability, neurological damage, increased CNS infection, and elevated numbers of microglia/macrophages in mice with a Lyme disease central nervous system (CNS) infection[15]. In another lab study, Substance P aggravated the release of inflammatory compounds COX-2 and PGE(2) in mouse brain cells[16]. Another study suggests that Substance P contributes to CNS inflammation in neurological Lyme disease patients[17]. Substance P is often elevated in electrical frequency scans of Lyme patients that report chronic pain. Medications can help with reducing some Substance P symptoms.

A new type of medication called Neurokinin 1 (NK1) antagonists can help with Substance P symptoms
NK1 antagonists have helped relieve depression, anxiety, and vomiting in patients with elevated levels of Substance P[18]. By modulating serotonin and norepinephrine, they help relieve emotional symptoms. Unfortunately, most studies indicate that NK1 antagonists are not effective at relieving pain caused by elevated levels of Substance P[19]. Many patients use opioid pain relief medications which can have side effects including: constipation, nausea, and addiction.

What else can help relieve chronic pain caused by elevated levels of Substance P in people with Lyme disease?

Here are five remedies for reducing pain caused by elevated Substance P
In human, animal, and lab studies, there are five natural remedies which have pain relieving and anti-inflammatory effects in Substance P pain experiments. By processing remedies into microparticles called liposomes, has enabled remedies to be delivered more effectively into the brain[20] to counteract Substance P’s effects of increased neurological inflammation. Liposomal analgesic medications are more effective at relieving pain than their non-liposomal equivalent[21]. Liposomal remedies have also been effective at reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines in a mouse study[22]. Fortunately, liposomal encapsulation and delivery of essential oils and herbs may enhance their penetration and effectiveness against Substance P pain and neurological inflammation in Lyme patients.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #1: Peppermint Essential Oil
Peppermint essential oil was effective at inhibiting Substance P smooth muscle contraction in one animal study[23]. In a human study, peppermint oil combined with ethanol was effective at relieving headache pain[24]. Do not apply peppermint oil undiluted to the feet of children under 12 years old, avoid large doses, it may cause heartburn, perianal burning, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting when taken internally. Peppermint essential oil use is contraindicated in children under 30 months old, and people should avoid the intake of peppermint oil with gallbladder disease, severe liver damage, gallstones, chronic heartburn[25], and cases of cardiac fibrillation and in patients with a G6PD (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) deficiency[26]. Nutmeg essential oil may also help to reduce Substance P pain.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #2: Nutmeg Essential Oil
Nutmeg essential oil was effective at reducing chronic inflammatory pain through inhibition of COX-2 expression and substance P release in one rat study[27]. Maximum daily internal dose for nutmeg oil is 73 mg and 4% topically. In large doses may produce psychotropic effects[28]. Tea tree is another essential oil that may also help to relieve Substance P pain.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #3: Tea Tree Essential Oil
In a human skin and rat skin study, tea tree oil and it’s active compounds reduced Substance P induced microvascular changes, histamine, and inflammatory response[29]. In other studies, tea tree oil assists in wound healing and reduces inflammatory compounds[30]. This oil has a low risk of dermal irritation. Maximum safe dermal use is 15%. Caution: high doses, approximately a teaspoon to a half a teacup, of tea tree oil have resulted in ataxia, drowsiness, diarrhea, unconsciousness, and allergic reactions[31]. Angelica sinensis is an herb that may also help to treat pain from elevated Substance P.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #4: Angelica Sinensis Herb
In one mouse study, Angelica sinensis reduced levels of Substance P, the number of mast cells, inflammatory cytokines: Interleukin-4 (IL-4), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), as well as the expressions of nuclear factor kappa-beta (NF-κB)[32]. This herb has been used for hundreds of years in Chinese medicine for relieving pain, lubricating the intestines, and treating female irregular menstruation and amenorrhea. It has also been used extensively for treating anemia and other blood disorders by tonifying, replenishing, and invigorating blood. A literature review of this herb illustrates the wide range of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory activity, antifibrotic action, antispasmodic activity, antioxidant activities, and neuroprotective action, as well as cardio- and cerebrovascular effects[33].

Angelica is also used to treat coldness, numbness, painful joints, soreness and weakness of the low back and knees. Topically, it is used with other herbs to treat sores and abscesses, reduce swelling, expel pus, relieve pain, and heal slow-healing sores. It unblocks the bowels and is used to treat constipation and dry stools. It has also been used to treat arrhythmia, stroke, migraine, nephritis, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, liver disease, bed wetting, uterine prolapse, insomnia, blocked blood vessels in the hands and feet, herpes zoster, alopecia, psoriasis, dermatological disorders, deafness, anal fissure, chronic hypertropic rhinitis, and chronic pharyngitis[34].

Herb – drug interaction: It is suggested that concurrent use of Angelica with wafarin may potentiate the effects of wafarin, anti-platelet, and anticoagulant drugs. This herb reduces scopolamine and cycloheximide induced amnesia in rats. Angelica also treats acetaminophen-induced liver damage[35]. Another herb called Dragon’s blood may also help to relieve pain from elevated Substance P.

Pain Relieving, Anti-Substance P Remedy #5: Dragon’s Blood Herb
This herb has been used for thousands of years for treating various pains for due to its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. In one study on rat neurons, this herb demonstrated anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects by blocking the synthesis and release of substance P through inhibition of COX-2 protein induction and intracellular calcium ion concentration[36]. In another animal study, Dragon’s Blood active compounds had a synergistic effect on relieving pain in spinal nerve cells[37]. A combination of herb and essential remedies may help with reducing chronic pain caused by elevated levels of Substance P in people with Lyme disease.

These five remedies may help to reduce chronic pain caused by too much Substance P
People with neurological Lyme disease that also have chronic pain may have elevated levels of Substance P. Similar to not getting your finger snapped in a chewing gum prank, a combination of herbal and essential oil remedies may help to reduce the levels of Substance P, inflammatory cytokines, and chronic pain. These remedies may also help with protecting the brain and nervous system against the damaging and inflammatory effects of Substance P. Processing these herbs and essential oils into microparticle remedies, called liposomes, may enhance their ability to penetrate the blood brain barrier, lower levels of Substance P in the central nervous system, and relieve chronic brain and body pain. Since liposomal remedies requires special knowledge and equipment, work with a Lyme / liposomal literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a customized, safe, and effective treatment plan for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday April 3rd at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Lyme disease chronic pain, co-infections, and inflammation symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to reduce Lyme disease and co-infection chronic pain from elevated levels of Substance P? Tell us about it.


