Oct 29 18

Four Essential Oils for Stopping Bartonella from Taking Over Your Brain

by Greg

 

For people with neurological Bartonella symptoms of swelling and anxiety
by Greg Lee

My nephew invited us to his wedding in Hawaii. As we were booking our trip, the Kilauea volcano started spewing lava into residential neighborhoods. People had no other choice and had to evacuate as their homes and cars were burned by the spreading lava.

How is flowing lava similar to neurological Bartonella infections in people with Lyme disease?

Just like a hot lava eruption, a Bartonella infection can slowly burn through your body
Bartonella is a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that can be transmitted to humans via insect bites1, animal scratches and bites2, organ transplant3, needle sticks4, and blood transfusion5. At least thirteen different species of Bartonella are known to infect humans6. Bartonella has been shown to infect endothelial cells, macrophages, red blood cells7, and the lymphatic system8. Bartonella can spread through the bloodstream via the lymphatic system9. Bartonella manipulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor10 (VEGF) and Interleukin-811 (IL-8) to make it easier for it to spread via new blood vessels through the skin and the body. Unfortunately, Bartonella can also infect the nervous system.

Bartonella has been detected in the cerebral spinal fluid of patients12
Patients with a Bartonella infection may present with multiple neurological symptoms including: confusion, encephalitis13, vision loss, neuroretinitis, optic neuropathy14, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebral embolism15, fever, vomiting, ataxia16, slurred speech, weakness17, convulsions18, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy19, depression, anxiety, mood swings, severe headaches, muscle spasms, decreased peripheral vision, diminished tactile sensation, and hallucinations20. Multiple patients have both Bartonella and Lyme disease in their nervous system21. Inflammation may play a role in Bartonella’s ability to spread into the brain.

Inflammatory compounds may help Bartonella spread into the nervous system
Patients diagnosed with Bartonella have elevated levels of IL-822, Interleukin-1023 (IL-10), and vascular endothelial growth factor24 (VEGF). Elevated levels of IL-825 and VEGF26 have been correlated with blood brain barrier increased permeability and dysfunction. Il-10 may help to protect the blood brain barrier27. Similarly, inflammatory compounds Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin- (IL-8), chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), and CXCL13 are implicated in the spread of Lyme disease in the nervous system28. Another factor in persistent neurological infections may be due to drug resistant Bartonella strains that have been discovered.

Bartonella drug resistant strains have been discovered
Highly antibiotic resistant mutants of Bartonella bacilliformis have been found in a lab study29. Another study has found drug resistant forms of Bartonella henselae30.

Can essential oils help to reduce recurring neurological symptoms by preventing how Bartonella may spread into the nervous system?

Fortunately, there are four essential oils that lower the inflammatory compounds that Bartonella uses to spread through the body
In multiple studies, essential oils were effective at lowering inflammatory compounds and symptoms like anxiety that may be elevated in neurological Bartonella infections. Formulating these oils into microparticles called liposomes may help deliver these remedies deeper inside the brain. Many of these essential oils have been used safely for years in our food supply31. Formulating these essential oils into microparticles called liposomes may help them penetrate deeper inside of blood cells, endothelial cells and the nervous system where Bartonella likes to hide32.

Anti-Neurological Bartonella Essential Oil #1: Peppermint
In a mouse wound study, peppermint essential oil was effective at lowering VEGF and increasing IL-1033. Peppermint oil has had positive effects in reducing anxiety in human studies34. Do not apply peppermint oil undiluted to the feet of children under 12 years old, avoid large doses, it may cause heartburn, perianal burning, blurred vision, nausea and vomiting when taken internally. Peppermint essential oil use is contraindicated in children under 30 months old, and people should avoid the intake of peppermint oil with gallbladder disease, severe liver damage, gallstones, chronic heartburn35, and cases of cardiac fibrillation and in patients with a G6PD (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) deficiency36. This oil is classified as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA37. Black cumin seed oil may also help to lower VEGF.

Anti-Neurological Bartonella Essential Oil #2: Black Cumin Seed
In lab studies, black cumin seed oil down regulated the expression of VEGF in endothelial cells38. In a rat study, this oil increased levels of tryptophan and reduced anxiety levels39.  Black cumin seed oil is contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. It’s use is cautioned with diabetes medications, on hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin, and in children under 2 years of age40. Mastic gum essential oil also lowers VEGF in experiments.

Anti-Neurological Bartonella Essential Oil #3: Mastic Gum
In a mouse lab study, mastic essential oil inhibited the release of VEGF41. In an outpatient study on Crohn’s disease, mastic gum decreased IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP)42. Citron essential oils lowered VEGF in a lab study.

Anti-Neurological Bartonella Essential Oil #4: Citron
In a lab study, citron essential oil lowered VEGF in endothelial cells43. These essential oils alone or in combination may help to reduce neurological symptoms caused by a spreading Bartonella infection in the nervous system.

Essential oils may help to reduce the spread of inflammation caused by neurological Bartonella infection
Similar to lava that is stopped by the cold waters of the ocean, essential oils that lower Bartonella inflammatory compounds may limit it’s spread in the brain and reduce neurological symptoms. Formulating these essential oils into microparticle liposomes may enhance their ability to penetrate into cells and stop Bartonella from invading the nervous system. Since these essential oils have cautions and contraindications on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where treatment or remedies helped you reduce neurological symptoms from a Bartonella infection? Tell us about it.

>> Next step: Come to our live evening lecture: Stopping Lyme Disease Pain by 75% or More with Liposomes in Frederick, Maryland on Wednesday November 7th at 6pm to learn more about treatments and remedies for multiple infections, natural methods for reducing neurological problems, inflammation, and pain caused by Lyme disease, Candida, co-infections, parasites, and mold. http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme


1 Billeter, S. A., M. G. Levy, B. B. Chomel, and E. B. Breitschwerdt. “Vector Transmission of Bartonella Species with Emphasis on the Potential for Tick Transmission.” Medical and Veterinary Entomology 22, no. 1 (March 2008): 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2915.2008.00713.x.

2 “Transmission | Bartonella | CDC.” Accessed July 22, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/bartonella/transmission/.

3 Scolfaro, C., F. Mignone, F. Gennari, A. Alfarano, A. Veltri, R. Romagnoli, and M. Salizzoni. “Possible Donor-Recipient Bartonellosis Transmission in a Pediatric Liver Transplant.” Transplant Infectious Disease: An Official Journal of the Transplantation Society 10, no. 6 (December 2008): 431–33. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3062.2008.00326.x.

4 Breitschwerdt, Edward Bealmear. “Bartonellosis: One Health Perspectives for an Emerging Infectious Disease.” ILAR Journal 55, no. 1 (2014): 46–58. https://doi.org/10.1093/ilar/ilu015.

5 Núñez, M. Antonieta, Karla Contreras, M. Soledad Depix, Enrique Geoffroy, Nicolás Villagra, Sandra Mellado, and Ana M. Salinas. “[Prevalence of Bartonella henselae in blood donors and risk of blood transmission in Chile].” Revista Chilena De Infectologia: Organo Oficial De La Sociedad Chilena De Infectologia 34, no. 6 (December 2017): 539–43. https://doi.org/10.4067/S0716-10182017000600539.

6 Lamas, C., A. Curi, Mn Bóia, and Ers Lemos. “Human Bartonellosis: Seroepidemiological and Clinical Features with an Emphasis on Data from Brazil – a Review.” Memorias Do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 103, no. 3 (May 2008): 221–35.

7 Breitschwerdt, Edward Bealmear. “Bartonellosis: One Health Perspectives for an Emerging Infectious Disease.” ILAR Journal 55, no. 1 (2014): 46–58. https://doi.org/10.1093/ilar/ilu015.

8 Choi, Alexander H., Michael Bolaris, Diana K. Nguyen, Eduard H. Panosyan, Joseph L. Lasky, and Gloria B. Duane. “Clinicocytopathologic Correlation in an Atypical Presentation of Lymphadenopathy with Review of Literature.” American Journal of Clinical Pathology 143, no. 5 (May 2015): 749–54. https://doi.org/10.1309/AJCPPSKWRX0GD8HJ.

9 Hong, Jiehua, Yan Li, Xiuguo Hua, Yajie Bai, Chunyan Wang, Caixia Zhu, Yuming Du, Zhibiao Yang, and Congli Yuan. “Lymphatic Circulation Disseminates Bartonella Infection Into Bloodstream.” The Journal of Infectious Diseases 215, no. 2 (January 15, 2017): 303–11. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiw526.

10 Kempf, V. A., B. Volkmann, M. Schaller, C. A. Sander, K. Alitalo, T. Riess, and I. B. Autenrieth. “Evidence of a Leading Role for VEGF in Bartonella Henselae-Induced Endothelial Cell Proliferations.” Cellular Microbiology 3, no. 9 (September 2001): 623–32.

11 McCord, Amy M., Sandra I. Resto-Ruiz, and Burt E. Anderson. “Autocrine Role for Interleukin-8 in Bartonella Henselae-Induced Angiogenesis.” Infection and Immunity 74, no. 9 (September 2006): 5185–90. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00622-06.

12 Samarkos, Michael, Vasiliki Antoniadou, Aristeidis G. Vaiopoulos, and Mina Psichogiou. “Encephalopathy in an Adult with Cat-Scratch Disease.” BMJ Case Reports 2018 (March 5, 2018). https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2017-223647.

13 Samarkos, Michael, Vasiliki Antoniadou, Aristeidis G. Vaiopoulos, and Mina Psichogiou. “Encephalopathy in an Adult with Cat-Scratch Disease.” BMJ Case Reports 2018 (March 5, 2018). https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2017-223647.

14 Habot-Wilner, Zohar, Omer Trivizki, Michaella Goldstein, Anat Kesler, Shiri Shulman, Josepha Horowitz, Radgonde Amer, et al. “Cat-Scratch Disease: Ocular Manifestations and Treatment Outcome.” Acta Ophthalmologica, March 5, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1111/aos.13684.

15 Yuan, Y., M. Shen, and X. G. Gao. “[Presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage and then blood culture negative infective endocarditis: a case report and literature review].” Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao. Yi Xue Ban = Journal of Peking University. Health Sciences 49, no. 6 (December 18, 2017): 1081–86.

16 Barnafi, Natalia, Natalia Conca, Cecilia von Borries, Isabel Fuentes, Francisca Montoya, and Elisa Alcalde. “[Central nervous system infection by Bartonella henselae associated with a choroid plexus papilloma].” Revista Chilena De Infectologia: Organo Oficial De La Sociedad Chilena De Infectologia 34, no. 4 (August 2017): 383–88. https://doi.org/10.4067/s0716-10182017000400383.

17 Teoh, Laurence S G, Hamish H Hart, May Ching Soh, Jonathan P Christiansen, Hasan Bhally, Martin S Philips, and Dominic S Rai-Chaudhuri. “Bartonella Henselae Aortic Valve Endocarditis Mimicking Systemic Vasculitis.” BMJ Case Reports 2010 (October 21, 2010). https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr.04.2010.2945.

18 Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar, Marna Ericson, Ricardo Maggi, and Edward B. Breitschwerdt. “Vasculitis, Cerebral Infarction and Persistent Bartonella Henselae Infection in a Child.” Parasites & Vectors 9, no. 1 (2016): 254. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-016-1547-9.

19 Mascarelli, Patricia E, Ricardo G Maggi, Sarah Hopkins, B Robert Mozayeni, Chelsea L Trull, Julie M Bradley, Barbara C Hegarty, and Edward B Breitschwerdt. “Bartonella Henselae Infection in a Family Experiencing Neurological and Neurocognitive Abnormalities after Woodlouse Hunter Spider Bites.” Parasites & Vectors 6 (April 15, 2013): 98. https://doi.org/10.1186/1756-3305-6-98.

20 Breitschwerdt, Edward B., Patricia E. Mascarelli, Lori A. Schweickert, Ricardo G. Maggi, Barbara C. Hegarty, Julie M. Bradley, and Christopher W. Woods. “Hallucinations, Sensory Neuropathy, and Peripheral Visual Deficits in a Young Woman Infected with Bartonella Koehlerae ▿.” Journal of Clinical Microbiology 49, no. 9 (September 2011): 3415–17. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00833-11.

21 Podsiadły, Edyta, Tomasz Chmielewski, and Stanisława Tylewska-Wierzbanowska. “Bartonella Henselae and Borrelia Burgdorferi Infections of the Central Nervous System.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 990 (June 2003): 404–6.

22 McCord, Amy M., Sandra I. Resto-Ruiz, and Burt E. Anderson. “Autocrine Role for Interleukin-8 in Bartonella Henselae-Induced Angiogenesis.” Infection and Immunity 74, no. 9 (September 2006): 5185–90. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00622-06.

23 Huarcaya, Erick, Ciro Maguina, Ivan Best, Nelson Solorzano, and Lawrence Leeman. “Immunological Response in Cases of Complicated and Uncomplicated Bartonellosis during Pregnancy.” Revista Do Instituto De Medicina Tropical De Sao Paulo 49, no. 5 (October 2007): 335–37.

24 Kempf, V. A., B. Volkmann, M. Schaller, C. A. Sander, K. Alitalo, T. Riess, and I. B. Autenrieth. “Evidence of a Leading Role for VEGF in Bartonella Henselae-Induced Endothelial Cell Proliferations.” Cellular Microbiology 3, no. 9 (September 2001): 623–32.

25 Kossmann, T., P. F. Stahel, P. M. Lenzlinger, H. Redl, R. W. Dubs, O. Trentz, G. Schlag, and M. C. Morganti-Kossmann. “Interleukin-8 Released into the Cerebrospinal Fluid after Brain Injury Is Associated with Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Nerve Growth Factor Production.” Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism: Official Journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 17, no. 3 (March 1997): 280–89. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004647-199703000-00005.

26 Zhang, Zheng Gang, Li Zhang, Quan Jiang, Ruilan Zhang, Kenneth Davies, Cecylia Powers, Nicholas van Bruggen, and Michael Chopp. “VEGF Enhances Angiogenesis and Promotes Blood-Brain Barrier Leakage in the Ischemic Brain.” Journal of Clinical Investigation 106, no. 7 (October 1, 2000): 829–38.

27 Lin, Ronggui, Fei Chen, Shi Wen, Tianhong Teng, Yu Pan, and Heguang Huang. “Interleukin-10 Attenuates Impairment of the Blood-Brain Barrier in a Severe Acute Pancreatitis Rat Model.” Journal of Inflammation (London, England) 15 (2018): 4. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12950-018-0180-0.

28 Ramesh, Geeta, Peter J. Didier, John D. England, Lenay Santana-Gould, Lara A. Doyle-Meyers, Dale S. Martin, Mary B. Jacobs, and Mario T. Philipp. “Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis.” The American Journal of Pathology 185, no. 5 (May 2015): 1344–60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajpath.2015.01.024.

29 Gomes, Cláudia, Sandra Martínez-Puchol, Lidia Ruiz-Roldán, Maria J. Pons, Juana del Valle Mendoza, and Joaquim Ruiz. “Development and Characterisation of Highly Antibiotic Resistant Bartonella Bacilliformis Mutants.” Scientific Reports 6 (September 26, 2016): 33584. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep33584.

30 Biswas, Silpak, Ricardo G. Maggi, Mark G. Papich, and Edward B. Breitschwerdt. “Molecular Mechanisms of Bartonella Henselae Resistance to Azithromycin, Pradofloxacin and Enrofloxacin.” Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 65, no. 3 (March 1, 2010): 581–82. https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkp459.

31 Hyldgaard, Morten, Tina Mygind, and Rikke Louise Meyer. “Essential Oils in Food Preservation: Mode of Action, Synergies, and Interactions with Food Matrix Components.” Frontiers in Microbiology 3 (January 25, 2012). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2012.00012.

32 Sherry, Mirna, Catherine Charcosset, Hatem Fessi, and Hélène Greige-Gerges. “Essential Oils Encapsulated in Liposomes: A Review.” Journal of Liposome Research 23, no. 4 (December 2013): 268–75. https://doi.org/10.3109/08982104.2013.819888.

33 Modarresi, Mohammad, Mohammad-Reza Farahpour, and Behzad Baradaran. “Topical Application of Mentha Piperita Essential Oil Accelerates Wound Healing in Infected Mice Model.” Inflammopharmacology, July 6, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10787-018-0510-0.

34 Stea, Susanna, Alina Beraudi, and Dalila De Pasquale. “Essential Oils for Complementary Treatment of Surgical Patients: State of the Art.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : ECAM 2014 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/726341.

35 “Peppermint Safety Info | National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy.” Accessed April 1, 2017. http://naha.org/naha-blog/peppermint-safety-info/.

36 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013.

37 “CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21.” Accessed October 28, 2018. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20.

38 M. Baharetha, Hussein, Zeyad Nassar, Abdalrahim Aisha, Abd Kadir M.O, Zhari Ismail, and Amin Malik Shah Abdul Majid. “Essential Oil of Nigella Sativa Inhibits Angiogenesis via Down-Regulation of VEGF Expression,” 2015. https://doi.org/10.4172/2375-4273.C1.009.

39 Perveen, Tahira, Saida Haider, Sumera Kanwal, and Darakhshan Jabeen Haleem. “Repeated Administration of Nigella Sativa Decreases 5-HT Turnover and Produces Anxiolytic Effects in Rats.” Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 22, no. 2 (April 2009): 139–44.

40 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. 2 edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, 2013. p. 793.

41 Loutrari, Heleni, Sophia Magkouta, Anastasia Pyriochou, Vasiliki Koika, Fragiskos N. Kolisis, Andreas Papapetropoulos, and Charis Roussos. “Mastic Oil from Pistacia Lentiscus Var. Chia Inhibits Growth and Survival of Human K562 Leukemia Cells and Attenuates Angiogenesis.” Nutrition and Cancer 55, no. 1 (2006): 86–93. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327914nc5501_11.

42 Kaliora, Andriana C, Maria G Stathopoulou, John K Triantafillidis, George VZ Dedoussis, and Nikolaos K Andrikopoulos. “Chios Mastic Treatment of Patients with Active Crohn’s Disease.” World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG 13, no. 5 (February 7, 2007): 748–53. https://doi.org/10.3748/wjg.v13.i5.748.

43 “Effects of Citron Essential Oils on Normal Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Stimulated with Vitamin D3 and TNF-A.” Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 76, no. 6 (June 1, 2017): AB110. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.04.436.

Jul 29 18

Can These Essential Oils Help Lyme Disease Patients Overcome Chronic Candida Infections?

by Greg

For people diagnosed with Lyme disease that have persistent Candida infections
by Greg Lee

Have you ever been frustrated by a really slow computer? A month ago, I was making a video and it took f-o-r-e-v-e-r to edit the final version. The computer was being choked by a group of programs called “Bloatware.” These programs ate up huge amounts of disk space and processing which turned my computer into a slow moving tortoise.

How is Bloatware that slows down your computer similar to recurring Candida infections in people also diagnosed with Lyme disease?

Just like Bloatware, Candida can slow you down by eating up your valuable energy and increasing inflammation
According to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Candida lives on the skin and in the digestive tract without normally causing symptoms. Candida can cause local infections in the mouth, throat, esophagus and in the vagina. Candida can also cause systemic infections which affect the blood, heart, brain, eyes, bones, and other parts of the body1. Symptoms found in persistent Candida infections can include leaky gut, irritable bowel syndrome2, chronic fatigue3, arthritis4, clinical depression5, cerebral abscesses6, neck stiffness, seizures7, fever, chills, weakness, and death8. An immune system weakened by Lyme disease may make people more vulnerable to Candida infections.

Lyme disease patients may be more susceptible to recurring Candida infections
A Lyme disease infection may weaken the immune system and make people more susceptible to opportunistic Candida infections9. Also, many Lyme patients receive prolonged antibiotic therapy which can kill off healthy gut microbes and can lead to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), leaky gut and Candida overgrowth10. Another theory for chronic Candida in Lyme patients is an inability to produce the necessary inflammatory compounds for eliminating yeast infections.

Chronic Candida infection patients may not be able to produce important anti-fungal inflammatory compounds
In a UK study on chronic Candida infection patients, Interleukin-2 (IL-2), Interleukin-12 (IL-12) production was significantly lower and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) production was much higher11. The study indicates that Candida patients over produce IL-6 which can lead to decreased IL-12. Lower IL-12 is correlated with the inability to clear fungal infections. Patients with gastrointestinal Candida have higher levels of Interleukin-17 (IL-17) which promotes fungal colonization12. Not only Candida, but also Lyme infections can lead to excess inflammation production.

Excess inflammatory compounds may also prevent clearing of Lyme as well as Candida
Increased IL-6 leading to decreased levels of IL-12 may enable Lyme and Candida infections to persist. In neurological Lyme patients, higher levels of inflammatory compounds including IL-6, IL-2, Interleukin-5 (IL-5), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), and CXCL13 were found in spinal fluid13. In a Borrelia infected mice study, decreased IL-12 lead to decreased arthritis and increased levels of Lyme disease in tissues14. In another study, increased IL-17 led to the development of destructive arthritis in mice infected with Borrelia15. Drug resistant strains of Candida may also lead to persistent yeast infections in Lyme patients.

Candida can persist despite multiple anti-fungal medications
In the US and Canada, multi-drug resistant strains of Candida have been found in immune compromised patients16. Candida can also produce a protective slime called a “biofilm” which may make infections up to 1000x more drug resistant17. As a result of resistant and biofilm forms of Candida, Lyme patients undergoing antibiotic therapy may experience recurring Candida infections.