1 “Substance P.” Wikipedia, February 28, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php
2 Lyon, Pamela, Milton Cohen, and John Quintner. “An Evolutionary Stress-Response Hypothesis for Chronic Widespread Pain (Fibromyalgia Syndrome).” Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.) 12, no. 8 (August 2011): 1167–78. doi:10.1111/j.1526-4637.2011.01168.x. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21692974
3 Jang, M.-U., J.-W. Park, H.-S. Kho, S.-C. Chung, and J.-W. Chung. “Plasma and Saliva Levels of Nerve Growth Factor and Neuropeptides in Chronic Migraine Patients.” Oral Diseases 17, no. 2 (March 2011): 187–93. doi:10.1111/j.1601-0825.2010.01717.x.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20659258
4 Lisowska, Barbara, Aleksander Lisowski, and Katarzyna Siewruk. “Substance P and Chronic Pain in Patients with Chronic Inflammation of Connective Tissue.” PloS One 10, no. 10 (2015): e0139206. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0139206.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4622041/
5 Wei, Tzuping, Tian-Zhi Guo, Wen-Wu Li, Saiyun Hou, Wade S. Kingery, and John David Clark. “Keratinocyte Expression of Inflammatory Mediators Plays a Crucial Role in Substance P-Induced Acute and Chronic Pain.” Journal of Neuroinflammation 9 (July 23,
2012): 181. doi:10.1186/1742-2094-9-181.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3458986/
6 Ma, Yong, Zu-Long Wang, Zi-Xue Sun, Bo Men, and Bao-Qing Shen. “[Common TCM syndrome pattern of chronic pelvic pain syndrome relates to plasma substance p and beta endorphin].” Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue = National Journal of Andrology 20, no. 4 (April 2014): 363–66. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24873166
7 Karlsson, L., B. Gerdle, B. Ghafouri, E. Bäckryd, P. Olausson, N. Ghafouri, and B. Larsson. “Intramuscular Pain Modulatory Substances before and after Exercise in Women with Chronic Neck Pain.” European Journal of Pain (London, England) 19, no. 8 (September 2015): 1075–85. doi:10.1002/ejp.630.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430591
8 Jarcho, Johanna M., Natasha A. Feier, Alberto Bert, Jennifer A. Labus, Maunoo Lee, Jean Stains, Bahar Ebrat, et al. “Diminished Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Patients with Two Forms of Chronic Visceral Pain.” Pain 154, no. 7 (July 2013): 987–96.
doi:10.1016/j.pain.2013.02.026. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23582152
9 Schroeder, Malte, Lennart Viezens, Christian Schaefer, Barbara Friedrichs, Petra Algenstaedt, Wolfgang Rüther, Lothar Wiesner, and Nils Hansen-Algenstaedt. “Chemokine Profile of Disc Degeneration with Acute or Chronic Pain.” Journal of Neurosurgery. Spine 18, no. 5 (May 2013): 496–503. doi:10.3171/2013.1.SPINE12483.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23473344
10 Öztürk, Niyazi, Nuray Erin, and Serdar Tüzüner. “Changes in Tissue Substance P Levels in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.” Neurosurgery 67, no. 6 (December 2010): 1655-1660; discussion 1660-1661. doi:10.1227/NEU.0b013e3181fa7032.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21107196
11 Schwarz, Markus J., and Manfred Ackenheil. “The Role of Substance P in Depression: Therapeutic Implications.” Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience 4, no. 1 (March 2002): 21–29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181667/
12 Robinson, Prema, Armandina Garza, Joel Weinstock, Jose A. Serpa, Jerry Clay Goodman, Kristian T. Eckols, Bahrom Firozgary, and David J. Tweardy. “Substance P Causes Seizures in Neurocysticercosis.” PLoS Pathogens 8, no. 2 (February 2012):
e1002489. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002489.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22346746
13 Johnson, M. Brittany, Ada D. Young, and Ian Marriott. “The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders.” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 10 (2016): 296. doi:10.3389/fncel.2016.00296.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28101005
14 Muñoz, Miguel, and Rafael Coveñas. “Involvement of Substance P and the NK-1 Receptor in Human Pathology.” Amino Acids 46, no. 7 (July 2014): 1727–50. doi:10.1007/s00726-014-1736-9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24705689
15 Johnson, M. Brittany, Ada D. Young, and Ian Marriott. “The Therapeutic Potential of Targeting Substance P/NK-1R Interactions in Inflammatory CNS Disorders.” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience 10 (2016): 296. doi:10.3389/fncel.2016.00296.
http://journal.frontiersin.org/…/fncel.2016.00296/full
16 Rasley, Amy, Ian Marriott, Craig R. Halberstadt, Kenneth L. Bost, and Juan Anguita. “Substance P Augments Borrelia Burgdorferi-Induced Prostaglandin E2 Production by Murine Microglia.” Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950) 172, no. 9 (May 1,
2004): 5707–13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15100316
17 Martinez, Alejandra N., Geeta Ramesh, Mary B. Jacobs, and Mario T. Philipp. “Antagonist of the Neurokinin-1 Receptor Curbs Neuroinflammation in Ex Vivo and in Vitro Models of Lyme Neuroborreliosis.” Journal of Neuroinflammation 12 (December 30,
2015): 243. doi:10.1186/s12974-015-0453-y.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26714480
18 Schwarz, Markus J., and Manfred Ackenheil. “The Role of Substance P in Depression: Therapeutic Implications.” Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience 4, no. 1 (March 2002): 21–29. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181667/
19 Diemunsch, P., G. P. Joshi, and J.-F. Brichant. “Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists in the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.” BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia 103, no. 1 (July 1, 2009): 7–13. doi:10.1093/bja/aep125.
https://academic.oup.com/bja/article/103/1/7/459585/Neurokinin-1-receptor-antagonistsin-the
20 De Luca, Maria Antonietta, Francesco Lai, Francesco Corrias, Pierluigi Caboni, Zisis Bimpisidis, Elias Maccioni, Anna Maria Fadda, and Gaetano Di Chiara. “Lactoferrin- and Antitransferrin-Modified Liposomes for Brain Targeting of the NK3 Receptor Agonist
Senktide: Preparation and in Vivo Evaluation.” International Journal of Pharmaceutics 479, no. 1 (February 1, 2015): 129–37. doi:10.1016/j.ijpharm.2014.12.057.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25560308
21 Franz-Montan, Michelle, André L. R. Silva, Karina Cogo, Cristiane de C. Bergamaschi, Maria C. Volpato, José Ranali, Eneida de Paula, and Francisco C. Groppo. “Liposome-Encapsulated Ropivacaine for Topical Anesthesia of Human Oral Mucosa.” Anesthesia and Analgesia 104, no. 6 (June 2007): 1528–1531, table of contents. doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000262040.19721.26.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17513653
22 Thamphiwatana, Soracha, Weiwei Gao, Marygorret Obonyo, and Liangfang Zhang. “In Vivo Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection with Liposomal Linolenic Acid Reduces Colonization and Ameliorates Inflammation.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111, no. 49 (December 9, 2014):
17600–605. doi:10.1073/pnas.1418230111.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25422427
23 Hills, J. M., and P. I. Aaronson. “The Mechanism of Action of Peppermint Oil on Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle. An Analysis Using Patch Clamp Electrophysiology and Isolated Tissue Pharmacology in Rabbit and Guinea Pig.” Gastroenterology 101, no. 1 (July 1991): 55–65. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1646142
24 Göbel, H., G. Schmidt, M. Dworschak, H. Stolze, and D. Heuss. “Essential Plant Oils and Headache Mechanisms.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 2, no. 2 (October 1995): 93–102. doi:10.1016/S0944-7113(11)80053-X.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/…/pii/S094471131180053X
25 “Peppermint Safety Info | National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy.” Accessed April 1, 2017. http://naha.org/naha-blog/peppermint-safety-info/.
26 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013. https://www.amazon.com/Essential-Oil-Safety…/dp/0443062412
27 Zhang, Wei Kevin, Shan-Shan Tao, Ting-Ting Li, Yu-Sang Li, Xiao-Jun Li, He-Bin Tang, Ren-Huai Cong, Fang-Li Ma, and Chu-Jun Wan. “Nutmeg Oil Alleviates Chronic Inflammatory Pain through Inhibition of COX-2 Expression and Substance P Release in Vivo.” Food & Nutrition Research 60 (April 26, 2016). doi:10.3402/fnr.v60.30849.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4848392/
28 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013.
29 Khalil, Zeinab, Annette L. Pearce, Narmatha Satkunanathan, Emma Storer, John J. Finlay-Jones, and Prue H. Hart. “Regulation of Wheal and Flare by Tea Tree Oil: Complementary Human and Rodent Studies.” The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 123, no. 4 (October 2004): 683–90. doi:10.1111/j.0022-202X.2004.23407.x.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15373773
30 Khalil, Zeinab, Annette L. Pearce, Narmatha Satkunanathan, Emma Storer, John J. Finlay-Jones, and Prue H. Hart. “Regulation of Wheal and Flare by Tea Tree Oil: Complementary Human and Rodent Studies.” The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 123, no. 4 (October 2004): 683–90. doi:10.1111/j.0022-202X.2004.23407.x.
http://www.jidonline.org/…/S0022-202X(15)30988-X/abstract
31 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013.
32 Lee, Jaehong, You Yeon Choi, Mi Hye Kim, Jae Min Han, Ji Eun Lee, Eun Hye Kim, Jongki Hong, Jinju Kim, and Woong Mo Yang. “Topical Application of Angelica Sinensis Improves Pruritus and Skin Inflammation in Mice with Atopic Dermatitis-Like Symptoms.” Journal of Medicinal Food 19, no. 1 (January 2016): 98–105. doi:10.1089/jmf.2015.3489.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26305727
33 Wei, Wen-Long, Rui Zeng, Cai-Mei Gu, Yan Qu, and Lin-Fang Huang. “Angelica Sinensis in China-A Review of Botanical Profile, Ethnopharmacology, Phytochemistry and Chemical Analysis.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 190 (August 22, 2016): 116–41. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2016.05.023. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27211015
34 Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and
Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., pp. 918 – 924.
35 Chen, John K., and Tina T. Chen. 2004. Chinese Medical Herbology and
Pharmacology. City of Industry CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., pp. 918 – 924.
36 Li, Yu-Sang, Jun-Xian Wang, Mei-Mei Jia, Min Liu, Xiao-Jun Li, and He-Bin Tang. “Dragon’s Blood Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Responses by Blocking the Synthesis and Release of Substance P in Rats.” Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 118, no. 1 (2012): 43–54.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22198006
37 Guo, Min, Su Chen, and Xiangming Liu. “Material Basis for Inhibition of Dragon’s Blood on Evoked Discharges of Wide Dynamic Range Neurons in Spinal Dorsal Horn of Rats.” Science in China. Series C, Life Sciences 51, no. 11 (November 2008): 1025–38. doi:10.1007/s11427-008-0133-6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18989646