Are there natural remedies that can help to reduce recurring symptoms by targeting antibiotic resistant and biofilm forms of Candida?

Fortunately, there are five essential oils that have been effective against drug resistant and biofilm forms of Candida
In a multiple studies, essential oils were effective at inhibiting drug resistant forms of Candida than anti-fungal medications. Other essential oils were highly effective at reducing Candida biofilms. Many of these essential oils have been used safely for years in our food supply18 and to help patients with Candida and Lyme disease to reduce relapsing symptoms. Microparticle “liposome” essential oils have greater penetration into organs and tissues in animal and lab studies19.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #1: Clove Bud
Clove bud essential oil demonstrated considerable anti-fungal properties against Fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida in one lab study20. In another study, clove bud exhibited anti-biofilm activity against Candida species biofilms21. In another lab study, clove bud inhibited IL-6, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and IL-1022.

Clove bud essential oil eradicated all Lyme disease persister cells and dissolved biofilms in a lab study23. In multiple animal and lab studies, clove bud oil has also been effective against biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus24, E. Coli25, and Aeromonas hydrophila26. In multiple lab studies, clove oil inhibits Salmonella typhimurium, E. coli, B. cereus, Listeria innocua, Morganella morganii, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacteriaceae, S. aureus, and Pseudomonas species27. This oil also posses potent anti-fungal properties against  Aspergillus flavus28.

Clove bud oil use is cautioned in pregnancy. This oil has anti-coagulant properties and is cautioned with the use of diabetic medications, anticoagulant medications, after major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders. It may interact with pethidine, MAOIs or SSRIs. It is also cautioned against using this oil on diseased or damaged, or hypersensitive skin, and with children under 2 years old This oil has US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status29. Similar to clove bud oil, tea tree has excellent anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #2: Tea Tree
In lab studies, tea tree oil inhibited drug resistant Candida strains30 and was effective at inhibiting biofilm growth31. Tea tree oil was also effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its biofilm,33 Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus34, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium chrysogenum35, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma fermentans36, group A streptococcus37, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium culmorum, Pyrenophora graminea38, Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum39 in lab and animal studies.

In an endotoxin lab study, tea tree essential oil was effective at lowering inflammatory compounds IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-1040. In another lab study, tea tree oil decreased IL-2 and increased anti-inflammatory compound IL-441. Caution: some cases have  been reported where tea tree oil caused allergic dermatitis when placed on the skin42. In five cases, high doses of this oil internally, 0.5-1.0 ml/kg, have produced central nervous system symptoms of loss of coordination, drowsiness, unconsciousness, diarrhea, and abdominal pain43. Just like tea tree, geranium essential oil has multiple anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #3: Geranium
In multiple lab studies, geranium oil inhibited Fluconazole resistant Candida strains44 and inhibited multiple Candida species biofilms45. Geranium oil was also effective at significantly decreasing inflammatory compounds IL-6, IL-10, IL-2 and COX-2 levels when exposed to Candida proteins in another lab study46. In a mouse study, this oil inhibited the degranulation of mast cells47.

The use of geranium oil is cautioned with diabetes medications, drugs metabolized by CYP2B6, and has a low risk of skin sensitization48. Just like geranium, savory reduced resistant forms of Candida.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #4: Savory
Due to their compositional similarity, winter and summer savory essential oils are grouped together here. In one lab study, winter savory essential oil was highly effective at inhibiting drug resistant strains of Candida glabrata49. In another lab study, summer savory essential oil demonstrated substantial anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans and it’s biofilms50.

Since these oils may inhibit blood clotting; use is cautioned with anticoagulant medications, major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, other bleeding disorders. Use is also cautioned with diabetic medications, use on mucous membranes due to a moderate risk of irritation and use on hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin due to a low risk of skin irritation. Use is also cautioned in children under 2 years of age51. Similar to savory, lemon has demonstrated anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #5: Lemon
In lab studies, lemon essential oil was effective at inhibiting drug-resistant Candida species52. This oil was also 100% effective at reducing a mixed species Candida albicans and E. Coli biofilm53. If applied to the skin, skin must not be exposed to sunlight or sunbed rays for 12 hours54. These essential oils in combination may help to reduce relapsing symptoms caused by drug resistant and biofilm forms of Candida in patients with Lyme disease.

Essential oils may help to reduce recurring symptoms caused by antifungal resistant and biofilm forms of Candida
Similar to deleting the Bloatware off your computer to speed it up, a powerful combination of essential oils may help you to overcome energy draining and relapsing symptoms caused by drug resistant and biofilm forms of Candida. Formulating these remedies into microparticle liposomes may enhance the stability and extend the anti-fungal activity of these essential oils. Since these essential oils have cautions and contraindications on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where treatment or remedies helped you reduce recurring symptoms from recurring Candida infections? Tell us about it.

>> Next step: Come to our live evening lecture: Getting Rid of Chronic Lyme Disease Issues in Frederick, Maryland on Wednesday August 1st at 6pm to learn more about treatments and remedies for multiple infections, natural methods for reducing neurological problems, inflammation, and pain caused by Lyme disease, Candida, co-infections, parasites, and mold. http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme


1 “Invasive Candidiasis | Candidiasis | Types of Fungal Diseases | Fungal Diseases | CDC,” April 25, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/invasive/index.html.

2 Kogan, Mikhail, Carlos Cuellar Castillo, and Melissa S. Barber. “Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report.” Integrative Medicine (Encinitas, Calif.) 15, no. 3 (June 2016): 44–54.

3 Evengård, Birgitta, Hanna Gräns, Elisabeth Wahlund, and Carl Erik Nord. “Increased Number of Candida Albicans in the Faecal Microflora of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients during the Acute Phase of Illness.” Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 42, no. 12 (December 2007): 1514–15. https://doi.org/10.1080/00365520701580397.

4 Murray, H. W., M. A. Fialk, and R. B. Roberts. “Candida Arthritis. A Manifestation of Disseminated Candidiasis.” The American Journal of Medicine 60, no. 4 (April 1976): 587–95.

5 Irving, G., D. Miller, A. Robinson, S. Reynolds, and A. J. Copas. “Psychological Factors Associated with Recurrent Vaginal Candidiasis: A Preliminary Study.” Sexually Transmitted Infections 74, no. 5 (October 1998): 334–38.

6 Yampolsky, Claudio, Marcelo Corti, and Ricardo Negroni. “Fungal Cerebral Abscess in a Diabetic Patient Successfully Treated with Surgery Followed by Prolonged Antifungal Therapy.” Revista Iberoamericana De Micología 27, no. 1 (March 31, 2010): 6–9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.riam.2009.12.001.

7 Queiroz, L. S., A. Nucci, and J. L. De Faria. “[Systemic candidiasis with localization in the brain. Anatomo-clinical study of 5 cases].” Arquivos De Neuro-Psiquiatria 34, no. 1 (March 1976): 18031.

8 Girishkumar, H., A. M. Yousuf, J. Chivate, and E. Geisler. “Experience with Invasive Candida Infections.” Postgraduate Medical Journal 75, no. 881 (March 1999): 151–53.

9 Smith, Aaron, John Oertle, Dan Warren, and Dino Prato. “Chronic Lyme Disease Complex and Its Commonly Undiagnosed Primary and Secondary Co-Infections.” Open Journal of Medical Microbiology 05 (January 1, 2015): 143–58. https://doi.org/10.4236/ojmm.2015.53018.

10 Kogan, Mikhail, Carlos Cuellar Castillo, and Melissa S. Barber. “Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report.” Integrative Medicine (Encinitas, Calif.) 15, no. 3 (June 2016): 44–54.

11 Lilic, Desa, Ian Gravenor, Neil Robson, David A. Lammas, Pam Drysdale, Jane E. Calvert, Andrew J. Cant, and Mario Abinun. “Deregulated Production of Protective Cytokines in Response to Candida Albicans Infection in Patients with Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis.” Infection and Immunity 71, no. 10 (October 2003): 5690–99. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.71.10.5690-5699.2003.

12 Kumamoto, Carol A. “Inflammation and Gastrointestinal Candida Colonization.” Current Opinion in Microbiology 14, no. 4 (August 2011): 386–91. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2011.07.015.

13 Cerar, T., K. Ogrinc, S. Lotrič-Furlan, J. Kobal, S. Levičnik-Stezinar, F. Strle, and E. Ružić-Sabljić. “Diagnostic Value of Cytokines and Chemokines in Lyme Neuroborreliosis.” Clinical and Vaccine Immunology 20, no. 10 (October 1, 2013): 1578–84. https://doi.org/10.1128/CVI.00353-13.

14 Anguita, J, D H Persing, M Rincon, S W Barthold, and E Fikrig. “Effect of Anti-Interleukin 12 Treatment on Murine Lyme Borreliosis.” Journal of Clinical Investigation 97, no. 4 (February 15, 1996): 1028–34.

15 Burchill, Matthew A., Dean T. Nardelli, Douglas M. England, David J. DeCoster, John A. Christopherson, Steven M. Callister, and Ronald F. Schell. “Inhibition of Interleukin-17 Prevents the Development of Arthritis in Vaccinated Mice Challenged with Borrelia Burgdorferi.” Infection and Immunity 71, no. 6 (June 1, 2003): 3437–42. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.71.6.3437-3442.2003.

16 Colombo, Arnaldo L., João N. de Almeida Júnior, and Jesus Guinea. “Emerging Multidrug-Resistant Candida Species.” Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases 30, no. 6 (December 2017): 528–38. https://doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0000000000000411.

17 Potera, Carol. “ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE: Biofilm Dispersing Agent Rejuvenates Older Antibiotics.” Environmental Health Perspectives 118, no. 7 (July 2010): A288.

18 Hyldgaard, Morten, Tina Mygind, and Rikke Louise Meyer. “Essential Oils in Food Preservation: Mode of Action, Synergies, and Interactions with Food Matrix Components.” Frontiers in Microbiology 3 (January 25, 2012). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2012.00012.

19 Sherry, Mirna, Catherine Charcosset, Hatem Fessi, and Hélène Greige-Gerges. “Essential Oils Encapsulated in Liposomes: A Review.” Journal of Liposome Research 23, no. 4 (December 2013): 268–75. https://doi.org/10.3109/08982104.2013.819888.

20 Pinto, Eugénia, Luís Vale-Silva, Carlos Cavaleiro, and Lígia Salgueiro. “Antifungal Activity of the Clove Essential Oil from Syzygium Aromaticum on Candida, Aspergillus and Dermatophyte Species.” Journal of Medical Microbiology 58, no. Pt 11 (November 2009): 1454–62. https://doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.010538-0.