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Mar 4 17

Five Treatments for Stopping Runaway Mast Cell Inflammation Caused by Lyme, Parasites, and Mold

by Greg


For people with severe allergies and swollen tissues who have been diagnosed with Lyme, mold, or parasitic infections
by Greg Lee

Have you ever washed a car with a giggly little girl? One warm day, my daughter and I got out the big sponges and soaped up the car. She did the lower half and I did the upper. Her giggly side came out when she got to rinse off the car. Small girl + hose + giggles = spray daddy! She chased me around the car laughing and spraying me from top to bottom. I’m sure I got rinsed more than the car

How is being drenched by a little kid with a hose similar to excess mast cell inflammation caused by an underlying Lyme disease, parasitic, or mold infection?

Similar to being totally soaked by a giggly little girl and a garden hose, many infections can trigger a flood of excess mast cell inflammation
Multiple infections can trigger mast cells to release a large amount of inflammatory compounds. In animal studies, Lyme disease1, parasitic helminths, nematodes, protozoa including Malaria, mold including Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae, bacterial infections including Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, group A streptococcal (GAS) skin infection, and E. coli peritoneal and urinary infections, Haemophilus influenzae otitis media; and polymicrobial intra-abdominal sepsis can trigger mast cells to quickly release inflammatory compounds2. In human and animal studies, viral infections including Dengue3, H1N54, Herpes5, and respiratory syncytial virus6 are also capable of triggering the release of mast cell inflammation. Mast cells are an initial line of defense against invading pathogens.

Mast cells inflammation is a normal immune system response to invading pathogens
Mast cells are white blood cells that have the ability to trigger the release of infection fighting inflammatory compounds upon invading germs. These cells are are found in most tissues of the body. Immature mast cells circulate through the blood and implant in tissues with a vascular blood supply. They are particularly concentrated in the tissues exposed to the outside environment: skin, airways and intestines, which are perfect for detecting an incoming invader. These cells are also effective at keeping many infections in check.

Mast cells may also help to suppress certain infections
In mouse experiments, mast cells mediate the expulsion of parasite worms: Trichinella spiralis and Strongyloides. Moreover, mast cell–deficient mice develop larger number of parasites and larger lesions in a Leishmania major infection7. Mast cells decrease the uptake and growth of pulmonary tularemia in macrophages in another mouse study8. Unfortunately in chronic infection patients, mast cells can be hyper-activated which results in the over-production of inflammatory compounds.

Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is defined as the excess over production of mast cell inflammation
Mast cell activation syndrome has been known to produce a wide range of chronic symptoms in patients with mold exposure9, Lyme disease10, recurrent infections and low antibody levels, specifically in immunoglobulin (Ig) types IgG, IgM and IgA. Symptoms often include new infections, chronic lung disease, and inflammation and infection of the gastrointestinal tract11, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS)12. Different systems in the body may present with these MCAS symptoms13 including:

  • Dermatological: flushing, easy bruising, either a reddish or a pale complexion, itchiness
  • Cardiovascular: lightheadedness, dizziness, presyncope, syncope
  • Gastrointestinal: diarrhea, cramping, intestinal discomfort, nausea, vomiting, small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
  • Swallowing, throat tightness
  • Psychological & Neurological: brain fog, short term memory dysfunction, difficulty with recalling words, headaches, migraines
  • Respiratory: congestion, coughing, wheezing
  • Vision/Eyes: ocular discomfort, conjunctivitis
  • Constitutional: general fatigue and malaise, food, drug, and chemical intolerances especially fragrances, sense of being cold all the time
  • Musculoskeletal: osteoporosis and osteopenia including young patients
  • Rapid weight gain, obesity, diabetes
  • Anaphylaxis especially if too many inflammatory compounds are dumped suddenly into a patient’s system, difficulty breathing, itchy hives, flushing or pale skin, feeling of warmth, weak and rapid pulse, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness and fainting

Symptoms can be caused by or worsened by triggers, which vary widely and are patient-specific. Common triggers include: alcohol, and high-histamine content foods, temperature extremes, airborne smells including perfumes or smoke, exercise or exertion, emotional stress, hormonal changes – particularly during adolescence, pregnancy and women’s menstrual cycles. These symptoms are thought to be caused be genetic issues and are therefore incurable. Since mast cells are widespread throughout the body, symptoms can also occur in virtually all organs and tissues. Moreover, symptoms can flare up from time to time, waxing and waning over years to decades14. Specific inflammatory markers have been found in MCAS patients.

Specific inflammatory compounds have been identified in mast cell activation patients
Many different inflammatory compounds can be produced and released by mast cells. These compounds have been identified as markers in patients with MCAS: Beta-Tryptase15, histamine, heparin, proteases and cytokines such as Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α), arachidonic acid metabolites PGD2 and LTC416, and a number of other cytokines/growth factors and chemokines including Interleukin-5 (IL-5), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-13 (IL-13), Interleukin-16 (IL-16), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), nerve growth factor (NGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as several C-C chemokines17. Medications can help with managing MCAS symptoms.

Medications can help with reducing inflammatory compounds from mast cell activation
There have not been any therapeutic trials of medications for MCAS. Medications that have been effective have been used in animal studies, individuals, or small group human case studies. Due to the wide variance in patient symptoms, triggers, genetic and epigenetic factors, highly individualized treatment is necessary18. Anti-allergy drugs reduced mast cell inflammation in mice19, antihistamine drugs, immunosuppresive medications, kinase inhibitors, chemotherapy drugs, and in rare cases stem cell therapy have had varying success in reducing symptoms in MCAS patients20.

What else can help you to reduce runaway inflammation caused by mast cell activation?

Here are five treatments for reducing excess mast cell inflammation
Inhibiting mast cell inflammation production may help to stop chronic MCAS. Formulating remedies into microparticles called liposomes has been effective at mediating mast cell activation21. Liposomal remedies have also been effective at reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α22 in a mouse study. Liposomal remedies also have been shown to penetrate deeper into host cells23 and into pathogens24 than their non-liposomal counterparts. Fortunately, liposomal encapsulation and delivery of essential oils, herbs, and supplements may increase their penetration and effectiveness against mast cell activation syndrome inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #1: Essential Oils
Lavender oil inhibits mast cell inflammation in mice and rats and TNF-α production25. A 2:1 combination of essential oils of Lavender and Thyme reduced mast cell degranulation and inflammation when applied for twenty-one days in a mouse study26. German chamomile oil was highly effective at inhibiting mast cell degranulation in a lab study27 and a rat study28. Geranium essential oil inhibited cultured mast cell degranulation in another rat study29. Not only essential oils, but also herbs have been effective at inhibiting mast cell inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #2: Herbs
Compounds in salvia miltiorrhiza root, Chinese name Dan Shen, blunt mast cell degranulation in a lab study30. Sanguisorbia root, Chinese name: Di Yu, inhibited mast cell degranulation, Interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and TNF-α production in a lab study31. Houttuynia, Chinese name: Yu Xing Cao, blocked the mast cell inflammatory production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8 and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kB) in a lab experiment32. Magnolia flower, Chinese name: Xin Yi Hua, has been effective in inhibiting mast cell histamine release33. Agaricus mushroom, Chinese name: Ji Song Rong, inhibits the mast cell anaphylactic shock reaction in a rat study34. Supplements can also help with mast cell inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #3: Natural supplements
Curcumin, the main compound in turmeric, inhibits the release of inflammation from mast cells35. Alpha lipoic acid decreased mast cell histamine release and the anaphylactic shock reaction in a lab study36. Quercetin has also been effective in blocking the release of mast cell histamine and inflammatory cytokines Il-8, TNF, and NF-kB37. Theanine inhibited the mast cell production of histamines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 secretion by suppressing NF-κB activation in a lab study38. In addition to supplements, electro-acupuncture has shown to be effective at reducing mast cell inflammation.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #4: Electro-acupuncture
In one rat study, electro-acupuncture on acupoint Stomach-25 inhibited the activation of Substance-P and VIP in mast cells39. Frequency Specific Microcurrent can also help with reducing histamine and inflammatory compounds.

Reducing Mast Cell Inflammation Treatment #5: Frequency Specific Microcurrent
Frequency Specific Microcurrent uses very low level electrical currents to reduce histamines, inflammatory compounds, and bacterial, fungal and parasitic infections and toxins40. These currents are combined with a second set of frequencies to target inflamed or toxic areas. As a result, allergic symptoms and inflamed areas can be dramatically reduced. A combination of remedies and treatments can help with reducing mast cell activation symptoms.

These five treatments may help to reduce excess histamines and inflammation from mast cell activation syndrome
People with Lyme disease, mold or parasites that have allergic sensitivity due to excess histamines, way too much inflammation, and symptoms that are not improving with Lyme medications may have a condition called mast cell activation syndrome. Just like redirecting a girl to rinse the car instead of soaking her dad, remedies and treatments may help to reduce the overproduction of histamine, inflammatory cytokines and persistent symptoms of mast cell activation. Processing herbs, essential oils, and supplements into microparticle remedies, called liposomes, may help them to be more effective at reducing mast cell inflammation symptoms. Since liposomal remedies requires special knowledge and equipment, work with a Lyme / liposomal literate natural remedy practitioner to develop a customized, safe, and effective treatment plan for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday March 6th at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Lyme disease, co-infection, and mast cell inflammation symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to reduce allergic reactions and inflammation due to Lyme induced mast cell activation? Tell us about it.


1 Talkington, Jeffrey, and Steven P. Nickell. “Borrelia Burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release.” Infection and Immunity 67, no. 3 (March 1999): 1107–15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC96436/
2 Urb, Mirjam, and Donald C. Sheppard. “The Role of Mast Cells in the Defence against Pathogens.” PLOS Pathogens 8, no. 4 (April 26, 2012): e1002619. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002619.
http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article? id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1002619
3 Chu, Ya-Ting, Shu-Wen Wan, Robert Anderson, and Yee-Shin Lin. “Mast Cell-Macrophage Dynamics in Modulation of Dengue Virus Infection in Skin.” Immunology 146, no. 1 (September 2015): 163–72. doi:10.1111/imm.12492. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26059780
4 Hu, Yanxin, Yi Jin, Deping Han, Guozhong Zhang, Shanping Cao, Jingjing Xie, Jia Xue, et al. “Mast Cell-Induced Lung Injury in Mice Infected with H5N1 Influenza Virus.” Journal of Virology 86, no. 6 (March 2012): 3347–56. doi:10.1128/JVI.06053-11.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22238293
5 Larocca, R. D. “Eosinophilic Conjunctivitis, Herpes Virus and Mast Cell Tumor of the Third Eyelid in a Cat.” Veterinary Ophthalmology 3, no. 4 (2000): 221–25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11397307
6 Shirato, Kazuya, and Fumihiro Taguchi. “Mast Cell Degranulation Is Induced by A549 Airway Epithelial Cell Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus.” Virology 386, no. 1 (March 30, 2009): 88–93. doi:10.1016/j.virol.2009.01.011.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19195674
7 Urb, Mirjam, and Donald C. Sheppard. “The Role of Mast Cells in the Defence against Pathogens.” PLOS Pathogens 8, no. 4 (April 26, 2012): e1002619. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002619.
http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article…
8 Ketavarapu, Jyothi M., Annette R. Rodriguez, Jieh-Juen Yu, Yu Cong, Ashlesh K. Murthy, Thomas G. Forsthuber, M. Neal Guentzel, Karl E. Klose, Michael T. Berton, and Bernard P. Arulanandam. “Mast Cells Inhibit Intramacrophage Francisella Tularensis
Replication via Contact and Secreted Products Including IL-4.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105, no. 27 (July 8, 2008): 9313–18. doi:10.1073/pnas.0707636105.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18591675
9 Theoharides, Theoharis C., Julia M. Stewart, Erifili Hatziagelaki, and Gerasimos Kolaitis. “Brain ‘fog,’ Inflammation and Obesity: Key Aspects of Neuropsychiatric Disorders Improved by Luteolin.” Frontiers in Neuroscience 9 (July 3, 2015). doi:10.3389/fnins.2015.00225. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4490655/
10 Talkington, Jeffrey, and Steven P. Nickell. “Borrelia Burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release.” Infection and Immunity 67, no. 3 (March 1999): 1107–15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC96436/
11 “Common Variable Immunodeficiency.” Wikipedia, September 25, 2016. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php title=Common_variable_immunodeficiency&oldid=741130072. https://en.wikipedia.org/…/Common_variable…
12 “Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.” Wikipedia, November 25, 2016.
https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php? title=Mast_cell_activation_syndrome&oldid=751436907.
13 “Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.” Wikipedia, November 25, 2016.
https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php…. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mast_cell_activation_syndrome
14 Molderings, Gerhard J, Stefan Brettner, Jürgen Homann, and Lawrence B Afrin. “Mast Cell Activation Disease: A Concise Practical Guide for Diagnostic Workup and Therapeutic Options.” Journal of Hematology & Oncology 4 (March 22, 2011): 10. doi:10.1186/1756-8722-4-10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3069946/
15 Payne, V., and P. C. A. Kam. “Mast Cell Tryptase: A Review of Its Physiology and Clinical Significance.” Anaesthesia 59, no. 7 (July 2004): 695–703. doi:10.1111/j.1365- 2044.2004.03757.x. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15200544
16 Akin, Cem, Peter Valent, and Dean D. Metcalfe. “Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: Proposed Diagnostic Criteria.” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 126, no. 6 (December 2010): 1099–104.e4. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2010.08.035.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3753019/
17 Metcalfe, Dean D. “Mast Cells and Mastocytosis.” Blood 112, no. 4 (August 15, 2008): 946–56. doi:10.1182/blood-2007-11-078097.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2515131/
18 Molderings, Gerhard J., Britta Haenisch, Stefan Brettner, Jürgen Homann, Markus Menzen, Franz Ludwig Dumoulin, Jens Panse, Joseph Butterfield, and Lawrence B. Afrin. “Pharmacological Treatment Options for Mast Cell Activation Disease.” Naunyn-
Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology 389 (2016): 671–94. doi:10.1007/s00210-016-1247-1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903110/
19 Wang, Jing, and Guo-Ping Shi. “Mast Cell Stabilization: Novel Medication for Obesity and Diabetes.” Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews 27, no. 8 (November 2011): 919–24. doi:10.1002/dmrr.1272.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3318912/
20 Molderings, Gerhard J., Britta Haenisch, Stefan Brettner, Jürgen Homann, Markus Menzen, Franz Ludwig Dumoulin, Jens Panse, Joseph Butterfield, and Lawrence B. Afrin. “Pharmacological Treatment Options for Mast Cell Activation Disease.” Naunyn-
Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology 389 (2016): 671–94. doi:10.1007/s00210-016-1247-1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903110/
21 Inoh, Yoshikazu, Satoshi Tadokoro, Hiroki Tanabe, Makoto Inoue, Naohide Hirashima, Mamoru Nakanishi, and Tadahide Furuno. “Inhibitory Effects of a Cationic Liposome on Allergic Reaction Mediated by Mast Cell Activation.” Biochemical
Pharmacology, 2013. http://agris.fao.org/agrissearch/
search.do?recordID=US201500023163. http://agris.fao.org/agrissearch/search.do…
22 Thamphiwatana, Soracha, Weiwei Gao, Marygorret Obonyo, and Liangfang Zhang. “In Vivo Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection with Liposomal Linolenic Acid Reduces Colonization and Ameliorates Inflammation.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111, no. 49 (December 9, 2014):
17600–605. doi:10.1073/pnas.1418230111.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25422427
23 Deno, Sho, Naohiro Takemoto, and Hiroo Iwata. “Introduction of Antioxidant-Loaded Liposomes into Endothelial Cell Surfaces through DNA Hybridization.” Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 22, no. 1 (January 1, 2014): 350–57. doi:10.1016/j.bmc.2013.11.023. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24345482
24 Mugabe, Clement, Majed Halwani, Ali O. Azghani, Robert M. Lafrenie, and Abdelwahab Omri. “Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.” Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 50, no. 6 (June 1, 2006): 2016–22. doi:10.1128/AAC.01547-
05. http://aac.asm.org/content/50/6/2016.full
25 Kim, H. M., and S. H. Cho. “Lavender Oil Inhibits Immediate-Type Allergic Reaction in Mice and Rats.” The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 51, no. 2 (February 1999): 221–26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10217323
26 Seo, Young Mi, and Seok Hee Jeong. “[Effects of Blending Oil of Lavender and Thyme on Oxidative Stress, Immunity, and Skin Condition in Atopic Dermatitis Induced Mice].” Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing 45, no. 3 (June 2015): 367–77. doi:10.4040/jkan.2015.45.3.367.
https://synapse.koreamed.org/DOIx.php…
27 Mitoshi, Mai, Isoko Kuriyama, Hiroto Nakayama, Hironari Miyazato, Keiichiro Sugimoto, Yuko Kobayashi, Tomoko Jippo, Kazuki Kanazawa, Hiromi Yoshida, and Yoshiyuki Mizushina. “Effects of Essential Oils from Herbal Plants and Citrus Fruits on DNA Polymerase Inhibitory, Cancer Cell Growth Inhibitory, Antiallergic, and Antioxidant Activities.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 60, no. 45 (November 14, 2012): 11343–50. doi:10.1021/jf303377f. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23088772
28 Miller, T., U. Wittstock, U. Lindequist, and E. Teuscher. “Effects of Some Components of the Essential Oil of Chamomile, Chamomilla Recutita, on Histamine Release from Rat Mast Cells.” Planta Medica 62, no. 1 (February 1996): 60–61. doi:10.1055/s-2006-
957799. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8720389
29 Kobayashi, Yuko, Harumi Sato, Mika Yorita, Hiroto Nakayama, Hironari Miyazato, Keiichiro Sugimoto, and Tomoko Jippo. “Inhibitory Effects of Geranium Essential Oil and Its Major Component, Citronellol, on Degranulation and Cytokine Production by Mast
Cells.” Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry 80, no. 6 (June 2016): 1172–78. doi:10.1080/09168451.2016.1148573. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26927807
30 Han, Jing-Yan, Jing-Yu Fan, Yoshinori Horie, Soichiro Miura, De-Hua Cui, Hiromasa Ishii, Toshifumi Hibi, Hiroshi Tsuneki, and Ikuko Kimura. “Ameliorating Effects of Compounds Derived from Salvia Miltiorrhiza Root Extract on Microcirculatory Disturbance and Target Organ Injury by Ischemia and Reperfusion.” Pharmacology &
Therapeutics 117, no. 2 (February 2008): 280–95.
doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.09.008. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18048101
31 Yang, Ju-Hye, Jae-Myung Yoo, Won-Kyung Cho, and Jin Yeul Ma. “Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Sanguisorbae Radix Water Extract on the Suppression of Mast Cell Degranulation and STAT-1/Jak-2 Activation in BMMCs and HaCaT Keratinocytes.” BMC
Complementary and Alternative Medicine 16 (September 6, 2016): 347. doi:10.1186/s12906-016-1317-4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27599590
32 Lee, Hee Joe, Hye-Sook Seo, Gyung-Jun Kim, Chan Yong Jeon, Jong Hyeong Park, Bo-Hyoung Jang, Sun-Ju Park, Yong-Cheol Shin, and Seong-Gyu Ko. “Houttuynia Cordata Thunb Inhibits the Production of pro-Inflammatory Cytokines through Inhibition
of the NFκB Signaling Pathway in HMC-1 Human Mast Cells.” Molecular Medicine Reports 8, no. 3 (September 2013): 731–36. doi:10.3892/mmr.2013.1585.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23846481
33 Shen, Y., E. C. K. Pang, C. C. L. Xue, Z. Z. Zhao, J. G. Lin, and C. G. Li. “Inhibitions of Mast Cell-Derived Histamine Release by Different Flos Magnoliae Species in Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells.” Phytomedicine: International Journal of Phytotherapy and Phytopharmacology 15, no. 10 (October 2008): 808–14. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2008.04.012. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18585022
34 Choi, Yun Ho, Guang Hai Yan, Ok Hee Chai, Yung Hyun Choi, Xin Zhang, Jung Min Lim, Ji-Hyun Kim, et al. “Inhibitory Effects of Agaricus Blazei on Mast Cell-Mediated Anaphylaxis-like Reactions.” Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 29, no. 7 (July 2006):
1366–71.
35 Kurup, Viswanath P., and Christy S. Barrios. “Immunomodulatory Effects of Curcumin in Allergy.” Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 52, no. 9 (September 2008): 1031–39. doi:10.1002/mnfr.200700293. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398870
36 Choi, Yun Ho, Ok Hee Chai, Eui-Hyeog Han, Su-Young Choi, Hyoung Tae Kim, and Chang Ho Song. “Lipoic Acid Suppresses Compound 48/80-Induced Anaphylaxis-like Reaction.” Anatomy & Cell Biology 43, no. 4 (December 2010): 317–24. doi:10.5115/acb.2010.43.4.317.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3026184/
37 Weng, Zuyi, Bodi Zhang, Shahrzad Asadi, Nikolaos Sismanopoulos, Alan Butcher, Xueyan Fu, Alexandra Katsarou-Katsari, Christina Antoniou, and Theoharis C. Theoharides. “Quercetin Is More Effective than Cromolyn in Blocking Human Mast Cell Cytokine Release and Inhibits Contact Dermatitis and Photosensitivity in Humans.” PLOS ONE 7, no. 3 (March 28, 2012): e33805. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0033805.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22470478
38 Kim, N. H., H. J. Jeong, and H. M. Kim. “Theanine Is a Candidate Amino Acid for Pharmacological Stabilization of Mast Cells.” Amino Acids 42, no. 5 (May 2012): 1609– 18. doi:10.1007/s00726-011-0847-9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21344174
39 Wu, Huan-Gan, Bin Jiang, En-Hua Zhou, Zheng Shi, Da-Ren Shi, Yun-Hua Cui, Suo-Tang Kou, and Hui-Rong Liu. “Regulatory Mechanism of Electroacupuncture in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Preventing MC Activation and Decreasing SP VIP Secretion.”
Digestive Diseases and Sciences 53, no. 6 (June 2008): 1644–51. doi:10.1007/s10620-007-0062-4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17999187
40 DC, Carolyn McMakin MA. Frequency Specific Microcurrent in Pain Management, 1e. 1 Pap/Dvdr edition. Edinburgh ; New York: Churchill Livingstone, 2011.