21 Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad, and Iqbal Ahmad. “Biofilm Inhibition by Cymbopogon Citratus and Syzygium Aromaticum Essential Oils in the Strains of Candida Albicans.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology 140, no. 2 (March 27, 2012): 416–23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2012.01.045.

22 Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda, João Paulo Barreto de Sousa, Jairo Kenupp Bastos, and José Maurício Sforcin. “Clove and Eugenol in Noncytotoxic Concentrations Exert Immunomodulatory/Anti‐inflammatory Action on Cytokine Production by Murine Macrophages.” Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 64, no. 4 (February 7, 2012): 610–16. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-7158.2011.01440.x.

23 Feng, Jie, Shuo Zhang, Wanliang Shi, Nevena Zubcevik, Judith Miklossy, and Ying Zhang. “Selective Essential Oils from Spice or Culinary Herbs Have High Activity against Stationary Phase and Biofilm Borrelia Burgdorferi.” Frontiers in Medicine 4 (2017). https://doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2017.00169.

24 Budri, P. E., N. C. C. Silva, E. C. R. Bonsaglia, A. Fernandes Júnior, J. P. Araújo Júnior, J. T. Doyama, J. L. Gonçalves, M. V. Santos, D. Fitzgerald-Hughes, and V. L. M. Rall. “Effect of Essential Oils of Syzygium Aromaticum and Cinnamomum Zeylanicum and Their Major Components on Biofilm Production in Staphylococcus Aureus Strains Isolated from Milk of Cows with Mastitis.” Journal of Dairy Science 98, no. 9 (September 2015): 5899–5904. https://doi.org/10.3168/jds.2015-9442.

25 Kim, Yong-Guy, Jin-Hyung Lee, Giyeon Gwon, Soon-Il Kim, Jae Gyu Park, and Jintae Lee. “Essential Oils and Eugenols Inhibit Biofilm Formation and the Virulence of Escherichia Coli O157:H7.” Scientific Reports 6 (November 3, 2016): 36377. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep36377.

26 Husain, Fohad Mabood, Iqbal Ahmad, Mohammad Asif, and Qudsia Tahseen. “Influence of Clove Oil on Certain Quorum-Sensing-Regulated Functions and Biofilm of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Aeromonas Hydrophila.” Journal of Biosciences 38, no. 5 (December 2013): 835–44.

27 Liu, Qing, Xiao Meng, Ya Li, Cai-Ning Zhao, Guo-Yi Tang, and Hua-Bin Li. “Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Spices.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences 18, no. 6 (June 16, 2017). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061283.

28 Srikaew, Benyapa, Narumol Matan, and Tanong Aewsiri. “Innovative Production of Fungal Pulp from Trametes Versicolor and Its Application in a Fungal Paper Box Containing Clove Oil.” Journal of Food Science and Technology 54, no. 10 (September 2017): 3058–64. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-017-2741-2.

29 Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals. Second Ed. London, Churchill Livingstone, pp. 909-913.

30 Mertas, Anna, Aleksandra Garbusińska, Ewelina Szliszka, Andrzej Jureczko, Magdalena Kowalska, and Wojciech Król. “The Influence of Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca Alternifolia) on Fluconazole Activity against Fluconazole-Resistant Candida Albicans Strains.” BioMed Research International 2015 (2015): 590470. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/590470.

31 Ramage, Gordon, Steven Milligan, David F. Lappin, Leighann Sherry, Petrina Sweeney, Craig Williams, Jeremy Bagg, and Shauna Culshaw. “Antifungal, Cytotoxic, and Immunomodulatory Properties of Tea Tree Oil and Its Derivative Components: Potential Role in Management of Oral Candidosis in Cancer Patients.” Frontiers in Microbiology 3 (2012): 220. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2012.00220.

32 Schelz, Zsuzsanna, Joseph Molnar, and Judit Hohmann. “Antimicrobial and Antiplasmid Activities of Essential Oils.” Fitoterapia 77, no. 4 (June 2006): 279–85. doi:10.1016/j.fitote.2006.03.013. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16690225

33 Comin, Vanessa M., Leonardo Q. S. Lopes, Priscilla M. Quatrin, Márcia E. de Souza, Pauline C. Bonez, Francieli G. Pintos, Renata P. Raffin, Rodrigo de A. Vaucher, Diego S. T. Martinez, and Roberto C. V. Santos. “Influence of Melaleuca Alternifolia Oil Nanoparticles on Aspects of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilm.” Microbial Pathogenesis 93 (April 2016): 120–25. doi:10.1016/j.micpath.2016.01.019. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26821356

34 Shin, Seungwon. “Anti-Aspergillus Activities of Plant Essential Oils and Their Combination Effects with Ketoconazole or Amphotericin B.” Archives of Pharmacal Research 26, no. 5 (May 2003): 389–93. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12785735

35 Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai, Sharyn Gaskin, Michael Taylor, and Dino Pisaniello. “An Evaluation of Antifungal Agents for the Treatment of Fungal Contamination in Indoor Air Environments.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12, no. 6 (June 2015): 6319–32. doi:10.3390/ijerph120606319. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26042369

36 Furneri, Pio Maria, Donatella Paolino, Antonella Saija, Andrena Marino, and Giuseppe Bisignano. “In Vitro Antimycoplasmal Activity of Melaleuca Alternifolia Essential Oil.” Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 58, no. 3 (September 1, 2006): 706–7. doi:10.1093/jac/dkl269. http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/content/58/3/706.full

37 Tsao, N., C.-F. Kuo, H.-Y. Lei, S.-L. Lu, and K.-J. Huang. “Inhibition of Group A Streptococcal Infection by Melaleuca Alternifolia (tea Tree) Oil Concentrate in the Murine Model.” Journal of Applied Microbiology 108, no. 3 (March 2010): 936–44. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2672.2009.04487.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19709334

38 Terzi, V., C. Morcia, P. Faccioli, G. Valè, G. Tacconi, and M. Malnati. “In Vitro Antifungal Activity of the Tea Tree (Melaleuca Alternifolia) Essential Oil and Its Major Components against Plant Pathogens.” Letters in Applied Microbiology 44, no. 6 (June 2007): 613–18. doi:10.1111/j.1472-765X.2007.02128.x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17576222

39 La Torre, A., F. Caradonia, M. Gianferro, M. G. Molinu, and V. Battaglia. “ACTIVITY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS AGAINST SOME PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI.” Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences 79, no. 3 (2014): 439–49. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26080478

40 Nogueira, M. N. M., S. G. Aquino, C. Rossa Junior, and D. M. P. Spolidorio. “Terpinen-4-Ol and Alpha-Terpineol (tea Tree Oil Components) Inhibit the Production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 on Human Macrophages.” Inflammation Research: Official Journal of the European Histamine Research Society … [et Al.] 63, no. 9 (September 2014): 769–78. doi:10.1007/s00011-014-0749-x. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24947163

41 Caldefie-Chézet, F., C. Fusillier, T. Jarde, H. Laroye, M. Damez, M.-P. Vasson, and J. Guillot. “Potential Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Melaleuca Alternifolia Essential Oil on Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.” Phytotherapy Research: PTR 20, no. 5 (May 2006): 364–70. doi:10.1002/ptr.1862. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16619364

42 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety p. 1495.502-1503

43 Tisserand, Robert, and Rodney Young. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013. pp. 1502-1503

44 Szweda, Piotr, Katarzyna Gucwa, Ewelina Kurzyk, Ewa Romanowska, Katarzyna Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Anna Zielińska Jurek, Piotr Marek Kuś, and Sławomir Milewski. “Essential Oils, Silver Nanoparticles and Propolis as Alternative Agents Against Fluconazole Resistant Candida Albicans, Candida Glabrata and Candida Krusei Clinical Isolates.” Indian Journal of Microbiology 55, no. 2 (June 2015): 175–83. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12088-014-0508-2.

45 Giongo, Janice Luehring, Rodrigo de Almeida Vaucher, Viviane Pedroso Fausto, Priscilla Maciel Quatrin, Leonardo Quintana Soares Lopes, Roberto Christ Vianna Santos, André Gündel, Patrícia Gomes, and Martin Steppe. “Anti-Candida Activity Assessment of Pelargonium Graveolens Oil Free and Nanoemulsion in Biofilm Formation in Hospital Medical Supplies.” Microbial Pathogenesis 100 (November 2016): 170–78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2016.08.013.

46 Giongo, Janice Luehring, Rodrigo de Almeida Vaucher, Michele Rorato Sagrillo, Roberto Christ Vianna Santos, Marta M. M. F. Duarte, Vírginia Cielo Rech, Leonardo Quintana Soares Lopes, et al. “Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Geranium Nanoemulsion Macrophages Induced with Soluble Protein of Candida Albicans.” Microbial Pathogenesis 110 (September 2017): 694–702. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2017.01.056.

47 Kobayashi, Yuko, Harumi Sato, Mika Yorita, Hiroto Nakayama, Hironari Miyazato, Keiichiro Sugimoto, and Tomoko Jippo. “Inhibitory Effects of Geranium Essential Oil and Its Major Component, Citronellol, on Degranulation and Cytokine Production by Mast Cells.” Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry 80, no. 6 (June 2016): 1172–78. https://doi.org/10.1080/09168451.2016.1148573.

48 Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals. Second Ed. London, Churchill Livingstone, p. 1032.

49 Massa, N., S. Cantamessa, G. Novello, E. Ranzato, S. Martinotti, M. Pavan, A. Rocchetti, G. Berta, E. Gamalero, and E. Bona. “Antifungal Activity of Essential Oils against Azole-Resistant and Azole-Susceptible Vaginal Candida Glabrata Strains.” Canadian Journal of Microbiology, May 10, 2018, 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjm-2018-0082.

50 Sharifzadeh, Aghil, Ali Reza Khosravi, and Shahin Ahmadian. “Chemical Composition and Antifungal Activity of Satureja Hortensis L. Essentiall Oil against Planktonic and Biofilm Growth of Candida Albicans Isolates from Buccal Lesions of HIV(+) Individuals.” Microbial Pathogenesis 96 (July 2016): 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2016.04.014.

51 Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals. Second Ed. London, Churchill Livingstone, pp 1444 – 1445.

52 Szweda, Piotr, Katarzyna Gucwa, Ewelina Kurzyk, Ewa Romanowska, Katarzyna Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Anna Zielińska Jurek, Piotr Marek Kuś, and Sławomir Milewski. “Essential Oils, Silver Nanoparticles and Propolis as Alternative Agents Against Fluconazole Resistant Candida Albicans, Candida Glabrata and Candida Krusei Clinical Isolates.” Indian Journal of Microbiology 55, no. 2 (June 2015): 175–83. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12088-014-0508-2.

53 Oliveira, Sarah Almeida Coelho, Jéssica Rabelo Mina Zambrana, Fernanda Bispo Reis Di Iorio, Cristiane Aparecida Pereira, and Antonio Olavo Cardoso Jorge. “The Antimicrobial Effects of Citrus Limonum and Citrus Aurantium Essential Oils on Multi-Species Biofilms.” Brazilian Oral Research 28 (2014): 22–27.