DISCLAIMER:-

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-practitioner relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

Jan 3 17

Two Frogs Has Moved to a New Office as of January 1st!

by Greg

moving_van

Two Frogs has moved into a larger office!

We are open at our new location inside the:

Frederick Innovative Technology Center (FITCI) at
4539 Metropolitan Court
Frederick, MD 21704

fitci_front

 

There are multiple visitor spaces (highlighted in yellow) across from the front entrance of the FITCI.
If all the visitor spaces are taken, you can park in any open parking space.

 

fitci_above

Here is what the lobby looks like:

fitci_lobby

Have a seat in the waiting area.

Tell the receptionist you are here to see Greg Lee.
Restrooms are right behind the reception desk.
Water is available upon request.

Question? Call us at 301-228-3764 or email at TwoFrogsHealingCenter@gmail.com.
We look forward to seeing you in our new space!

Thanks,

Greg

Oct 19 16

How These Essential Oils Help People with Lyme Disease to Fight Drug Resistant Candida

by Greg

english_ivy

For people receiving antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease that have impaired brain function, fatigue, and intestinal bloating due to a drug-resistant Candida infection
by Greg Lee

While clearing space for a new flower garden, I found a tangled mass of vines. English ivy had overgrown a large area. Pulling up one vine unearthed four more. After thirty minutes of pulling and digging, most of the vines were cleaned up.

How is a tangled mass of ivy similar to a person with Lyme disease that is fighting a Candida infection?