54 Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Healthcare Professionals. Second Ed. London, Churchill Livingstone, p 1153.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Puffer_Fish.jpg

May 1 18

Chronic Lyme Summit 3 Free! Talks by over Thirty Lyme Experts – for a Limited Time

by Greg
Want to hear the wisdom of over thirty Lyme experts share
their best remedies and treatments?
The Chronic Lyme Summit 3 will be broadcast online today for Free
for a limited number of days.So click on the link below to get the goodies from multiple
Lyme disease experts (including me):
Thanks,
Greg
P.S.  You can also receive my free downloads on
1. Essential Oils for Lyme disease and the
2. GoodbyeLyme Healing Blueprint sent
directly to your inbox by clicking here:
Apr 27 18

Chronic Lyme Summit 3 2018 Interview with Greg Lee

by Greg

Welcome Chronic Lyme Summit 3 Listeners!

Here’s How to Get Your Free Copy of the GoodbyeLyme Healing Blueprint and the Essential Oils for Lyme Disease Handout as talked about in the Greg Lee Interview. 

Click on the button below so we can send you the free download link to the blueprint and the essential oils handout which goes into greater depth on the interview topics. Please answer a few questions while we get your handout ready.


 

Thanks again for listening to the interview with Greg Lee on the “GoodbyeLyme Treatments and Remedies for Chronic Lyme Symptoms.”
________________________________________________

When you click the button above you’ll be taken to a form where you can enter your contact information for where you want your presentation delivered.

You’ll then receive a confirmation email.

In short:

1. We will never send you spam
2. We will not sell or give away your e-mail address
3. We will work diligently to defend your privacy
I want you to know that your email is safe with me

I will never share your email with anyone, for any reason.

You will also receive a free subscription to our GoodbyeLyme Newsletter.
You will receive articles, resources, and hear about events to help you to heal from Lyme disease and chronic co-infections. We do not share your information with anyone for any reason.

The newsletter comes out a few times a month, and I also send out reminders of offers, workshops, and programs.

Best regards,

Greg Lee

 

DISCLAIMER:

The medical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education, does not create any patient-practitioner relationship, and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.

Please consult your health care provider, or contact the Two Frogs Healing Center for an appointment, before making any healthcare decisions or for guidance about a specific medical condition. The Two Frogs Healing Center expressly disclaims responsibility, and shall have no liability, for any damages, loss, injury, or liability whatsoever suffered as a result of your reliance on the information contained in this site. The Two Frogs Healing Center does not endorse specifically any test, treatment, or procedure mentioned on the site.

By visiting this site you agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, which may from time to time be changed or supplemented by the Two Frogs Healing Center. If you do not agree to the foregoing terms and conditions, you should not enter this site.

Apr 27 18

Essential Oils for Stopping Persistent Lyme Disease Training May 18th – June 22nd

by Greg

Here is your secret registration page for the Essential Oils for Stopping Persistent Lyme Disease Training…

How to stop recurring Lyme disease symptoms in your clients

(Learn what else besides medications and supplements helps your Lyme disease clients to get better–and how the right tools stop recurring symptoms from coming back)

This course will cover:

  • The unique “signature” symptoms which helps you to differentiate between Lyme disease and other infections
  • A simple Chinese medicine system for making sense of and treating a confusing array of Lyme disease symptoms
  • Which essential oils help to detoxify and to stop persistent infections
  • Which essential oils help to heal Leaky Gut which is a common obstacle to healing in Lyme patients
  • How to make liposomal essential oils to evict germs hiding inside cells using herbs and other supplements
  • How to use laser delivered essential oils to relieve stubborn Lyme symptoms, and much more…

 

Where: This is a six week ONLINE Training

When: This course will offer six one-hour-long live trainings from 3pm – 4pm EST every Friday starting on May 18th, 2018 at ending on Friday June 22nd. All trainings are 60 minutes.

Who: This course is for medical providers that are treating Lyme patients. If you are in a state that does not license your profession, then you are eligible to take this training. Course participants must agree to follow their local, state and national laws for practicing medicine before participating.

How you get access: You will be on your computer / tablet for the webinar or dialing a US number for audio only.
Note: You will receive a separate email with your webinar link, and dial-in number and code.

What does it cost? $3260 $1497 which is a special 45% Integrative Medicine Conference savings off all the entire program and bonuses combined. This course will not be offered at this low price again. After May 4th the price will go up.




Is it just a seminar? Will there be notes? What about the training recordings? This is an online training. And yes, you will also get pdf seminar notes, mindmaps, and bonus videos too. These are sent to you over email so you can come familiarize yourself with the material between webinars. This creates a high level of creative discussion, problem solving, and patient case analysis.

There will be recordings of each training that will be available for download in case you miss a live meeting.

Your role: Be kind, collaborative, and professional, or be gone. You will also be asked to give feedback, provide suggestions, or make helpful modifications to the materials so they can better solve the problems that are coming up in your practice. We all have different learning styles and I will work hard with you at developing materials in different formats to help you learn more effectively.

Are there CEUs? Graduates of the course will receive 6 CE credits from the Oregon Board of Naturopathic Medicine.

Do I get any other support? Yes. You get Greg’s email where you can ask all your questions during the six weeks of the course.

Is there a guarantee? Yes indeed. All our products and services are guaranteed. If before this course starts, you find that this is not what you expected simply email me, we’ll be happy to give you your money back minus a $50 registration fee.  Please give us as much notice as possible so we can open up your space up to another participant.

Important: There will be no refunds given on or after Friday May 18th which is the first day of the seminar.

Have you taught this before? For the past seven years, this seminar has always been given as a combination of live / online training course. The most effective remedies and treatments that have helped hundreds of patients have been taught in previous seminars. Given the numerous requests from practitioners for online training and patients saying that more medical providers need training on Lyme, which is why I am offering this course material online.

This course will be highly interactive and as you share what is working for your patients and practice, we will work with you to adjust the materials accordingly. 

  • It’s designed to maximize your time and money by guiding you quickly through your challenges with complex clients
  • It’s structured to be flexible and responsive to your needs
  • You always have the support of the lead instructor and an assistant to support your learning and applying the course material
  • The course is a short six weeks which gives you a limited, highly focused learning environment
  • Your feedback is essential to helping you get the materials you need to help your Lyme patients
  • After course support is available through a closed confidential online group.

Here is the agenda for the course:


Week 1: Assess the underlying factors in your Lyme disease clients

  • Learn how to make sense of a confusing array of Lyme disease symptoms
  • Understand why Lyme patients keep having relapsing pain, fatigue, and mental fog despite your best treatments and remedies
  • Learn about Lyme disease toxins and their “Herxheimer” effects on patients physical body, emotions, and mind
  • Learn about the most common co-infections that can mimic Lyme disease
  • Understand the different ways these infections play “hide and go seek” and why that produces relapsing symptoms
  • Learn about the unique “signature” symptoms which helps you to differentiate between Lyme disease and other infections
  • Understand how to make sense of western diagnostic terms and how to use them to help your patients
  • Case study D

Week 2: Learn how a 2000 year old Chinese medicine strategy unravels complex symptoms in Lyme patients

  • Learn the Chinese medicine diagnoses for Lyme and the accompanying co-infections
  • Understand why the Gu Syndrome approach is a “Game Changer” in treating highly toxic Lyme patients
  • Understand the modern updates to Gu Syndrome remedies which help address persistent Lyme symptoms
  • Learn about different essential oil treatments for Lyme
  • Understand which essential oils are for treating co-infections
  • Learn how to use pulse diagnosis an intuition to customize oils for each patient
  • Case study N

Week 3: Detoxification and how it supports the immune system

  • Learn how multiple methods for detoxifying can help to stop persistent symptoms
  • Understand how to use essential oils for detoxification
  • Learn about oils for replenishing the immune system, blood, Qi, Yin, Yang
  • Case study M

Week 4: Healing Leaky Gut and rebuilding the digestion system

  • Learn what is Leaky Gut and how it shows up in your Lyme patients
  • Understand which essential oils remedies help clear intestinal pathogens and effective delivery methods
  • Learn which essential oils help to heal Leaky Gut
  • Understand ways of using essential oils for reducing inflammation
  • Case study D

Week 5: Using liposomal essential oils for stopping Lyme disease and co-infection symptoms

  • How to make liposomal remedies using essential oils
  • How liposomal essential oils help to deeply clean infectious out of their reservoirs to prevent symptom relapse
  • Learn which oils help you to cut through biofilms and get to lurking pathogens
  • Learn which supplements dramatically increase the anti-microbial properties of your liposomal essential oils
  • Case study L

Week 6: Cold laser delivered essential oils and emotional healing properties of different oils

  • How you can use a cold laser to deliver the healing frequencies of essential oils to stop chronic symptoms
  • Learn which essential oils help to root out and transform the underlying causes of painful emotions
  • How to get ongoing support and guidance in your practice through a confidential online group
  • Case study I

BONUS #1 (First five practitioners to register) Get a 1-on-1 phone/Skype consultation with Greg on the most
effective remedies and treatments for successfully healing your Lyme disease patients ($400 value)

BONUS #2 (First ten practitioners to register) Receive a hand-held laser + essential oil kit for quickly
relieving stubborn Lyme disease symptoms of pain, brain fog, and toxicity. This is the same laser
that we use in the treatment room with kids, chemically sensitive patients to relieve their relapsing
pain and neurological symptoms ($100 value)

BONUS #3 Twelve months of access to a confidential Facebook Group of Lyme literate medical providers
to get answers to your most burning questions and to get the latest remedies and treatments ($360 value)

 

 

Here is Where to Sign Up for the Essential Oils for
Stopping Persistent Lyme Disease Online Training

Essential Oils for Stopping Persistent Lyme Disease Online Training

Friday May 18th, 2018 – June 22nd, 2018

Seminar Materials
Regular
Six Weekly Training Videos ($2400)
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Course Powerpoint Handouts ($60)
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Bonuses
5 Must Have Remedies for Lyme Video ($400)
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Disrupting Biofilms Report ($20)
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Mindmaps, Checklists ($50)
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Big Bonuses
One-on-one coaching session with Greg ($400) (First five to register)
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Cold laser + Essential Oil Healing Kit for persistent symptoms ($100) (First ten to register)
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Year of access to a confidential Facebook Group of Lyme practitioners  ($360)  checkmarkcheckmark
On-time tuition (which includes a $50 non-refundable registration fee)
$1497

Payment Options

credit cards

Registration $3790
$1497 Single Payment via Paypal or Credit Card



>>>

Is your practice needing a new way to help people who have complex illnesses like Lyme disease? Or do you want to your clients to waste precious time searching for someone else who can help them?

Tell us what you want to learn and we’ll enhance how you help your clients forever.

Warm regards,

Greg Lee

P.S. Everyday you see people with complex illnesses that need tremendous support. These essential oil remedies and treatments will enhance the powerful healing services for helping the clients you’ve always wanted to.

Concerns? Questions? If you have any concerns, please email me directly at TwoFrogsHealingCenter@gmail.com and let me know how I can help. If there’s anything I can do, I will. I’d be interested in getting your feedback. The feedback that you give me, is strictly confidential.

Mar 23 18

2018 Better Health Guy Interview Slides with Greg Lee Free Download

by Greg

Better Health Guy Interview on March 23rd, 2018

I hope you learned something
new in my interview with Scott
the 
Better Health Guy.

 

You’ll also receive a free copy of our
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Warmly,

Greg Lee
Creator of the GoodbyeLyme
System for Stopping Persistent
Lyme Disease

Feb 5 18

Learn which essential oils kill persistent Lyme Disease in research studies on Wednesday February 7th at 6pm at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc (FITCI)

by Greg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Two Frogs Healing Center to share five must-have essential oils for treating Lyme disease at the Essential Oils+ for Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Talk on Wednesday February 7th at 6pm at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc. (FITCI)

Frederick, Maryland, Monday February 5th, 2018 – Two Frogs Healing Center, a natural treatment clinic for getting rid of persistent tick infections like Lyme disease, will be hosting the Essential Oils+ for Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Evening Lecture on Wednesday February 7th from 6pm – 9pm at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc. (FITCI)

Lyme Disease is the number one vector borne illness in the US and in the US armed forces. Lyme Disease bacteria have developed multiple methods to become resistant to antibiotic treatment. These methods are believed to be the cause of relapsing symptoms of fatigue, brain fog, inflammation, and pain in chronic Lyme disease patients despite months or years of antibiotics. Fortunately, research has identified five essential oils that kill drug persistent Lyme disease bacteria.

At our clinic, we have successfully treated hundreds of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease and multiple tick borne co-infections. At the “Essential Oils+ for Getting Rid of Lyme Disease” lecture we’ll also be sharing how innovative treatments like Frequency Specific Microcurrent and which microparticle aka “Liposomal” herbs enhance the anti-Lyme effects of essential oils.

“Essential oils have the unique ability to penetrate through biofilms to get rid hidden forms of Lyme disease and co-infections,” – Greg Lee, President Two Frogs Healing Center. He will be sharing about the huge improvements that patients have received through essential oils and other treatments at the Essential Oils+ for Getting Rid of Lyme Disease talk on Wednesday February 7th.

About the Two Frogs Healing Center
The Two Frogs Healing Center has been a provider of natural remedies and treatments for helping patients to stop their persistent infections including Lyme disease, viruses, mold, bacteria, and parasites. Using advanced electrical scanning technology, we are is able to identify the signatures of underlying pathogens that are causing relapsing symptoms. 

 
Two Frogs also produces targeted, customized, natural remedies to address multiple chronic infections, toxins, and painful symptoms.  Its treatments and remedies encompass Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cold laser, acupuncture, cupping and bloodletting, craniosacral therapy, targeted liposomal remedies, essential oils, homeopathic remedies, antimicrobial herbs, and detoxification supplements. The Two Frogs Healing Center has served the Lyme disease community since 2006 and has a clinic in the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc. For more information or to register, visit www.GoodbyeLyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme.
http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/02/prweb15164203.htm
Jan 7 18

Five Essential Oils for Fighting a Persistent Mycoplasma Infection

by Greg

steaks

I once asked my mom for her secret recipe for barbeque steak. I would savor each bite as it filled my mouth with delicious flavor. I started salivating when I read her well-worn 3×5 card with the list of ingredients: steak, garlic (lots!), sugar, soy sauce, spring onions, rice wine, pepper, sesame seeds, and sesame oil. I felt like I discovered her hidden secret for flavor when I read: “poke holes in the meat with a fork and marinade overnight in the refrigerator.”

How can knowing about marinades help you to fight a persistent mycoplasma infection?

Mycoplasma infections can be found throughout into the body
Mycoplasmas are very small bacteria that can spread throughout the body and have been found especially in the lungs and heart1, central nervous system2, and the blood3. Mycoplasma infections have been linked to illnesses including: multiple sclerosis4, cancer5, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia6, arthritis and hepatitus7. Patients report a wide range of symptoms including: respiratory tract infections, fever, chest pain, neurological problems, meningitis, encephalitis, and hemolytic anemia. These symptoms may persist despite antibiotic treatment because mycoplasma can develop drug resistance.

Antibiotic resistant mycoplasma infections are being found across the world
In multiple studies, macrolide or tetracycline antibiotic resistant mycoplasma have been found in North America8, Asia9,10, and Europe11. These germs can also form biofilms12, which can increase drug resistance up to five-thousand fold13. In addition to developing drug resistance, these germs can also hide inside cells14 which makes killing them much more challenging.

What else besides antibiotics can help you fight a persistent biofilm and intracellular mycoplasma infection?

Essential oils may help you fight a persistent mycoplasma infection
Fortunately, there are five essential oils that have anti-mycoplasma properties. These oils have been effective against multiple mycoplasma species. When these oils are formulated into a microparticle called a liposome, they may have a greater ability to penetrate deeper into biofilms and inside cells and kill mycoplasma in their hiding places. Fortunately, these essential oils have been used safely for decades for food preservation and in therapeutic treatments topically and internally.

Anti-Mycoplasma Essential Oil #1: Bergamot orange, Citrus Bergamia
The properties of this essential oil are cooling, refreshing, and astringent. It is recognized by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS)15. However, bergamot essential oils that contain furanocoumarins are phototoxic potentially carcinogenic, and can lead to blistering if exposed to UV light or sunlight after being applied to the skin topically. Fortunately, there are furanocoumarin-free oils, labelled as bergamot essential oil (FCF) which are non-toxic16.

In one experiment, bergamot essential oil and its major components (limonene, linalyl acetate and linalool were tested against forty-two strains of Mycoplasma hominis, two strains of Mycoplasma fermentans, and one strain of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. All strains were inhibited at 0.5% (M. hominis and M. pneumonia) to 1% (M. fermentans) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels by bergamot essential oil. Linalyl acetate was highly effective against M. hominis and M. pneumonia with MIC levels of 0.015% and M. fermentan at MIC levels of 0.12%. Linalool had MIC values of 0.015% against M. pneumoniae, 0.06% MIC levels against M. fermentans, and 1% MIC levels against M. hominis. Limonene had MIC levels of 0.03% against M. pneumoniae, 1% against M. fermentans, and >4% against M. hominis17.

In other experiments, liposomal bergamot essential oil demonstrated anti-cancer properties18, the essential oil modulates intracellular calcium levels19, vaporized bergamot and orange essential oils remove methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. (VRE) and their biofilms20, lavender and bergamot essential oil mixture helps to reduce anxiety and depression21, and bergamot essential oil has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects22. Another essential oil derived from tea tree also has anti-mycoplasma properties.

Anti-Mycoplasma Essential Oil #2: Tea tree, Melaleuca alternifolia
The properties of this essential oil are warming and fragrant. High doses, approximately a teaspoon to a half a teacup, of tea tree oil have resulted in ataxia, drowsiness, diarrhea, unconsciousness, and allergic reactions. Maximum topical dose is 15% when combined with other essential oils or carrier oils23.

In two studies, tea tree essential oil demonstrated anti-mycoplasma effects at very low concentrations. Against M. pneumoniae, MIC was 0.006% for the wild type and 0.003% against mutant strains24. In the second study, M. pneumoniae showed MIC values of 0.01%, M. fermentans, showed MIC values of 0.06%, and M. hominis was 0.12%25.

In other studies, tea tree has been effective against drug resistant MRSA, streptococcus, and candida26, reducing inflammation and stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokines27, and preventing influenza28. A combination of essential oils also demonstrated anti-mycoplasma properties in an animal study.

Anti-Mycoplasma Essential Oils #3: Peppermint, Mentha piperita combined with #4 Eucalyptus, species
The properties of peppermint essential oil are cooling, releases the exterior, and pungent. It is recognized by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS)29. However, massive doses of peppermint essential oils, 4g/kg, produce neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, convulsions, and paralysis in animal studies30.

In one animal study, a commercial combination of peppermint and eucalyptus essential oils (Mentofin) helped to reduce the effects of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum and H9N2 infection in chickens by reducing mucus production and levels of intracellular infection³¹. In laboratory studies, peppermint essential oil combined with beta-lactam antibiotics reduces antibiotic resistance in drug resistant E. coli³², demonstrated moderate antibacterial activity against: Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella enterica, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa³³, inhibits candida and it’s biofilms³⁴., and peppermint combined with spearmint essential oil reduces chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting³⁵. Peppermint essential oil use is contraindicated in cases of cardiac fibrillation and in patients with a G6PD (Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase) deficiency.

Anti-Mycoplasma Essential oil #4 Eucalyptus, spp
The properties of eucalyptus essential oil are cooling, disperses wind, and releases the exterior. This essential oil is contraindicated in patients with inflammatory disease in their gastro-intestinal tract and bile ducts, and in cases with severe liver disease³⁶. Multiple cases of acute toxicity have been reported in adults and children after ingesting 5 ml to 75 ml with signs of central nervous system depression, abnormal respiration, and pinpoint pupils. Other symptoms of acute toxicity may include: stomach pain, vomiting, weak legs, cold sweats, headaches, and even death.

In laboratory and animal tests, eucalyptus essential oil demonstrated anti-bacterial activity against E. coli³⁷, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae³⁸, Streptococcus mutans³⁹, Candida albicans⁴⁰, and reduces inflammation⁴¹. In addition to peppermint and eucalyptus, cinnamon oil was also effective at inhibiting mycoplasma.

Anti-Mycoplasma Essential Oil #5 Cinnamon bark
The properties of cinnamon essential oil are hot and sweet. It is recognized by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS)⁴². In a lab study, cinnamon bark essential oil had antimicrobial activity against fifty clinical isolates of Mycoplasma hominis⁴³. In multiple lab studies, cinnamon bark essential oil has also been effective against drug persistent Lyme disease and it’s biofilms⁴⁴, drug-resistant Candida⁴⁵, Brucella abortus⁴⁶, and Aspergillus mold species and it’s toxins⁴⁷. In another lab study, liposomal cinnamon bark essential oil was effective at inhibiting drug resistant staphylococcus (MRSA) and it’s biofilms⁴⁸.

Caution: cinnamon oil has produced allergic dermatitis in some cases when placed on the skin. This oil may interfere with blood clotting. In one case, a boy drank 60 ml of cinnamon oil upon a dare and experienced symptoms of burning sensation in the mouth, chest and stomach, dizziness, double vision, nausea, vomiting and later collapsed. Microparticle essential oils may help enhance the fight against persistent mycoplasma symptoms.