Just like a bed of fast growing ivy, Candida can quickly spread in patients receiving antibiotics for Lyme disease
There are over twenty species of Candida that can infect humans1. Candida is a yeast that can be ingested on contaminated food. Candida can normally be found along with healthy microbes in the digestion tract. Both exposure to environmental mold which suppresses the immune system and excess consumption of alcohol, sugar, and carbohydrates can increase the growth of Candida. People who have chronic medical conditions, like Lyme disease, are a greater risk of a systemic Candida infection2. Antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease, can kill off healthy gut microbes, which can create more areas in the intestines for Candida to spread into. In some cases, antibiotic therapy in Lyme patients may be combined with steroid3 or immuno-suppressive4 treatment. Studies have shown that people undergoing antibiotic, steroid, or immuno-suppressive treatment are more at risk of a Candida infection5. A chronic Lyme infection can also suppress the immune system, which may also enable Candida to spread deeper6. A systemic Candida infection can mimic the symptoms of Lyme disease.

There is a significant overlap between symptoms of a systemic Candida and Lyme disease infection
A systemic Candida infection can produce similar symptoms as found in patients with Lyme disease. Symptoms which overlap are:

  • Fever and chills7
  • Chronic fatigue8
  • Digestion pain, bloating, and nausea9
  • Meningitis10
  • Headache11
  • Arthritis12
  • Heart arrhythmia13
  • Cognitive decline and memory recall problems14
  • ADHD15
  • Depression16
  • Urinary tract infections17
  • Systemic inflammatory response18
  • Seizures19
  • Death20

Not surprisingly, both Lyme and Candida can trigger the release of similar inflammatory compounds which are associated with increased symptoms.

Both Lyme and Candida infections can trigger the increase of multiple inflammatory compounds
Candida21 and Lyme disease22 infections have been shown to trigger the release of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8)23, and Interleukin-10 (IL-10)24. IL-1β is implicated in patients with depression25 and joint inflammation26. IL-6 is strongly associated with rheumatoid arthritis27, depression28, hostility29, fatigue30, flu-like symptoms and fever31, and cognitive impairment32. IL-8 is implicated in patients with anxiety33, meningitis34, and spirochete (leptospira) induced liver inflammation35. IL-10 is associated with irritable bowel disease36 and fatigue37. Unfortunately, these infections also employ other mechanisms to help them survive in their hosts.

Candida and Lyme employ multiple mechanisms to survive longer
Both infections are capable of hiding inside of cells38, and infecting the brain39. They can producing biofilms40, which are a slime produced to protect against antimicrobial drugs41, the killer cells of the immune system, and against other pathogens. Biofilms can increase drug resistance by a factor of ten to a thousand fold42. Biofilms are believed to be a main cause of recurring Candida or Lyme disease symptoms that persist despite multiple rounds of antibiotics43 or antifungal medications44. In addition to increased resistance from biofilms, Candida has also developed intrinsic and acquired resistance to multiple antifungal drugs45. In addition to biofilms, Lyme bacteria and Candida are capable of producing proteins that lower the activation of the complement immune response46. The complement immune system is a primary coordinator of the innate and adaptive immune responses for killing invading pathogens47.

What else can help people with Lyme disease to fight a drug-resistant, biofilm forming, immune system manipulating, systemic Candida infection?

Here are four essential oils that are effective at inhibiting stubborn Candida infections
Fortunately, there are essential oils that have been found to inhibit drug resistant Candida, cut through biofilms, and enhance the immune response to invading infections. Some of these oils also help with reducing inflammatory compounds that are elevated in a Lyme and Candida infection. Preparing the remedies in a micronized form called a liposome increases their antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties. High dose liposomal antifungal medications have been safe and effective at treating systemic Candida infections in premature infants48. Since liposomes are so small and are surrounded by a lipid, they have a greater ability to penetrate into cells where these infections can hide. Which is why liposomal remedies may be highly effective at helping patients with eliminating a resistant Candida infection.

Anti-Candida Essential Oil #1: Eucalyptus Essential Oil
In multiple lab studies, eucalyptus essential oil was highly effective at inhibiting the growth of fluconazole resistant Candida biofilms49, inhibited the growth of hospital acquired drug resistant strains of Candida50 and inducing innate cell mediated immune response against infections51. In other studies, eucalyptus oil was effective in relieving post-operative pain52 and inhibiting nitric oxide inflammatory production53. In addition to eucalyptus oil, cinnamon has excellent anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Candida Essential Oil #2: Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil
In multiple studies, cinnamon essential oil is effective at inhibiting Candida albicans54, Candida biofilms55, hospital acquired strains of Candida56, respiratory tract Candida57, and fluconazole-resistant Candida58. When combined in a capsule with patchouli essential oil, 71% of patients infected with an intestinal infection of multiple species of Candida were cured59. Liposomal cinnamon oil was effective at inhibiting drug resistant staphylococcus and it’s biofilms60. Cinnamon oil was effective in lab studies at inhibiting these inflammatory compounds: neurological inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) inflammation61. Caution: cinnamon oil has produced allergic dermatitis in some cases when placed on the skin. This oil may interfere with blood clotting. In one case, a boy drank 60 ml of cinnamon oil upon a dare and experienced symptoms of burning sensation in the mouth, chest and stomach, dizziness, double vision, nausea, vomiting and later collapsed62. Another promising anti-Candida essential oil is lemongrass.

Anti-Candida Essential Oil #3: Lemongrass Essential Oil
Vaporized Lemongrass oil was 100% effective at inhibiting Candida albicans in a lab study63. In other studies, lemongrass essential oil inhibited multi-drug resistant Candida albicans64, multi-drug resistant strains of Streptococcus and Candida65, and multiple species of Candida66. Lemongrass essential oil has an enhanced killing effect against two species of Candida when combined with silver ions67. Lemongrass oil followed by clove oil was highly effective against Candida albicans and its biofilms68. In one lab study, lemongrass oil inhibited the production of IL-1beta and IL-669. In a human study, lemongrass oil reduced anxiety and tension70. Another spice oil with anti-Candida properties is oregano.

Anti-Candida Essential Oil #4: Oregano Essential Oil
In multiple studies, oregano essential oil was highly effective at inhibiting multiple drug resistant species of Candida71, stopping germination and mycelial growth of Candida albicans in a dose dependent manner72, and inducing cell wall and membrane damage in thirty different strains of Candida albicans73. Oregano oil inhibited IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNF-alpha inflammatory compounds in a mouse experiment74. Using multiple essential oils in combination can help with reducing systemic Candida infection symptoms and inflammation.

Essential oils in combination can help to resolve systemic Candida infection symptoms in people with Lyme
Similar to clearing out a tangled mass of ivy, essential oils can help people with Lyme to weed out systemic Candida symptoms. Combining these oils together may enhance their anti-Candia and anti-biofilm properties. Patients that have taken these oils combined with a carrier oil under their tongue have reported reduced symptoms of inflammation, improved sleep, and less brain fog.