Patients with mycoplasma report a significant reduction of chronic symptoms
After taking internal doses of microparticle “liposomal” essential oil mixtures containing one or more of the oils above, several patients have reported significant reduction in muscular and joint pain, headaches, insomnia, inflammation, fatigue, and mental fog, and confusion. In some cases, symptoms were aggravated due to a toxic die off Herxheimer reaction. Using essential oils in a careful, targeted strategy may help to reduce persistent mycoplasma symptoms.

The right essential oils can help you to fight off a persistent mycoplasma infection
Just like the right marinade, the proper anti-mycoplasma essential oils in a microparticle liposome may penetrate deeper into cells, under biofilms, and into the brain where mycoplasmas can cause troubling symptoms. These oils may help to significantly reduce the persistent pain, fatigue, and mental fog caused by these germs. Since these oils come with cautions and contraindications on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a safe and effective essential oil strategy for your condition.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where treatment or remedies helped you eliminate or reduce inflammation and fatigue from a mycoplasma infection? Tell us about it.

>> Next step: Come to our live evening lecture: Getting Rid of Lyme Disease in Frederick, Maryland on Monday January 8th at 6pm to learn more about treatments and remedies for stopping treatment resistant mycoplasma, Lyme disease, drug resistant infections, neurological problems, inflammation, and pain: http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme


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18. Celia C, Trapasso E, Locatelli M, Navarra M, Ventura CA, Wolfram J, Carafa M, Morittu VM, Britti D, Di Marzio L, Paolino D. Anticancer activity of liposomal bergamot essential oil (BEO) on human neuroblastoma cells. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces. 2013 Dec 1;112:548-53. doi: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2013.09.017. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24099646
19. You JH, Kang P, Min SS, Seol GH. Bergamot essential oil differentially modulates intracellular Ca2+ levels in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells: a new finding seen with fura-2. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2013 Apr;61(4):324-8. doi: 10.1097/FJC.0b013e3182834681. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23288200
20. Laird K, Armitage D, Phillips C. Reduction of surface contamination and biofilms of Enterococcus sp. and Staphylococcus aureus using a citrus-based vapour. J Hosp Infect. 2012 Jan;80(1):61-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2011.04.008. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22153952
21. Hongratanaworakit T. Aroma-therapeutic effects of massage blended essential oils on humans. Nat Prod Commun. 2011 Aug;6(8):1199-204. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21922934
22. Trombetta D, Cimino F, Cristani M, Mandalari G, Saija A, Ginestra G, Speciale A, Chirafisi J, Bisignano G, Waldron K, Narbad A, Faulds CB. J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Jul 28;58(14):8430-6. doi: 10.1021/jf1008605. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20578719
23. Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety. pp. 440-445.
24. Harkenthal M, Layh-Schmitt G, Reichling J. Effect of Australian tea tree oil on the viability of the wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Pharmazie. 2000 May;55(5):380-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11828621
25. Furneri PM, Paolino D, Saija A, Marino A, Bisignano G. In vitro antimycoplasmal activity of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2006 Sep;58(3):706-7. Epub 2006 Jun 20. http://jac.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16787951
26. Warnke PH, Becker ST, Podschun R, Sivananthan S, Springer IN, Russo PA, Wiltfang J, Fickenscher H, Sherry E. The battle against multi-resistant strains: Renaissance of antimicrobial essential oils as a promising force to fight hospital-acquired infections. J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2009 Oct;37(7):392-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jcms.2009.03.017. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19473851
27. Taga I, Lan CQ, Altosaar I. Plant essential oils and mastitis disease: their potential inhibitory effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to bacteria related inflammation. Nat Prod Commun. 2012 May;7(5):675-82. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22799106
28. Li X, Duan S, Chu C, Xu J, Zeng G, Lam AK, Zhou J, Yin Y, Fang D, Reynolds MJ, Gu H, Jiang L. Melaleuca alternifolia concentrate inhibits in vitro entry of influenza virus into host cells. Molecules. 2013 Aug 9;18(8):9550-66. doi: 10.3390/molecules18089550. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23966077
29. US Food and Drug Adminstration CFR Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Vol. 3.
30. Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Ed. pp. 387-390.

31. Barbour, E., El-Hakim, R., Kaadi, M., Shaib, H., Gerges, D., Nehme, P. Evaluation of the Histopathology of the Respiratory System in Essential Oil-Treated Broilers Following a Challenge With Mycoplasma gallisepticum and/or H9N2 Influenza Virus. http://www.jarvm.com/articles/Vol4Iss4/Barbour.pdf

32. Yap PS, Lim SH, Hu CP, Yiap BC. Combination of essential oils and antibiotics reduce antibiotic resistance in plasmid-conferred multidrug resistant bacteria. Phytomedicine. 2013 Jun 15;20(8-9):710-3. doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2013.02.013. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23537749
33. Silva N, Alves S, Gonçalves A, Amaral JS, Poeta P. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils from mediterranean aromatic plants against several foodborne and spoilage bacteria. Food Sci Technol Int. 2013 Dec;19(6):503-10. doi: 10.1177/1082013212442198. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23444311
34. Saharkhiz MJ, Motamedi M, Zomorodian K, Pakshir K, Miri R, Hemyari K. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Antibiofilm Activities of the Essential Oil of Mentha piperita L. ISRN Pharm. 2012;2012:718645. doi: 10.5402/2012/718645. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23304561
35. Tayarani-Najaran Z, Talasaz-Firoozi E, Nasiri R, Jalali N, Hassanzadeh M. Antiemetic activity of volatile oil from Mentha spicata and Mentha × piperita in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Ecancermedicalscience. 2013;7:290. doi: 10.3332/ecancer.2013.290. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23390455
36. Tisserand, R. and Young. R. Essential Oil Safety, 2nd Ed. pp. 272-275.
37. Bachir RG, Benali M. Antibacterial activity of the essential oils from the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed. 2012 Sep;2(9):739-42. doi: 10.1016/S2221-1691(12)60220-2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23570005
38. Warnke PH, Lott AJ, Sherry E, Wiltfang J, Podschun R. The ongoing battle against multi-resistant strains: in-vitro inhibition of hospital-acquired MRSA, VRE, Pseudomonas, ESBL E. coli and Klebsiella species in the presence of plant-derived antiseptic oils. J Craniomaxillofac Surg. 2013 Jun;41(4):321-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jcms.2012.10.012. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23199627
39. Chaudhari LK, Jawale BA, Sharma S, Sharma H, Kumar CD, Kulkarni PA. Antimicrobial activity of commercially available essential oils against Streptococcus mutans. J Contemp Dent Pract. 2012 Jan 1;13(1):71-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22430697
40. Carvalhinho S, Costa AM, Coelho AC, Martins E, Sampaio A. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses. Mycopathologia. 2012 Jul;174(1):69-76. doi: 10.1007/s11046-012-9520-4. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22246961
41. Gbenou JD, Ahounou JF, Akakpo HB, Laleye A, Yayi E, Gbaguidi F, Baba-Moussa L, Darboux R, Dansou P, Moudachirou M, Kotchoni SO. Phytochemical composition of Cymbopogon citratus and Eucalyptus citriodora essential oils and their anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties on Wistar rats. Mol Biol Rep. 2013 Feb;40(2):1127-34. doi: 10.1007/s11033-012-2155-1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2306528 

42. US Food and Drug Adminstration CFR Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Vol. 3.http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=182.20

43. “In Vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Cinnamon Bark Oil, Anethole, Carvacrol, Eugenol and Guaiazulene against Mycoplasma Hominis Clinical Isolates. – PubMed – NCBI.” Accessed January 7, 2018.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23128812.

44. Feng, Jie, Shuo Zhang, Wanliang Shi, Nevena Zubcevik, Judith Miklossy, and Ying
Zhang. “Selective Essential Oils from Spice or Culinary Herbs Have High Activity against
Stationary Phase and Biofilm Borrelia Burgdorferi.” Frontiers in Medicine 4 (2017).
https://doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2017.00169.

45. Soares, I. H., É S. Loreto, L. Rossato, D. N. Mario, T. P. Venturini, F. Baldissera, J. M. Santurio, and S. H. Alves. “In Vitro Activity of Essential Oils Extracted from Condiments against Fluconazole-Resistant and -Sensitive Candida Glabrata.” Journal De Mycologie Médicale 25, no. 3 (September 2015): 213-17.

46. Al-Mariri A, Saour G, Hamou R. In vitro antibacterial effects of five volatile oil extracts against intramacrophage Brucella abortus 544. Iran J Med Sci. 2012 Jun;37(2):119-25. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23115441

47.  Lokman Alpsoy. Inhibitory Effect of Essential Oil on Aflatoxin Activity. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(17), pp. 2474-2481, 19 April, 2010 www.ajol.info/index.php/ajb/article/view/79702/69978

48. Cui, Haiying, Wei Li, Changzhu Li, Saritporn Vittayapadung, and Lin Lin. “Liposome Containing Cinnamon Oil with Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilm.” Biofouling 32, no. 2 (2016): 215–25. doi:10.1080/08927014.2015.1134516. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26838161

 

Nov 3 17

Five Essential Oils for Stopping Relapsing Symptoms Caused by Lyme Disease That Thrives Despite Multiple Antibiotics

by Greg

For people with recurring Lyme disease symptoms that still struggle despite months of several antibiotics

by Greg Lee

Have you heard of the Greek mythical monster called the Hydra? It was a huge serpent with nine poisonous heads. Heracles the Greek divine hero, aka Hercules in Roman mythology, was sent to kill this monster. Whenever Heracles cut off one head, two grew back in it’s place. Heracles was soon overwhelmed by the growing number of serpent heads. Fortunately, his nephew Iolaus used a torch to cauterize the severed stumps before more heads could grow back. No longer swarmed by double serpent heads, Heracles overcame and killed the hydra.

How is a hydra that can keep growing new heads similar to fighting Lyme disease that persists despite antibiotic treatment?

Similar to the mythical hydra, persistent Lyme disease can keep spreading despite blasting it with powerful antibiotics
In lab studies, Lyme disease bacteria can develop persistent forms called round bodies and cysts that are not killed by antibiotics. Lyme bacteria can also produce a slime called “biofilm” which can make infections up to 1000x more drug resistant[1]. Lyme patients with persistent infections can continue to struggle with multiple recurring symptoms.

Lyme disease patients can have recurring, multiple symptoms despite antibiotic treatment
Despite receiving antibiotic therapy, patients diagnosed with Lyme disease have reported recurring symptoms of fatigue, muscular and joint pain, neurological impairment[2], arthritis[3], upper and lower extremity neuropathic pain[4], and dementia[5]. Approximately 10-20% of Lyme patients report recurring symptoms after two to four weeks of antibiotics[6]. One theory for this relapse is that persistent forms of Lyme disease that have survived antibiotic treatment. These bacteria are not stopped by antibiotics and continue to create recurring symptoms. One area where these persistent forms can create problems is in the brain.