When encapsulated into a micronized particle called a liposome, these oils may be capable of even greater penetration into the cells, nervous system, and into biofilms where Candida can hide. Through inhibiting the production of inflammatory compounds, these oils may also help with relieving physical symptoms and uncomfortable emotions that are associated with Candida toxins and inflammation. Since some of these essential oils have cautions on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

Next step: Come to the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease evening lecture on Monday November 7th at 6pm in Frederick, Maryland to learn more about essential oils, herbs, and treatments for healing Lyme disease, co-infection, and Candida symptoms.

http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme

Also learn about effective remedies and treatments for relieving persistent symptoms of Lyme and co-infections including: cold laser, Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cupping, LED therapy, moxabustion, acupuncture, liposomal herbs, essential oils, bee venom, and more!

P.S. Do you have experiences where remedies or treatments helped you to clear a resistant Candida infection? Tell us about it.


1 “Candidiasis | Types of Diseses | Fungal Diseases | CDC.” Accessed October 10, 2016. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/.
2 “Symptoms | Invasive Candidiasis | Candidiasis | Types of Diseases | Fungal Diseases | CDC.” Accessed October 10, 2016.
https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/invasive/symptoms.html.
3 Takado, Yuhei, Takayoshi Shimohata, Izumi Kawachi, Keiko Tanaka, and Masatoyo Nishizawa. “[Successful treatment of neuroborreliosis with combined administration of
antibiotics and steroids: a case report].” Rinshō Shinkeigaku = Clinical Neurology 52, no. 6 (2012): 411–15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22790802
4 Singh, S. K., and H. J. Girschick. “Lyme Borreliosis: From Infection to Autoimmunity.” Clinical Microbiology and Infection: The Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 10, no. 7 (July 2004): 598–614.doi:10.1111/j.1469-0691.2004.00895.x. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15214872
5 Mitrović, S., D. Milosević, D. Dankuc, and R. Jović. “[Mycotic disease of the mucous membranes of the head and neck].” Medicinski Pregled 53, no. 1–2 (February 2000):
85–88. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10953558
6 Diterich, Isabel, Carolin Rauter, Carsten J. Kirschning, and Thomas Hartung. “Borrelia Burgdorferi-Induced Tolerance as a Model of Persistence via Immunosuppression.”
Infection and Immunity 71, no. 7 (July 2003): 3979–87. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12819085
7 “Symptoms | Invasive Candidiasis | Candidiasis | Types of Diseases | Fungal Diseases | CDC.” Accessed October 10, 2016.
https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/invasive/symptoms.html.
8 Evengård, Birgitta, Hanna Gräns, Elisabeth Wahlund, and Carl Erik Nord. “Increased Number of Candida Albicans in the Faecal Microflora of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Patients during the Acute Phase of Illness.” Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 42, no. 12 (December 2007): 1514–15. doi:10.1080/00365520701580397.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17886123
9 Cater, R. E. “Chronic Intestinal Candidiasis as a Possible Etiological Factor in the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.” Medical Hypotheses 44, no. 6 (June 1995): 507–15.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7476598
10 Voice, R. A., S. F. Bradley, J. A. Sangeorzan, and C. A. Kauffman. “Chronic Candidal Meningitis: An Uncommon Manifestation of Candidiasis.” Clinical Infectious Diseases:
An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 19, no. 1 (July 1994): 60–66. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7948559
11 Yampolsky, Claudio, Marcelo Corti, and Ricardo Negroni. “Fungal Cerebral Abscess in a Diabetic Patient Successfully Treated with Surgery Followed by Prolonged
Antifungal Therapy.” Revista Iberoamericana De Micología 27, no. 1 (March 31, 2010): 6–9. doi:10.1016/j.riam.2009.12.001. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20189857
12 Gamaletsou, Maria N., Blandine Rammaert, Marimelle A. Bueno, Nikolaos V. Sipsas, Brad Moriyama, Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis, Emmanuel Roilides, et al. “Candida Arthritis: Analysis of 112 Pediatric and Adult Cases.” Open Forum Infectious Diseases 3, no. 1 (January 2016): ofv207. doi:10.1093/ofid/ofv207.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26858961
13 Franklin, W. G., A. B. Simon, and T. M. Sodeman. “Candida Myocarditis without Valvulitis.” The American Journal of Cardiology 38, no. 7 (December 1976): 924–28.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/998527
14 Severance, Emily G., Kristin L. Gressitt, Catherine R. Stallings, Emily Katsafanas, Lucy A. Schweinfurth, Christina L. Savage, Maria B. Adamos, et al. “Candida Albicans
Exposures, Sex Specificity and Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.” NPJ Schizophrenia 2 (2016): 16018. doi:10.1038/npjschz.2016.18.
http://www.nature.com/articles/npjschz201618
15 Rucklidge, Julia J. “Could Yeast Infections Impair Recovery from Mental Illness? A Case Study Using Micronutrients and Olive Leaf Extract for the Treatment of ADHD and Depression.” Advances in Mind-Body Medicine 27, no. 3 (2013): 14–18. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23784606
16 Irving, G., D. Miller, A. Robinson, S. Reynolds, and A. J. Copas. “Psychological Factors Associated with Recurrent Vaginal Candidiasis: A Preliminary Study.” Sexually
Transmitted Infections 74, no. 5 (October 1998): 334–38. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1758140/
17 Dyess, D. L., R. N. Garrison, and D. E. Fry. “Candida Sepsis. Implications of Polymicrobial Blood-Borne Infection.” Archives of Surgery (Chicago, Ill.: 1960) 120, no. 3
(March 1985): 345–48. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3970669
18 Liao, Xuelian, Haibo Qiu, Ruoyu Li, Fengmei Guo, Wei Liu, Mei Kang, Yan Kang, and China-SCAN Team. “Risk Factors for Fluconazole-Resistant Invasive Candidiasis in
Intensive Care Unit Patients: An Analysis from the China Survey of Candidiasis Study.” Journal of Critical Care 30, no. 4 (August 2015): 862.e1-5.
doi:10.1016/j.jcrc.2015.04.002. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26002430
19 Queiroz, L. S., A. Nucci, and J. L. De Faria. “[Systemic candidiasis with localization in the brain. Anatomo-clinical study of 5 cases].” Arquivos De Neuro-Psiquiatria 34, no. 1 (March 1976): 18031. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1267947
20 Leroy, Olivier, Jean-Pierre Gangneux, Philippe Montravers, Jean-Paul Mira, François Gouin, Jean-Pierre Sollet, Jean Carlet, et al. “Epidemiology, Management, and Risk
Factors for Death of Invasive Candida Infections in Critical Care: A Multicenter, Prospective, Observational Study in France (2005-2006).” Critical Care Medicine 37, no.
5 (May 2009): 1612–18. doi:10.1097/CCM.0b013e31819efac0. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19325476
21 Whiley, Robert A., Alan T. Cruchley, Carelyn Gore, and Eleni Hagi-Pavli. “Candida Albicans Strain-Dependent Modulation of pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Release by in Vitro
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