Brain samples from Alzheimer’s patients contain persistent forms of Lyme disease
Atypical and cystic forms of Lyme disease in were found in the cerebral cortex region of the brain of patients diagnosed with neurological Lyme[7]. Lyme disease biofilms were also discovered in the the brain tissues of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s[8]. Given the increased drug resistant nature of biofilms and persistent forms of Lyme disease, some Lyme literate medical providers have resorted to using multiple  antibiotics.

Multiple antibiotics are being used to target persistent forms of Lyme disease
In a lab study, Lyme disease persisters were killed more effectively with a combination of three antibiotics: Daptomycin, cefuroxime, and doxycycline[9]. A Lyme literate doctor recommended the use of multiple antibiotics including one called Dapsone for minimum length of seven months or longer[10]. Unfortunately, there can be multiple side effects from prolonged antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease.

Patients can experience multiple side effects from prolonged antibiotic treatment for Lyme
Lyme disease patients receiving oral and intravenous antibiotics have reported different side effects from skin photosensitivity reactions and gastrointestinal symptoms[11], decreased white blood cells, fever, hepatitis, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea[12], meningitis[13], and IV port infections[14]. Lyme patients also report increased digestion issues including leaky gut syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, or toxic die-off aka “Herxheimer” reactions[15] as a result of their antibiotic therapy. In a rare case, prolonged antibiotic treatment has been associated with anemia and kidney damage[16].

Are there natural remedies that can help to reduce recurring symptoms by targeting antibiotic persistent forms of Lyme disease?

Fortunately, there are five essential oils that have been effective against persister forms of Lyme disease
In a recent study, five essential oils: oregano, clove bud, cinnamon bark, citronella, and geranium were more effective at eliminating persister forms of Lyme disease than the antibiotic daptomycin[17]. Many of these essential oils have been used safely for years in our food supply[18] and to help patients with Lyme disease to reduce relapsing symptoms[19]. These oils have multiple healing and infection fighting properties in lab and animal studies. Microparticle “liposome” essential oils have demonstrated greater antimicrobial properties in lab studies[20].

Anti-Lyme Persister Essential Oil #1: Oregano
Oregano essential oil eradicated all Lyme disease persister cells and dissolved biofilms in a lab study[21]. The major antimicrobial components of this oil are carvacrol and thymol[22]. In multiple studies, oregano oil has also been effective against multi-drug resistant E. Coli and it’s biofilms[23], Salmonella species, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, multi-drug resistant Pseudonomas aeruginosa, Candida species, and Aspergillus niger[24]. This oil has the ability to disrupt the “quorum sensing” communication signals that pathogens use to make biofilms in food preservation studies[25], and can inhibit biofilm formation in multiple pathogens[26].

In a pig study, oregano oil increased intestinal barrier integrity, decreased endotoxins, and lower inflammatory compounds[27]. In a mouse study, a combination of oregano and thyme essential oil reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNFalpha and reduce damage to the colon[28].

This essential oil is contraindicated in pregnancy and breast feeding. This oil has anti-coagulant properties and is cautioned with the use of diabetic medications, anticoagulant medications, after major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders. It is also cautioned against using this oil on diseased or damaged, or hypersensitive skin, and with children under 2 years old[29]. In addition to oregano oil, clove bud oil has excellent anti-Lyme properties.

Anti-Lyme Persister Essential Oil #2: Clove Bud
Clove bud essential oil also eradicated all Lyme disease persister cells and biofilms in a lab study[30]. Eugenol is the main antimicrobial ingredient in this oil. In multiple lab studies, clove oil inhibits Salmonella typhimurium, E. coli, B. cereus, Listeria innocua, Morganella morganii, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacteriaceae, S. aureus, and Pseudomonas species[31]. This oil also posses potent antifungal properties against Candida albicans[32] and Aspergillus flavus[33]. In lab studies, clove bud oil attenuates E. coli biofilm production[34].

In another lab study, this oil also inhibits the production of inflammatory compounds IL-1beta and IL-6[35] which are often elevated in patients with Lyme disease[36].

Clove bud oil use is cautioned in pregnancy. This oil has anti-coagulant properties and is cautioned with the use of diabetic medications, anticoagulant medications, after major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders. It may interact with pethidine, MAOIs or SSRIs. It is also cautioned against using this oil on diseased or damaged, or hypersensitive skin, and with children under 2 years old This oil has US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status[37]. Similar to clove bud oil, cinnamon bark has excellent anti-Lyme properties.

Anti-Lyme Persister Essential Oil #3: Cinnamon Bark
In a lab study, cinnamon bark essential oil eradicated all Lyme disease persister cells and biofilms[38]. The main active compounds in cinnamon bark oil are cinnamaldehyde and eugenol[39]. Cinnamon bark oil also inhibits methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and it’s biofilms, Aspergillus ochraceus, Fusarium moniliforme[40], Brucella abortus[41], multidrug resistant Pseudonomas aeruginosa[42], and Candida albicans and it’s biofilms[43].

In a human skin lab study, cinnamon bark oil reduced inflammatory compounds matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)[44]. PAI-1 is often elevated and slows the recovery in Lyme patients by creating a condition called hypercoagulation or thick blood[45]. When encapsulated into a microparticle liposome, cinnamon bark oil was more stable and was effective longer against MRSA and it’s biofilms[46].

Cinnamon bark oil is contraindicated in pregnancy and breast feeding. This oil has anti-coagulant properties and is cautioned with the use of diabetic medications, anticoagulant medications, after major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders. It has a high risk of skin sensitization, is also strongly cautioned against using this oil on diseased or damaged, or hypersensitive skin. This oil has FDA GRAS status[47]. Similar to cinnamon, citronella has anti-Lyme properties.

Anti-Lyme Persister Essential Oil #4: Citronella
In a lab study, citronella essential oil was partially effective against Lyme disease persister cells in a 21-day experiment[48]. The main active component in citronella oil is citronellal[49]. In lab experiments, citronella oil demonstrates excellent antifungal properties against Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus Penicillium species[50], Candida albicans and it’s biofilms[51]. In a diabetes wound study on mice, citronella oil inhibited Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis and decreased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin 1β (IL-1β)[52].

Caution: citronella oil may interact with drugs metabolized by CYP2B6, which include alfentanil, methadone, and propofol. This oil has FDA GRAS status[53]. Just like citronella, geranium reduced persistent forms of Lyme disease.

Anti-Lyme Persister Essential Oil #5: Geranium Bourbon
In a lab study, geranium essential oil was partially effective against Lyme disease persister cells in a 21-day experiment[54]. The main active ingredients in this oil are citronellol and geraniol[55]. In a lab study, geranium bourbon oil was effective at inhibiting Staphylococcus aureus[56], multi-drug resistant S. Aureus and MRSA[57]. Geranium oil had an antibiotic effect against Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus in another lab study[58].

This oil was also effective at reducing inflammatory compounds Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-1, (IL-1), Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels and increased anti-inflammatory Interleukin-10 (IL-10) caused by Candida albicans in a lab study[59]. This oil is cautioned with the use of diabetes medications, and drugs metabolized by CYP2B6, which include alfentanil, methadone, and propofol. This oil has FDA GRAS status[60]. These essential oils in combination may help to reduce relapsing symptoms caused by persistent forms of Lyme disease.

Essential oils may help to reduce recurring symptoms caused by antibiotic persister forms of Lyme disease
Similar to cauterizing the severed heads of the mythic Hydra monster so they don’t grow back, a powerful combination of essential oils may help you to overcome persister forms of Lyme disease that are not killed by antibiotics. Formulating these remedies into microparticle liposomes may enhance the stability and extend their antimicrobial activity of these essential oils. Since these essential oils have cautions and contraindications on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective essential oil formulation for your condition.

– Greg

P.S. Do you have experiences where treatment or remedies helped you reduce recurring symptoms from persistent Lyme disease? Tell us about it.

>> Next step: Come to our live evening lecture: Getting Rid of Lyme Disease in Frederick, Maryland on Monday November 6th at 6pm to learn more about treatments and remedies for multiple infections, natural methods for reducing neurological problems, inflammation, and pain caused by Lyme disease, co-infections, parasites, and mold. http://goodbyelyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme


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Image courtesy https://sites.google.com/site/herculesandthe12laborsbyalexis/labors

Sep 11 17

Two Frogs Healing Center to host Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Talk on Monday September 11th at 6pm at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc (FITCI)

by Greg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Two Frogs Healing Center to host Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Talk on Monday September 11th at 6pm at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc. (FITCI)

 

Frederick, Maryland, September 11th, 2017 – Two Frogs Healing Center, a natural treatment clinic for getting rid of persistent Lyme disease, will be hosting the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease Evening Lecture on Monday September 11th from 6pm – 9pm at the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc. (FITCI)

 

Lyme Disease is the number one vector borne illness in the US and in the US armed forces. Lyme Disease bacteria have developed multiple methods to become resistant to antibiotic treatment. These methods are believed to be the cause of relapsing symptoms of fatigue, brain fog, inflammation, and pain in chronic Lyme disease patients despite months or years of antibiotics.

At our clinic, we have successfully treated hundreds of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease and multiple tick borne coinfections. At the “Getting Rid of Lyme Disease” lecture we’ll be sharing how innovative treatments like Frequency Specific Microcurrent and highly effective natural remedies like microparticle aka “Liposomal” herbs are more effective at stopping relapsing Lyme disease and coinfection symptoms.

 

“Liposomes have the unique ability to penetrate deeply into cells and biofilms to get rid hidden forms of Lyme disease and coinfections,” – Greg Lee, President Two Frogs Healing Center. He will be sharing about the huge improvements that patients have received through these treatments and remedies at the Getting Rid of Lyme Disease talk on Monday.

 

About the Two Frogs Healing Center

The Two Frogs Healing Center has been a provider of natural remedies and treatments for helping patients to stop their persistent infections including Lyme disease, viruses, mold, bacteria, and parasites. Using advanced electrical scanning technology, Two Frogs is able to identify the underlying pathogens that are causing relapsing symptoms. Two Frogs also produces targeted, customized, natural remedies to address multiple chronic infections.  Its treatments and remedies encompass Frequency Specific Microcurrent, cold laser, acupuncture, cupping and bloodletting, craniosacral therapy, targeted Liposomal remedies, essential oils, homeopathic remedies, antimicrobial herbs, and detoxification supplements. The Two Frogs Healing Center has served the Lyme disease community since 2006 and has a clinic in the Frederick Innovative Technology Center Inc. For more information, visit www.GoodbyeLyme.com/events/get_rid_lyme.